U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > California > Los Angeles
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-12-2007, 10:22 AM
 
Location: Sherman Oaks, CA
5,063 posts, read 9,869,956 times
Reputation: 5679
Actually, I felt both, and I think Northridge was worse - and I was a lot further away from it. I was in Joshua Tree for the Landers quake, only five miles away. It was a rolling motion, like waves. The dishes never even came out of the cupboards in the kitchen. Yes, it was big (I remember feeling the door frame moving back and forth in my hands - unfortunately, my instinct is to still leap into the doorway), but Northridge was far rougher.

I'd choose a bigger earthquake on a strike slip fault rather than a medium sized earthquake on a thrust fault any day. Unfortunately, most of the San Fernando Valley faults are the thrust kind, so the movement is more up and down, and very choppy.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-12-2007, 06:30 PM
 
Location: Northridge/Porter Ranch, Calif.
18,202 posts, read 15,440,095 times
Reputation: 4423
Quote:
Originally Posted by UB50 View Post
What I remember about the Northridge earthquake:

I remember being violently shaken awake AND LAUGHING! Mostly because I had gone through the Landers/Big Bear earthquakes out in the desert a year before and everyone I worked with laughed at me for being so afraid of them. Northridge was mild compared to Landers!

My business in Sherman Oaks was totally destroyed, but I still laughed because Northridge seemed so mild compared to Landers. (Sorry, but as someone who went through both, this is true.)

Landers earthquake, to me, set the bar. The Northridge earthquake was just a funny thing that happened afterwards. The Landers earthquake was so much more powerful and the Big Bear quake that followed it a couple of hours later really punctuated it. What everyone seemed to miss (with Northridge) was all the strong aftershocks (over 5.0) that punctuated the Landers quake leading into the Big Bear quake.

Anyway, Northridge seemed like a joke after that. And I actually was able to laugh at all the people who criticized me over my reaction to the Landers quake. They didn't seem to find that itty-bitty Northridge quake so funny.
Although the Landers quake (7.3 magnitude) was much stronger than the Northridge quake (6.7 mag.), the latter was in a much more densely populated area, resulting in far, far more damage to structures and also more casualties.

Don't think that 6.7 magnitude was weak compared to the Landers quake... during that quake, the Ceder Hill Nursery, which is situated on a mere 50-foot hill in Tarzana, about 4 miles south of the epicenter, experienced a horozontal acceleration that peaked briefly at 1.8 g, the highest ever recorded in an earthquake up to that time.

I live about 3.8 miles from the epicenter of the '94 Northridge EQ and the last thing I was doing was laughing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-13-2007, 04:38 AM
 
5,468 posts, read 7,777,498 times
Reputation: 1444
Quote:
Originally Posted by SandyCo View Post
Actually, I felt both, and I think Northridge was worse - and I was a lot further away from it. I was in Joshua Tree for the Landers quake, only five miles away. It was a rolling motion, like waves. The dishes never even came out of the cupboards in the kitchen. Yes, it was big (I remember feeling the door frame moving back and forth in my hands - unfortunately, my instinct is to still leap into the doorway), but Northridge was far rougher.

I'd choose a bigger earthquake on a strike slip fault rather than a medium sized earthquake on a thrust fault any day. Unfortunately, most of the San Fernando Valley faults are the thrust kind, so the movement is more up and down, and very choppy.
My parents were living close to Landers when that one hit but they were moving -- and we were actually up and surrounded by piles of boxes in the living room at the time. I remember watching the boxes flying through the air while we scrambled around trying to catch things. The constant big aftershocks after that quake really spooked me though. Every 10 or 15 minutes, there was another big one... Then Big Bear hit.

I felt much more comfortable after Northridge because there was not a series of evenly-spaced big aftershocks.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-13-2007, 04:43 AM
 
5,468 posts, read 7,777,498 times
Reputation: 1444
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fleet View Post
Although the Landers quake (7.3 magnitude) was much stronger than the Northridge quake (6.7 mag.), the latter was in a much more densely populated area, resulting in far, far more damage to structures and also more casualties.

Don't think that 6.7 magnitude was weak compared to the Landers quake... during that quake, the Ceder Hill Nursery, which is situated on a mere 50-foot hill in Tarzana, about 4 miles south of the epicenter, experienced a horozontal acceleration that peaked briefly at 1.8 g, the highest ever recorded in an earthquake up to that time.

I live about 3.8 miles from the epicenter of the '94 Northridge EQ and the last thing I was doing was laughing.
If you had been where I was for both of them, you would have thought the Northridge quake was mild too, even though it shook violently. Landers shook much harder, which is why it was a 7.3 and not a 6.7.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-13-2007, 10:11 AM
 
Location: Northridge/Porter Ranch, Calif.
18,202 posts, read 15,440,095 times
Reputation: 4423
Quote:
Originally Posted by UB50 View Post
If you had been where I was for both of them, you would have thought the Northridge quake was mild too, even though it shook violently. Landers shook much harder, which is why it was a 7.3 and not a 6.7.
It does depend where you were. If you were practically on top of the epicenter, the Northridge quake was anything but mild. I should know!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-13-2007, 10:37 AM
 
786 posts, read 1,191,098 times
Reputation: 904
Quote:
Originally Posted by desertdawgx View Post
I was living in a 4 story apartment building near Parthenia and Reseda in 94,i was on the bottom floor.It threw me 3 feet in the air and i could see the four by fours in the wall bending blowing drywall paste and the paint on the walls all over the apartment.My front door would not open as the everything was crooked,my refrigerater fell over,the big mirror in bathroom shattered,my Toyota 4x4 was sidesways in the underground garage.Most windows in the building shattered,the juccuzi was only 1/4 full.I have pictures I will post later.I have daybreak pictures of the collapsed apartment buildings on Reseda and Plummer.The 118 collapse the Hospital on Devonshire and Balboa deystroyed.I was one more jolt away from being under rubble.When i saw people die and lose everything i refused the FEMA money as I was just happy to be alive and felt others needed it more than I.
Thanks for the reminder of the suffering that tens of thousands of Valley residents endured. There were train accidents, vehicle accidents, fires, toxic gases, collapsed freeways and bridges, and disrupted utilities. Hospital emergency rooms were overcrowded, and people slept in cars and tents because they were afraid to return to their homes.

