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Old 05-25-2012, 05:43 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 12,563,975 times
Reputation: 3941

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Quote:
Originally Posted by TravisPickle View Post
I moved to Downtown Los Angeles after spending 5 months in Los Feliz. I liked Los Feliz but felt that it was too homogenous, too spread out. Walking through deserted residential streets at night to grab a drink is not my idea of "walkable neighborhood".

Keep in mind that I moved here from NYC (greenwich village) so my idea of a walkable neighborhood is... an entire city.

Now, DTLA is an interesting animal. A part of me gets very frustrated with it. Why? Because this city let it rot for decades. It was the hotspot in the 30s and 40s, the stomping grounds of the rich and famous. And then it entered a downward spiral that has only recently been reversed. Walking by the movie palaces, which are almost all in ruins, is so depressing. And fine, the Orpheum is beautiful- but what about the 20 other ones that are either falling apart, or being used to sell cell phone covers?

There is only one problem with DTLA.

SKID ROW.

Eliminate Skid Row, and you finally see light at the end of the tunnel.

No amount of fine dining, bars, hotels, tourists or gentrification is going to make a difference. It's a dog chasing its tail.

Go for a walk after 9 pm in any street OTHER than Spring. What's the experience like? Be honest. It's not pleasant. Your nostrils will be working overtime, breathing in some of the most unpleasant bodily fumes you can imagine. You will be pestered for money by some half-sane homeless people. Then you will be pestered by some bat**** crazy ones. Sure, the pirate is sweet. But for every pirate there are hundreds, thousands of insane ones who WILL NOT LEAVE YOU ALONE.

You sit outside Pete's Cafe, you think "oh this is quite nice", but then the whiff of **** hits you, you're surrounded by zombie homeless people, and you are reminded that...

DTLA is just not there yet. And it won't be for a really Moderator cut: language long time, because Skid Row's shadow looms large over most corners of it. Sure, you won't find the homeless at California Plaza. Or outside Deloitte and Douche. But the other parts are overrun.

You want St. Francis style sympathy? **** that. I had that for the first two weeks of living here. It vanished. I feel sorry for the homeless because they are victims of a ridiculous, ignorant, arrogant political system. Most of them are insane. Some are criminally insane. And others are just criminals. They need to be dealt with accordingly. Putting missions in the heart of Downtown Los Angeles was the biggest mistake ever- because it fuels the fire.
Sorry downtown LA doesn't meet your strict Sex in the City requirements that Greenwich Village offers.

Last edited by Count David; 05-26-2012 at 10:32 AM..
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Old 05-25-2012, 06:09 PM
 
Location: L.A./O.C.
574 posts, read 1,141,219 times
Reputation: 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by TravisPickle View Post
I moved to Downtown Los Angeles after spending 5 months in Los Feliz. I liked Los Feliz but felt that it was too homogenous, too spread out. Walking through deserted residential streets at night to grab a drink is not my idea of "walkable neighborhood".

Keep in mind that I moved here from NYC (greenwich village) so my idea of a walkable neighborhood is... an entire city.

Now, DTLA is an interesting animal. A part of me gets very frustrated with it. Why? Because this city let it rot for decades. It was the hotspot in the 30s and 40s, the stomping grounds of the rich and famous. And then it entered a downward spiral that has only recently been reversed. Walking by the movie palaces, which are almost all in ruins, is so depressing. And fine, the Orpheum is beautiful- but what about the 20 other ones that are either falling apart, or being used to sell cell phone covers?

There is only one problem with DTLA.

SKID ROW.

Eliminate Skid Row, and you finally see light at the end of the tunnel.

No amount of fine dining, bars, hotels, tourists or gentrification is going to make a difference. It's a dog chasing its tail.

