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Old 06-26-2010, 08:35 PM
 
10,630 posts, read 22,744,640 times
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Keep it polite, please: you can disagree with opinions, but no personal attacks.
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Old 06-26-2010, 08:40 PM
 
10,630 posts, read 22,744,640 times
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Native Midwesterner here. I love LA; I also love the Midwest (well, at least Minneapolis.). I would happily live in LA again if we had a stable, secure, well-paying job; it's tough to raise a kid in LA, and right now I am comfortable with the fact that at this stage in life we'll be back in Minneapolis. (I'm only mentioning that since there was a reference in there somewhere to Midwesterners claiming expertise in CA...). I loved CA, still have friends and family in LA, and hope to be a regular visitor. In fact, LA has felt the most like "home" to me anywhere outside of Minneapolis.

Back to some of the other comments...anyone who claims LA residents don't volunteer is looking at his or her own set of friends and drawing conclusions. If you hang out with only "fake" people, then maybe, just maybe, you have a really skewed opinion. I worked in a nonprofit in LA (and volunteered at some other places, too), and can attest that yes, there are lots of people who volunteer. Not to mention lots of people without plastic surgery, etc. With a huge city and metro area like you find in LA of course you're going to find lots of fake people -- you'll also find lots of other types of people. That's the nature of a huge city. If you're mostly encountering people you consider to be "fake" (and don't like it), then there's an easy fix: meet some new friends. Maybe get a new job.
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Old 06-26-2010, 09:58 PM
 
427 posts, read 945,755 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caliguy19 View Post
If LA is "fake" than so is New york City.

they call it fake because of all the celebrities.
In George Carlin's book, Braindroppings, he refers to New York and LA as the 2 most hated, feared, and envied cities.
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Old 06-27-2010, 03:54 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles, Ca
2,884 posts, read 5,037,706 times
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The antithesis of LA? Probably Montana, Alaska, Vermont.

I was in Vermont a few years ago. The total opposite of LA's "plastic" culture. They even ban billboards in the state! And they limit big box stores. The complete antithesis, of like, Orange County.

I saw very few cell phones.
No, low riders or tricked out cars! Haha.
I dont think any grafitti, or very little.

Vermonts natural areas (mountains, rivers) make California's natural areas look store bought, and somewhat prepackaged. Like death valley, or the beaches. Just much less commercialism. Plastic surgery? Probably not as prevelant. Name dropping? Designer labels? Probably not as much.

Maine, New Hampshire were nice (and very different than la or california), but I found vermont to be the cleanest, most "unfake" state in the northeast. Way different than Massachusetts.
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Old 06-27-2010, 04:48 AM
 
Location: Guangzhou, China
9,620 posts, read 12,783,261 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott5280 View Post
I will add that LA posters get so mad when you say LA is Fake...No LA as whole isn't fake, but other cities claiming to be in the running should give up now. LA is the best of the best, the worst of the worst, and everything in between..
I actually agree with you that LA is the best of the best and the worst of worst... that's a great way to put it.

I love LA; I lived there for five years and miss it quite a bit; I'm in San Francisco now, and will most likely move back eventually.

The way I always described it was that the city is so huge, has so many people, has so much going on, it really is what you want it to be, or what you let it be. There's something for everyone, and that means that there's something for the people who are the antithesis of you.
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Old 06-27-2010, 05:20 AM
 
Location: Guangzhou, China
9,620 posts, read 12,783,261 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John23 View Post
Vermonts natural areas (mountains, rivers) make California's natural areas look store bought, and somewhat prepackaged. Like death valley, or the beaches. Just much less commercialism. Plastic surgery? Probably not as prevelant. Name dropping? Designer labels? Probably not as much.
Prepackaged.

This looks store bought???



Muir Woods, Central CA


Coldwater Canyon (which is in the Santa Monica mountains, which forms the north basin of Los Angeles)


Big Sur, Central CA


Lancaster, CA (about 45mins-1 hour outside LA)


Antelope Valley, CA

California has some of the most spectacular landscape in the Americas, and probably has more variations of terrain than anywhere else in the US. If you just don't like it then fine... my parents' backyard is old-growth New England forest. The river next to them always floods just before first snow, and so the water freezes and the trees look like they're growing from glass. You can see all of the colorful autumn foliage frozen under the ice, and so after it snows, when you kick it away with your foot, under the white blanket there's an explosion of red and orange and yellow. Neither region's beauty is mutually exclusive!

Quote:
Maine, New Hampshire were nice (and very different than la or california), but I found vermont to be the cleanest, most "unfake" state in the northeast. Way different than Massachusetts.
Yeah, Vermont and New Hampshire are sparsely-populated and largely undeveloped. It is a completely and totally different way of life.

