U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > California > Los Angeles
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-18-2012, 05:22 PM
 
14,223 posts, read 26,530,853 times
Reputation: 8384

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by winoceros View Post
I can see the case for single family home rentals not coming with appliances like that, however I did see a couple of 1 bedroom apartments around without fridges. I'm new in the area so I was completely ignorant of this practice, I figured "they're between tenants, maybe they're upgrading". As someone who's lived in 4 different cities (and 2 different countries!) in the past 3 years, I would find an apartment without a refrigerator or stove a no-go for me. It would be completely backwards to have to buy a refrigerator at every place I've been at just to turn around and sell it for a fraction of the price because it would cost too much to move and because landlords apparently can't be arsed to maintain appliances.
Most of my rentals are single family or family sized plexes...

The turnover is much less and so is the drama.

If your neighbor is too loud in the next apartment call the landlord... if you next door neighbor in a house is too loud... call the police.

In all fairness... the cost of purchasing the appliance is the least of it for the landlords I know... it is the ongoing responsibility, liability and repair/maintenance issues.

At one complex, years ago... got a call from a women's son very upset that his mom's refrigerator would not keep ice cream from melting... he wanted a new unit and he wanted it today, on a Saturday.

I went to investigate and found the cause to be a totally blocked condenser from cat hair... she had two cats, allowed by her lease.

Nothing about the call or the situation was the owners fault... yet we were on the receiving end of something totally tenant caused...

I guess if it came down to it... I would rather buy/reimburse a tenant the cost of a standard a refrigerator.

My Dishwasher problems have almost always been caused by very dirty dishes...

Garbage Disposal problems have almost always caused by a utensile or broken glass jamming the blades...

Gas Stove burner problems almost always caused by spills from cooking.

When I managed larger complexes... we always kept a couple of under counter refrigerators on hand in the event a refrigerator went out on a holiday or weekend... at least meds and essentials could be kept cold.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-18-2012, 06:22 PM
 
Location: San Jose, CA
7,816 posts, read 6,909,601 times
Reputation: 4800
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultrarunner View Post

In all fairness... the cost of purchasing the appliance is the least of it for the landlords I know... it is the ongoing responsibility, liability and repair/maintenance issues.
Well yeah, that's a pain the ass. Is it not possible for the tenant to sign a waiver absolving the landlord/owner of maintenance needs for the appliances? Says right in my lease that the dishwasher is an extra item left to our disposal, but it's our responsibility to fix it if we so choose.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-18-2012, 09:22 PM
 
Location: Dallas, Texas
1,893 posts, read 2,496,856 times
Reputation: 1954
I grew up in LA and just assumed apartments never came with refrigerators until I realized it was just the opposite in every other major city in America. Regardless of the legal/safety/cleanliness issues raised regarding an appliance supplied by the landlord vs. one supplied by the tenant, why is it only in Southern California where this is standard practice? Are Southern Californians that much more litigious than Northern Californians or New Yorkers? Or is it just one of those unknowable mysteries of the universe, like Southern Californians saying "The 405" while the other 49 states would just say "405"?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-19-2012, 02:01 AM
 
14,223 posts, read 26,530,853 times
Reputation: 8384
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigdumbgod View Post
Well yeah, that's a pain the ass. Is it not possible for the tenant to sign a waiver absolving the landlord/owner of maintenance needs for the appliances? Says right in my lease that the dishwasher is an extra item left to our disposal, but it's our responsibility to fix it if we so choose.
I think the success will depend on location... I have a friend that manages units in Hawaii... most renters there do not travel with refrigerators...

Their standard lease says the tenant is responsible for the first $100 of repair calls after the first month... they say tenants take better care because they have something at stake.

I have helped tenants find appliances... one home has a refrigerator that has been sold from tenant to tenant 3 times now... the going price has been $75

At another building the lease gave the option for the tenant to use the Refrigerator in the unit or have it removed by calling the landlord... it also stated plainly the lease did not include a Refrigerator...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-19-2012, 02:05 AM
 
14,223 posts, read 26,530,853 times
Reputation: 8384
Quote:
Originally Posted by TrueDat View Post
I grew up in LA and just assumed apartments never came with refrigerators until I realized it was just the opposite in every other major city in America. Regardless of the legal/safety/cleanliness issues raised regarding an appliance supplied by the landlord vs. one supplied by the tenant, why is it only in Southern California where this is standard practice? Are Southern Californians that much more litigious than Northern Californians or New Yorkers? Or is it just one of those unknowable mysteries of the universe, like Southern Californians saying "The 405" while the other 49 states would just say "405"?
The SF Bay Area is much the same... definitely not a given the rent will include a refrigerator.

Similar arguments could be made for washers, dryers, microwave, air conditioners, etc... unless the item is required by code... such as a heater and water heater in my area.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-19-2012, 02:47 AM
 
Location: Northwest Indiana
691 posts, read 1,302,180 times
Reputation: 679
In a good portion of Europe, the kitchen in a rental comes,,,,,,,as a empty room. No appliances, no cabinets, no countertops, nothing but a floor, four walls, plugs and a ceiling and a place to hook up a sink. That's it! That is the reason why a place like IKEA and its modular cabinets etc, are like what they are. Because they started out building portable kitchens for people who rented.