Go for a walk after 9 pm in any street OTHER than Spring. What's the experience like? Be honest. It's not pleasant. Your nostrils will be working overtime, breathing in some of the most unpleasant bodily fumes you can imagine. You will be pestered for money by some half-sane homeless people. Then you will be pestered by some bat**** crazy ones. Sure, the pirate is sweet. But for every pirate there are hundreds, thousands of insane ones who WILL NOT LEAVE YOU ALONE.

You sit outside Pete's Cafe, you think "oh this is quite nice", but then the whiff of **** hits you, you're surrounded by zombie homeless people, and you are reminded that...

DTLA is just not there yet. And it won't be for a really Moderator cut: language long time, because Skid Row's shadow looms large over most corners of it. Sure, you won't find the homeless at California Plaza. Or outside Deloitte and Douche. But the other parts are overrun.

You want St. Francis style sympathy? **** that. I had that for the first two weeks of living here. It vanished. I feel sorry for the homeless because they are victims of a ridiculous, ignorant, arrogant political system. Most of them are insane. Some are criminally insane. And others are just criminals. They need to be dealt with accordingly. Putting missions in the heart of Downtown Los Angeles was the biggest mistake ever- because it fuels the fire.
you are clearly a hater who hasnt even lived in DTLA, just trying to make our city center look like Moderator cut: language.

Last edited by Count David; 05-26-2012 at 10:32 AM..
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Old 05-25-2012, 09:11 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles, Ca
2,884 posts, read 5,038,465 times
Reputation: 2725
I don't go downtown very often. A few staples center events and some other things.

-Fix the one way streets. I think they are outdated, and they don't fit in the rest of LA. How many other parts of LA have one way streets? Not many. I don't think its really natural.

In LA, you have all these freeways, highways. I think the one way streets will get worst if traffic gets worst.

-It needs more beautification, and parks.

I.e., if you go to staples and you park 4 or 5 blocks to the east, you're walking back what looks like in skid row. There should be more landscaping.

Parts of south downtown LA still look kind of broken down.

-I think a football stadium and/or big entertainment complex would really make it world class. I.e. like cowboy stadium in Dallas. Real modern looking.

I don't think downtown LA has the seating or parking capacity of other city centers. Like able to hand a superbowl or olympic events.
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Old 05-28-2012, 08:58 AM
 
3 posts, read 5,720 times
Reputation: 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by TravisPickle View Post
I moved to Downtown Los Angeles after spending 5 months in Los Feliz. I liked Los Feliz but felt that it was too homogenous, too spread out. Walking through deserted residential streets at night to grab a drink is not my idea of "walkable neighborhood".

Keep in mind that I moved here from NYC (greenwich village) so my idea of a walkable neighborhood is... an entire city.

Now, DTLA is an interesting animal. A part of me gets very frustrated with it. Why? Because this city let it rot for decades. It was the hotspot in the 30s and 40s, the stomping grounds of the rich and famous. And then it entered a downward spiral that has only recently been reversed. Walking by the movie palaces, which are almost all in ruins, is so depressing. And fine, the Orpheum is beautiful- but what about the 20 other ones that are either falling apart, or being used to sell cell phone covers?

There is only one problem with DTLA.

SKID ROW.

Eliminate Skid Row, and you finally see light at the end of the tunnel.

No amount of fine dining, bars, hotels, tourists or gentrification is going to make a difference. It's a dog chasing its tail.

Go for a walk after 9 pm in any street OTHER than Spring. What's the experience like? Be honest. It's not pleasant. Your nostrils will be working overtime, breathing in some of the most unpleasant bodily fumes you can imagine. You will be pestered for money by some half-sane homeless people. Then you will be pestered by some bat**** crazy ones. Sure, the pirate is sweet. But for every pirate there are hundreds, thousands of insane ones who WILL NOT LEAVE YOU ALONE.

You sit outside Pete's Cafe, you think "oh this is quite nice", but then the whiff of **** hits you, you're surrounded by zombie homeless people, and you are reminded that...

DTLA is just not there yet. And it won't be for a really Moderator cut: language long time, because Skid Row's shadow looms large over most corners of it. Sure, you won't find the homeless at California Plaza. Or outside Deloitte and Douche. But the other parts are overrun.