The drive to the SFV via Angeles Crest was a mild inconvenience compared to what other families had to deal with. My daughter went to school at Littlerock High with the daughter of LAPD motor officer Howard W. Dean, who died on his way to help others. All of those kids felt the pain of that young girl's loss.

Had an opportunity the day after to speak with a guy who lived across from the Northridge Meadows Apartments. All of his LR furniture ended up on the floor downstairs, but the family survived unharmed. An elderly client of mine was trapped in her bed in a pile of debris in total darkness. A home further west, in the 24000 block, was condemned but the neighbors' homes were unscathed. Such is the capriciousness of a thrust quake.

I applaud you for your stance on the FEMA money. Your type of morality was rare, though, and volumes could be written about the fraud that occurred following the quake.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-13-2007, 06:57 PM
 
Location: Los Feliz
1,749 posts, read 5,786,595 times
Reputation: 717
We were lucky. I was living in a 2 story townhouse in Redondo Beach. I'd fallen asleep on the futon in the living room with the TV on. Suddenly I was awakened being thrown to my feet. It was a loud "BOOM!" like a bomb or I thought perhaps the nearby power plant had an explosion. The residents of our complex were all huddled in our doorways wrapped in blankets. All we lost was a champagne glass. I went down to the marina later and small boats had literally been thrown out of the water. It was strange. I went driving in the valley a few days later and saw the apartment buildings that appeared to be one story and used to be two....

This quake had different characteristics from ones I was in when I was in Hawaii or South America. I was in a 7.8 in Hawaii many years ago which generated a tsunami that wiped out a hotel near us. Many homes were destroyed and huge cracks opened in the ground. The Northridge quake had a vertical axis which was it's most frightening aspect. I was in an all glass control room in San Luis Obispo for the Loma Prieta quake. All the glass started shaking...I don't think it was safety glass....
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-30-2007, 12:47 PM
 
Location: The 719
8,039 posts, read 12,854,322 times
Reputation: 9412
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles View Post
I was nine years old living in Canoga Park in 1971. Very scary. Living near Moorpark College in 1994. There were some eerie similiarities to the Sylmar quake 2/9/71 5:59 AM and the Northridge quake 1/17/94, 4:31 AM.

Both days were warm and windy Santa Ana winds days - in the dead of winter. (I distinctly remember shooting hoops in 1971 in my front yard (school cancelled) with this warm wind blowing.)
Both hit when many people were in deep sleep, awakening to dark, loud, and disturbing confusion.
Both ruined overpasses in the Newhall pass

So, next time it is 85 degrees and breezy in January, check your flashlight batteries.
I was 4 at the time of the Sylmar quake when we lived in Chatsworth. My parents came into my bedroom and I was on the floor holding onto my bedpost. My parents took me and my brother through the hall into the living room. The hallway was rocking from side to side and my mom thought we were being bombed. My two oldest brothers were laughing as this chandelier was rocking back and forth. One of them, my brother Mark, would feel a tremor coming on and say "I'm going to make an Earthquake". I'd say "Stop it"! I swear, those aftershocks were even more scary because you didn't know whether those would be the biggie or not.

In 94', my brother Mark was living in Northridge in a rental house. He had his two Springer Spaniels Bo and Jett and about 6 pups. Two of the pups were injured as was Mark. He was up all night playing on his computer and he said that everything that was solid but not tied down fell over and smaller things just shifted back and forth. With his own money, he tried to fix the place up. But the house was condemned and he had to move out. I went out there and he was living in his car with two of his oldest dogs Bo and Jett (he found homes for the pups) and his laptop. We sold his car and got a 1 ton van (with trade of his laptop and his car) and I brought him back to Denver where I lived. He got a job as a butcher for a while, but one winter it was so cold that his doors froze shut. He sold the van, got a Ford Dielsel and a streamliner trailer and moved to southern Florida. His dogs recently passed, but I think he still misses the Valley.

So when's the next big one gonna be?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-30-2007, 01:59 PM
 
434 posts, read 1,058,984 times
Reputation: 138
Is it true that if you're in a single family home, you're okay (no floors to collpase on you)?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-30-2007, 02:36 PM
 
Location: Earth
11,880 posts, read 12,807,940 times
Reputation: 3994
Quote:
Originally Posted by James T View Post
I believe it was the History Channel a few months ago that mentioned the second quake in Santa Monica, though i suppose to a degree it's subjective -- I'm no seismologist. We lost chimneys in various places on the Westside, and some buildings on Wilshire in Santa Monica were condemned.
Ocean Park and Venice were built on marshland, so the poor quality of soil resulted in disproportionate damage that didn't occur a little inland. I think the soil in northern SM isn't too good either.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2011 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > California > Los Angeles
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top