When i was in college, I shared my apartment with friends from Europe. I was moving out first, as I had graduated (I had moved in first), and they were worried I was taking the kitchen with me!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-19-2012, 11:05 AM
 
Location: GLAMA
16,585 posts, read 20,662,767 times
Reputation: 16148
^^^^ Proof positive that some Americans are whiny little female dogs.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-19-2012, 12:06 PM
 
Location: North Hollywood
326 posts, read 321,288 times
Reputation: 212
I've rented in both UK and Los Angeles. In UK you always get a fridge, most of the time you get a washer-dryer too.

Isn't a fridge essential in this day and age? You need one in the hot weather! When I first moved to downtown LA, before I purchased my first fridge, i was reduced to keeping my milk cold by putting it in a bucket filled with cold water!

My last apartment in Hermosa Beach came with a fridge, but it was pretty small.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-19-2012, 12:12 PM
 
14,223 posts, read 26,530,853 times
Reputation: 8384
Quote:
Originally Posted by richb View Post
In a good portion of Europe, the kitchen in a rental comes,,,,,,,as a empty room. No appliances, no cabinets, no counter tops, nothing but a floor, four walls, plugs and a ceiling and a place to hook up a sink. That's it! That is the reason why a place like IKEA and its modular cabinets etc, are like what they are. Because they started out building portable kitchens for people who rented.

When i was in college, I shared my apartment with friends from Europe. I was moving out first, as I had graduated (I had moved in first), and they were worried I was taking the kitchen with me!
I found this to be my experience at the time I was working in Germany and Austria after college...

A very good friend told me he was helping her daughter move to an apartment on the weekend... I offered to help. The apartment was in Vienna Austria.

I was thinking furniture moving and it never occurred to me we would also be installing an Ikea kitchen and bathroom!!!

The apartment location and building were quite nice and they were very happy to have found it.

It was rather large for a one bedroom with a nice balcony overlooking the busy street below...

The walls were freshly painted and the floor refinished... it had nothing in the kitchen except the wall stub outs for a sink and electrical outlets... the bath only had a tub, toilet and wall mounted water heater...

All the rooms had a bare light bulb connected to ceiling wires...

The landlord was renting the space and provided heat and a roof... virtually everything else would be furnished be the renter... from the cabinets, appliances, towel bars, light fixtures, etc...

I also met a few building owners... they said it is their custom because people like to be able and decorate their apartments the way they want and it keeps the landlord/tenant relationship simple...

So in Austria and Germany... it is not unusual for a 19 year old university student to rent off campus and have to furnish everything including the kitchen sink

Oh... and when she moves... the landlord has the option to require her to return the unit how she found it even if she wanted to leave her kitchen and bath...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-19-2012, 02:09 PM
 
Location: Hollywood, CA
397 posts, read 463,409 times
Reputation: 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by CALGUY View Post
I couldn't let your post go by without a response.
Over the years, I have been told, not only by my tenants, but those who are associated with my business, that I am one of the best landlords in the entire city.
The reasons this may be so are below:
My rents are lower than market value by choice, that being, it is not a quest to make bundles of money,but rather to give people a break when renting.
My buildings are ALWAYS maintained in 100% condition.
I NEVER raise the rent.
I don't care if a tenant stays 20 years, they will not be paying a dime more than they did, the day they moved in.
Over the years I have spent thousands and thousands of dollars in capital improvements on the properties, and not asked one tenant to give any kind of reimbursement.
Legally I am entitled to collect a percentage of the capital improvements, but I have never felt the want, or need to do that.
My properties are located in sought after communities.
ALL my properties are kept in immaculate condition.
The picture below is one of my properties in the northeast section of the city, and is representative of all my properties.
The face that I choose to not supply stoves and refrigerators is nothing more than a sound business practice.
Over the years, my not increasing the rents has proven to be another sound business practice.

Bob.
So you post a picture that, honestly, is one of the worst beauty pictures I have ever seen. Creepy is the first word I would use to describe that picture.

Sorry, but all of the above is junk. You sound like a slum lord who is trying to deflect your cheapness with lies and unsourced statements. It's the job of an apartment owner to make upgrades and repairs. You act like you do it out of the kindness of your heart. That, right there, is a big warning sign.

You try to say "I NEVER RAISE RENT" and then talk about sound business practice a little later. Sorry, but you're making conflicting statements. If you really cared about your residents you would provide basic utilities to enhance their lives. Give us a reference to someone who has lived in your apartment building 20, or whatever, years.

My apartment hallway just got new carpet. It's cleaned weekly. We aren't expected to pay cleaning bills for that. It also came with a fridge and a stove. These are basic responsibilities I expect when I rent. Not something to brag about.

You make statements but give no evidence to back up that you aren't a slum lord. Where is your property list? What do you charge for rent? It's the internet. Anyone can claim something. And, honestly, based on that picture your apartments look crappy. And your refusal to give a property list, while trying to claim public forum, is hilarious. If you're so great of a landlord you'd love free advertisement.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2011 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $89,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > California > Los Angeles

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top