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Old 12-28-2010, 11:49 AM
 
Location: SoCal
2,262 posts, read 4,505,906 times
Reputation: 914

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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Aguilar View Post
Just because a place was good to grow up in, and just because that place was good for your parents and grandparents, doesn't mean it has to be (or is) good for you.

I left my "homeland" because it didn't suit the kind of lifestyle I wanted to have. I felt like an impostor, like I didn't fit in (or belong) to the madness.

With the exception of my brother, my mother's entire side of the family has abandoned greater LA. My father's entire side is still there, living their lives just as their parents did.

In life and America, we have this thing called freewill. I'm not going to live my life in a way, or a place, just because my family did, or because I grew up there.

I'll make my own way in a place where I want to be.
Yeah! What that guy said!
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Old 12-28-2010, 09:43 PM
 
Location: El Pueblo de Nuestra Señora la Reina de los Ángeles del Río de Porciúncula
1,510 posts, read 1,429,445 times
Reputation: 2333
having grown up in the south and never having felt at home there, coming to california was a revelation. i had a number of people who told me when i first got here, "welcome home".
LA is a very transient city, and that is because it is a beacon for those trying to achieve a dream. NYC is the same way, probably not as rootless, but i am always surprised when i meet a native.
its the same thing in atlanta. practically the entire city of rochester moved down south when the kodak plant closed. i think alot of movement in human history is based on where the crops are, i.e. money, jobs, good living, etc. i think EVERYONE wants some sort of roots in their life, eventually, but some can't find the good life and without a support system its tough to make it. never mind the fact that the days of buying a house on a factory worker's salary are gone forever.
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Old 12-29-2010, 01:37 AM
 
Location: Earth
11,979 posts, read 13,328,763 times
Reputation: 4100
From an objective standpoint, L.A. is a very difficult city to love (compared to San Francisco, a very easy city to love, or Portland, also an easy city to love). It is probably the weirdest place on the planet.

However, if you're from L.A., it's a different story. You feel you have roots and memories and you find yourself drawn back. L.A. is like the unfaithful and junked out crazy spouse who you get hooked on and always want to go back to. A sort of codependency, perhaps. But it's definitely an addictive city, and it gets into your blood. Ian Astbury of the Cult (one of many Brits who've gotten hooked on L.A.) said it was like the final outpost before you get to the Sahara Desert which you want to move on from but always wind up getting stuck in and not wanting to leave. For those of us who are natives - and in my case I'm sort of second generation - it is truly home, and one is always drawn back to home. I would love to move back, and hopefully I will. Nothing against SF or the Bay Area - it's great. But it isn't truly home.
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Old 12-29-2010, 02:48 AM
 
Location: GLAMA
16,587 posts, read 20,206,131 times
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Outside of the fact that I still love living here in the GLAMA, it's kinda neato to go to restaurants that my parents (as kids) went to with my grandparents back in the twenties and thirties (Philippe and Clifton's are two examples), or drive by their childhood homes and schools, not to mention my own.

And rather than feeling personally insulted, as some former residents do when they see how much their favorite area has changed over the years, I see a given area and do a mind picture of what it used to look like. Then I bore the hell out of everyone in earshot with that info.
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Old 12-29-2010, 01:35 PM
 
21,900 posts, read 12,674,184 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fontucky View Post
And rather than feeling personally insulted, as some former residents do when they see how much their favorite area has changed over the years, I see a given area and do a mind picture of what it used to look like. Then I bore the hell out of everyone in earshot with that info.
I don't know if I'd use the word "insulted" but I often say, "Dang! They put houses there??"
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Old 12-30-2010, 03:02 AM
 
565 posts, read 439,541 times
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Default What is Home Really?

I have never seriously understood why people call a place their home instead of the people who they would call significant others or children or parents or grandparents or any type of blood relation. Does it really matter where you live as long as your family is there as well? For me the lyrics to the Billy Joel song 'Your My Home' symbolized home for me more then any place I have ever lived.

YMMV
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Old 12-30-2010, 09:52 AM
 
539 posts, read 1,068,614 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stevebri View Post
I have never seriously understood why people call a place their home instead of the people who they would call significant others or children or parents or grandparents or any type of blood relation. Does it really matter where you live as long as your family is there as well? For me the lyrics to the Billy Joel song 'Your My Home' symbolized home for me more then any place I have ever lived.

YMMV
I agree that being surrounded by loved ones is important. I probably wouldn't stay if everyone I knew moved away.

But, there are still things here that have become a part of me. I've moved away temporarily a couple of times and found that there were thing that I greatly missed. Some of them were physical: the beach, the weather. I really missed seeing hills on the horizon. Some of them were in the attitudes of the people. Californians are pretty good about getting a job done and knowing when to ignore stupid rules that get in the way. A couple of the places I've traveled, work either never got done (Nicaragua) or they were so hung up on the rules that everything was painful (Germany), or that you had to humbly beg people to do their jobs if you wanted something done (Egypt).

But I'm not saying LA is the best place in the world. We know its not. When I drive up La Brea Blvd and think "for the love of God people can we have at least one building that doesn't have an ugly ass billboard on it" or when I ride my bike down National avoiding potholes large enough to swallow elephants, sometimes I look with jealously at my brother living in Kansas City, where the roads are paved and the government isn't insane.
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Old 12-30-2010, 11:46 AM
 
Location: SoCal
2,262 posts, read 4,505,906 times
Reputation: 914
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevebri View Post
I have never seriously understood why people call a place their home instead of the people who they would call significant others or children or parents or grandparents or any type of blood relation. Does it really matter where you live as long as your family is there as well?
YMMV
It did for me. I moved back to Boston to be near my family and I was miserable. I love my family and it absolutely broke my heart to move away from them AGAIN but you have to do what's right for you.

For some people, that's being near their family. For others it's moving away from a city/state that makes them physically and mentally depressed. My husband & I are horribly affected by the weather. I wish we weren't, and we tried like heck not to be for our daughter's sake... but that's the way it goes.

As much as I wanted my daughter to grow up around a big family the way I did... I think it's even more important for her to grow up with two happy & sane parents. That wasn't going to happen in Boston.

I've always considered Boston "home" and LA where I lived. Then I moved back "home" and realized that LA was now home for me. And Boston was where I grew up.
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