I'm from the Boston area, and anyone who thinks that Boston is anything less than unfake simply knows absolutely nothing about the city or its inhabitants. If you've got a friend from Mass, you've got a friend for life. If someone says they'll meet you somewhere, they'll meet you there when they said they would. If they tell you they've got your back, they've got your back. If all you do is stand around the Prudential Center, hit the Macy's by Dowtown Crossing and have a croissant at Au Bon Pain with the other yuppies then it's as fake as the Beverly Center, but if you go see a show down Mass Ave past Berklee, hit a pub in Central Square, and get some cheese fries at Angelo's it doesn't get much more "legit."
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Old 06-27-2010, 05:33 AM
 
Location: Malibu/Miami Beach
1,070 posts, read 2,882,544 times
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Re Big Sur Picture. The waterfall in your picture is probably the drainage from some “big ass house” on the clifftop.
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Old 06-27-2010, 09:39 AM
 
Location: Guangzhou, China
9,620 posts, read 12,783,261 times
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Let's hear it for cynicism
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Old 06-27-2010, 11:02 AM
 
Location: SoCal
559 posts, read 1,075,297 times
Reputation: 612
I think there are many definitions of "fake" and in a place as diverse and massive as L.A. one can find examples that will fit each one of those definitions.

For folks who define fake as obsession over brands and material things, sure there are Angelenos who argue about DC vs Vans; Louis Vuitton vs. Gucci; Rolex vs. Omega. But what about people who fight over Chevy vs Ford vs Mopar ("friends don't let friends drive a Ford"), Snap-On vs Craftsman, Bud vs Coors or Smith & Wesson vs Colt? What about people who spend hours arguing over sports teams? I've only known a few people who've owned Porsches or Ferraris but these guys really, really loved their cars. They would have bought them regardless of what anyone else thinks of them—they weren't a status symbol.

Some people think celebrity or fame is a sign of fakeness. Maybe, but for a lot of people in entertainment, their career requires fame. If they aren't in the audience's consciousness, they're out of a job. The problem is that many people won't go to a movie or see a band unless it has someone famous in it, regardless of merit. It'd be nice if that wasn't the case but whatcha gonna do? I often read that L.A. is celebrity-obsessed but are the tabloids and celebrity programs like TMZ only shown and only popular in L.A.? I suspect that they are popular all over the country.

Another sign of fakery seems to be the interest in new things: yoga (really? it's been in the U.S. for decades if not close to a century), pilates, green-tech, sushi, etc. Major cities and maybe the west coast in particular tends to invent, accept and adopt new things so I guess it's foregone that at any one time, more people here will be experimenting with or partaking of these new things. But you know what? Many of these people enjoy the new things they're doing or putting down their gullet. If someone likes to try new things and actually likes it, what's so fake about that?

Different subcultures have their own set of dress, jargon and behavior: air-kissing theater kids vs spitting baseball players. I don't fit into either group and some of their behaviors probably elicit an eyeroll from me, but, fake? I doubt it.

I guess for me, the most basic definition of fake is to pretend to be what one is not. What about the atheist or Wiccan or gay/transgendered person who has to pretend to be a Christian or straight in some of the places being touted as "real" vs being comfortably open about it in a place like L.A.?
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Old 06-27-2010, 12:49 PM
 
Location: Pasadena
7,413 posts, read 7,824,032 times
Reputation: 1802
Quote:
Originally Posted by drunk on kool aid View Post
I think there are many definitions of "fake" and in a place as diverse and massive as L.A. one can find examples that will fit each one of those definitions.

For folks who define fake as obsession over brands and material things, sure there are Angelenos who argue about DC vs Vans; Louis Vuitton vs. Gucci; Rolex vs. Omega. But what about people who fight over Chevy vs Ford vs Mopar ("friends don't let friends drive a Ford"), Snap-On vs Craftsman, Bud vs Coors or Smith & Wesson vs Colt? What about people who spend hours arguing over sports teams? I've only known a few people who've owned Porsches or Ferraris but these guys really, really loved their cars. They would have bought them regardless of what anyone else thinks of them—they weren't a status symbol.

Some people think celebrity or fame is a sign of fakeness. Maybe, but for a lot of people in entertainment, their career requires fame. If they aren't in the audience's consciousness, they're out of a job. The problem is that many people won't go to a movie or see a band unless it has someone famous in it, regardless of merit. It'd be nice if that wasn't the case but whatcha gonna do? I often read that L.A. is celebrity-obsessed but are the tabloids and celebrity programs like TMZ only shown and only popular in L.A.? I suspect that they are popular all over the country.

Another sign of fakery seems to be the interest in new things: yoga (really? it's been in the U.S. for decades if not close to a century), pilates, green-tech, sushi, etc. Major cities and maybe the west coast in particular tends to invent, accept and adopt new things so I guess it's foregone that at any one time, more people here will be experimenting with or partaking of these new things. But you know what? Many of these people enjoy the new things they're doing or putting down their gullet. If someone likes to try new things and actually likes it, what's so fake about that?

Different subcultures have their own set of dress, jargon and behavior: air-kissing theater kids vs spitting baseball players. I don't fit into either group and some of their behaviors probably elicit an eyeroll from me, but, fake? I doubt it.

I guess for me, the most basic definition of fake is to pretend to be what one is not. What about the atheist or Wiccan or gay/transgendered person who has to pretend to be a Christian or straight in some of the places being touted as "real" vs being comfortably open about it in a place like L.A.?
Excellent post. It befuddles me than anyone would argue that Los Angeles is inferior to cities like "Baltimore" [add any other U.S. city]. I think the standard for unimaginable people is bland\ plain and uninteresting. Then these boring people thrash Los Angeles for being different than their sorry towns!
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