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Old 02-20-2013, 12:13 PM
 
10 posts, read 54,160 times
Reputation: 18

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Ok so...my wife and I recently bought a house. One major update that we planned on doing was getting rid of the popcorn ceiling. So I was doing a lot of research on the best way to remove it ourselves, etc. Of course the first step is to test for asbestos. The other day I decided to take some samples to test for asbestos. Unfortunately the samples showed that the ceiling contains 2-3% asbestos(crysotile). I don't know what to do now because I'm told that it'd be pretty unsafe to remove this on my own, plus I have to follow strict rules for disposing of the ceiling. And now it's totally out of the question to hire just a regular contractor to do the job because they can't deal with the asbestos. And of course if I hire an abatement company to do the job it's going to cost thousands. It's about 1500 sqf of pop corn ceiling. My guess is 5-10K if an abatement company does it. Plus we have to be out of the house, as well as all pets. It's a huge thing to take on both financially and the fact that we'll need to be out of the house and move our stuff. So here are my questions...first, anybody think that removing it ourselves is still doable or would we be idiots to try that? Next, do you think the best option is just to leave it? If you don't disturb the ceiling it's not dangerous...so I'm told. Or, should we go ahead and do the full abatement costing thousands and putting us and pets out of the house and having to move all our stuff? Any thoughts or suggestions here would be great.
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Old 02-20-2013, 12:47 PM
 
Location: TOVCCA
8,452 posts, read 12,751,555 times
Reputation: 12430
Live with it. Won't harm you that way. Really, how many people look at a ceiling?
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Old 02-20-2013, 01:39 PM
 
10 posts, read 54,160 times
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Well, you're right a lot of people don't look at the ceiling. But some do...especially potential buyers when we sell the house in the future. Popcorn ceilings scream, "dated". So it just depends. In reality yes, it's just a ceiling, but to some people popcorn ceilings just have to go. I'm some where in the middle on this, my wife doesn't really care one way or another.
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Old 02-20-2013, 01:45 PM
 
Location: La La Land
1,616 posts, read 2,165,633 times
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I was going to suggest sealing or covering it up and found this article:

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/12/ga...eady.html?_r=0

They also suggest covering with drywall. Maybe a sealant of some sort first, then drywall over it. Even expensive materials would still be cheaper than abatement.
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Old 02-20-2013, 01:47 PM
 
6,802 posts, read 5,483,717 times
Reputation: 1911
Lot's of things here.

When did you buy the house and when was it built?

Did the previous owner disclose that the ceiling contained asebestos?

Not sure on the health risk of a 2-3% reading, that seems a really low reading. I'm an insurance adjuster and have handled death claims resulting from asbestosis though. It's not pretty.

What's the size of the room? Cheapest thing might be to paint it and live with it, accepting you have asbestos in the house... You could also seal it in with drywall and texture and paint. Lots of old homes used to have 2 or 3 layers of asbestos tiles on floors that were otherwise ok as they were sealed in.

I'd want it abated personally. You will have to disclose it if you ever want to sell the house, or face potential liability for failure to disclose.

And I can't absolutely promise you won't have some exposure to asbestos...
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Old 02-20-2013, 01:52 PM
 
Location: Calabasas, CA
634 posts, read 897,238 times
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The only real way to deal with it is to hire someone to get that stuff out of your house. Do not try to remove it yourselves. I repeat DO NOT TRY TO REMOVE IT YOURSELVES.

Its one of those things where you just have to bite the bullet and pay for its removal.
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Old 02-20-2013, 02:04 PM
 
1,164 posts, read 1,423,742 times
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X 2 on Sennos last two comments. I'm not certain how long you plan to remain in the house but chances are it will appreciate more than enough to justify the expense of having the asbestos properly removed - and NO don't attempt to do it yourself! Your health and well being come first -
It would cost you a significant amount to have it covered with a layer of dry wall so the difference in cost versus removing it may not be all that much.
I realize it will be a big pain in the rear to vacate while the work is done but the piece of mind will be invaluable and it (the asbestos) will not be something you need to disclose when you sell.
Besides all that, it will look SO much better with that stuff gone!
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Old 02-21-2013, 05:33 PM
 
65 posts, read 248,392 times
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Search a thread titled "Asbestos in Popcorn Ceiling", you will find my recommendation on how to deal with it.

Good luck.
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Old 02-21-2013, 07:57 PM
 
Location: San Francisco
434 posts, read 910,995 times
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My impression is that the asbestos in the popcorn ceiling won't hurt you if left alone, at least if it's in good condition:

Protect Your Family | Asbestos | US EPA

Popcorn Ceilings - Should You Buy a Home With Popcorn Ceilings?

You can deal with it if you hate the looks of it, or if you think you'll get your money back when you resell ... but it doesn't sound like you need to deal with it to protect your health. (But please bear in mind: I'm no expert on this.)

If you do decide to deal with it, I can't see taking it on as a do-it-yourself project. If you've already moved your stuff in, I suspect that the real headache will be covering all your stuff and dealing with the mess of the work.

All popcorn ceilings aren't created equal. I've seen some that looked abominable, and others I hardly noticed. I'll admit, though: I've never seen a popcorn ceiling that I thought added anything to a house. It's always a negative, but sometimes an insignificant one, at least in my eyes.
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Old 02-21-2013, 08:04 PM
 
6,802 posts, read 5,483,717 times
Reputation: 1911
Quote:
Originally Posted by California Vagabond View Post
My impression is that the asbestos in the popcorn ceiling won't hurt you if left alone, at least if it's in good condition:

Protect Your Family | Asbestos | US EPA

Popcorn Ceilings - Should You Buy a Home With Popcorn Ceilings?

You can deal with it if you hate the looks of it, or if you think you'll get your money back when you resell ... but it doesn't sound like you need to deal with it to protect your health. (But please bear in mind: I'm no expert on this.)

If you do decide to deal with it, I can't see taking it on as a do-it-yourself project. If you've already moved your stuff in, I suspect that the real headache will be covering all your stuff and dealing with the mess of the work.

All popcorn ceilings aren't created equal. I've seen some that looked abominable, and others I hardly noticed. I'll admit, though: I've never seen a popcorn ceiling that I thought added anything to a house. It's always a negative, but sometimes an insignificant one, at least in my eyes.
I am not a doctor. Just a claims adjuster. But I have gotten a letter from an attorney requesting we advance death benefits to a living injured worker so he could visit his family before he died. The injured worker had asbestosis after working for shipyards and Hussman in Chino. We were Hussman and were the last employer he had, so we were very much on the hook.

I want that stuff abated legally, or at least sealed in very tightly. Please do not minimize the health risks involved.
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