You want St. Francis style sympathy? **** that. I had that for the first two weeks of living here. It vanished. I feel sorry for the homeless because they are victims of a ridiculous, ignorant, arrogant political system. Most of them are insane. Some are criminally insane. And others are just criminals. They need to be dealt with accordingly. Putting missions in the heart of Downtown Los Angeles was the biggest mistake ever- because it fuels the fire.
I can't disagree with you...and I hope more people like you put pressure on the politicians to make changes. When I invested in a handful of loft units Downtown, I was very concerned about the location closest to skid row. I decided that 9th and Broadway was far enough from skid row and had the potential to become a better neighborhood due to the historic nature of the buildings. Changes are happening now. The benefit of Los Angeles turning its back on the theaters is that most were not torn down like other cities. in the last few years we have seen the restoration or part restoration on the Mayan, the Orpheum, the Million Dollar, the Los Angeles, the Palace, the UA (becoming the ACE hotel and theater), the Belasco, the Globe, the Regent. Others like the Tower will become renovated...they already made the changes on the exterior.

Skid Row is Downtown's nightmare. It is a sad place. When political candidates like Romney say that the poor are taken care of...they don't have a clue what it is like on Skid Row. Changes have to come from the demands of the new residents Downtown. I am very bullish on Downtown and if you have issues with specific homeless individuals...contact LAHSA.org. They help find homes for those in need. I hope you don't get discouraged and move. It is a very interesting place and is becoming better year after year.
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Old 05-28-2012, 10:08 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles, CA
1,045 posts, read 1,542,473 times
Reputation: 690
Even in downtown's heyday (say from the 1920's to the 1940's), the area we now call skid row was mostly populated by the transient poor, low income households, and the downtrodden.

Granted, there was not a "homeless" problem in those days. But since the 1970's the rise of the homeless on our streets has altered the character of skid row (for the worse). But that is a common problem across the country (granted skid row is perhaps the worst manifestation of the problem). Sadly our culture has come to accept the homeless as a fact of life. And the courts have ruled in favor of giving the mentally ill homeless the right to rome the streets....even if they can't care for themselves. I don't see the problem going away anytime soon.

Downtown San Francisco seems to have as large or worse problem with the homeless. Granted skid row in DTLA problaby concentrates it in a worse way. But downtown SF seems to have more of a homeless issue spread across its downtown than the rest of downtown LA (historic core, so. park, etc).
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Old 05-28-2012, 12:05 PM
 
4,028 posts, read 8,299,064 times
Reputation: 2871
Quote:
Originally Posted by SalParadise View Post
Even in downtown's heyday (say from the 1920's to the 1940's), the area we now call skid row was mostly populated by the transient poor, low income households, and the downtrodden.

Granted, there was not a "homeless" problem in those days. But since the 1970's the rise of the homeless on our streets has altered the character of skid row (for the worse). But that is a common problem across the country (granted skid row is perhaps the worst manifestation of the problem). Sadly our culture has come to accept the homeless as a fact of life. And the courts have ruled in favor of giving the mentally ill homeless the right to rome the streets....even if they can't care for themselves. I don't see the problem going away anytime soon.

Downtown San Francisco seems to have as large or worse problem with the homeless. Granted skid row in DTLA problaby concentrates it in a worse way. But downtown SF seems to have more of a homeless issue spread across its downtown than the rest of downtown LA (historic core, so. park, etc).
This is largely true.

There actually IS enough shelter spaces and SRO for the people that will actually accept the terms and conditions of living in these situations.

But there is a large enough population of mentally ill and hardcore drug addicts that won't accept ANY housing situation, let alone one with significant conditions.

And unfortunately the local government along with SOME shady organizations taking govt money and support in the name of supposedly helping the homeless(and unfortunately the ones most vocal in attempting to tug on peoples heartstrings) have created a little mini environment on skid row that is conducive to allowing mentally ill and drug addicts an "acceptable"(at least in their minds) social living situation.

The number of homeless, and better yet the number of criminals that prey on them, will continue to diminish as Downtown LA increases in population and tourists. I already notice fewer and fewer transients in the area where I live(South Park), and also fewer along 7th, Hill, Broadway, and Spring. The more "normal" people that are in the area, the less comfortable the scammers, addicts, and hustlers will feel. Eventually this should break the stranglehold the addict and criminal elements have over the Skid Row area....its just going to take quite a few years.
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Old 05-28-2012, 01:52 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles, CA
1,045 posts, read 1,542,473 times
Reputation: 690
Yep, I agree. I would add that the LAPD recently added about 40 or 50 new police officers to the downtown LA beat. That is good news and many of them will be on foot. Hopefully, that increased presence will make a huge dent in the pushers/criminals who come to Skid Row and the Historic Core to run their scams but don't actually live in downtown LA at all.
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Old 05-28-2012, 07:30 PM
 
Location: Mt Washington: NELA
1,162 posts, read 2,841,726 times
Reputation: 636
Absolutely correct, and the SROs that are still all over the Nickel are a carryover from the days when men would travel to Los Angeles to work on the railroads and needed basically just a room to sleep in. We're talking before the 1900s. There were alot of brothels downtown as well, catering to that workforce, among others.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SalParadise View Post
Even in downtown's heyday (say from the 1920's to the 1940's), the area we now call skid row was mostly populated by the transient poor, low income households, and the downtrodden.

Granted, there was not a "homeless" problem in those days. But since the 1970's the rise of the homeless on our streets has altered the character of skid row (for the worse). But that is a common problem across the country (granted skid row is perhaps the worst manifestation of the problem). Sadly our culture has come to accept the homeless as a fact of life. And the courts have ruled in favor of giving the mentally ill homeless the right to rome the streets....even if they can't care for themselves. I don't see the problem going away anytime soon.

Downtown San Francisco seems to have as large or worse problem with the homeless. Granted skid row in DTLA problaby concentrates it in a worse way. But downtown SF seems to have more of a homeless issue spread across its downtown than the rest of downtown LA (historic core, so. park, etc).
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Old 06-15-2012, 05:03 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 12,563,975 times
Reputation: 3941
Here is some more encouraging news about a project that is partially downtown.

Separated Bike Lanes on South Fig? LADOT Presentation Hints at Future Project | Streetsblog Los Angeles

Separated bicycle lane, a separated bus-only lane from 7th St all the way down to MLK Boulevard. This will help make the distance between Expo Park and DTLA seem much, much smaller - with more development like this pushing south there could be a day that most will consider downtown to stretch all the way south to MLK Blvd. (and with the Union Station redevelopment, north to the State Historic Park).
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Old 07-29-2012, 11:02 AM
 
1,564 posts, read 1,008,727 times
Reputation: 496
Bro L.A hosted the olympics twice the only city in America to have done so
Every city has it's problem and in L.A we had the 92 riots that flipped the city on it's head,matter fact L.A in the 90"s was the murder capital and broke records of gang related homicides...but the potential that L.A has in it's short history has been amazing if L.A had the same start in the 1600"s like NYC Phillie d.c than I think everything we're building up right now would've been done like the Westside subway project or subway to the lax" but with all it's problems L.A. Is still a world class city it still competes with NYC and London on a world level and to keep it on topic downtown L.A has great history in it's short period....... The fashion center is the biggest in the country alot of people don't even know that because they're always judging Los Angeles instead of accepting it and to be fair you guys need to google the fashion district in new York and many of you will be surprised it's almost out of
Buisness.....than throw in the biggest jewelry district in the nation is downtown L.A the historic site on Broadway where Michael Jackson shot the thriller video that's amazing alone.....but give downtown a couple more years of construction and I see the future of downtown being better than any city downtown
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