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Old 04-01-2016, 03:04 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles (Native)
24,174 posts, read 13,685,578 times
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L.A. is resegregating -- and whites are a major reason why - LA Times
Saw this article from today and thought you guys would find it interesting..
Seeing how demographic trends in L.A have been going though..it's not shocking.

I think the article is probably not taking into account that whites and black oftentimes are moving out of the L.A area altogether though.
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Old 04-01-2016, 03:40 PM
 
23,254 posts, read 16,063,944 times
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The article is also undercounting immigrants who prefer to be around people who speak the same language.

Honestly who really cares about integration? It's pointless and meaningless. I'm against discriminating against people on the basis of race, ethnicity, gender, or whatever when it comes to employment, housing, and education.

However people live where they want to live, and clearly the government isn't going to be able to force 100% integration.

They integrated where they had either direct control (the military) or substantial influence (universities).

To tell you the truth this may be good for poor people. The neighborhoods that are mostly Latino and Asian will be more affordable. The less demand to be in an area the better.
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Old 04-01-2016, 04:07 PM
 
807 posts, read 658,193 times
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I agree with the article on some points but it's a bit loaded as well. I've posted a link to the guy's research paper at the bottom of this post.

In his paper, Bader states, "The unwillingness of whites (and Asians and, to a lesser degree, Latinos) to consider living in black neighborhoods is currently undermining housing markets in black neighborhoods. Therefore it is increasingly important to find policies that encourage whites to seek out integrated neighborhoods."

First off, it's pretty ridiculous for the author to act as some sort of authority on whether or not a certain group of people should move somewhere. He seems to be promoting integration solely for the sake of integration. In the context of LA, whites don't move to black neighborhoods in south LA because they are often very high crime. However, as of late, whites have been moving to wealthier black areas such as View Park/Ladera Heights. People are moving there because those are generally good areas, lower crime areas in relative proximity to jobs on the west side. Class and like-mindedness play a significant role in determining how people associate with each other.

While in the past white flight may have been a product of racism to a large extent, the bottom line is that people often like to live in areas with people like them. If I lived in an area where everyone started speaking a different language, set up businesses catering to a specific group and had a set of totally different customs, there's a decent chance I might leave.

For instance, the San Gabriel Valley has become heavily Asian because a few Asians first moved there and then others followed because they want to be with their fellow group who has similar customs, culture, and language. Some whites have probably felt out of place in the SGV and have left.

It's tricky to get a place like LA that is incredibly multi-ethnic to get on the same page. At the end of the day, some people just want to be with their own group while others are more open to mixing.

https://www.sociologicalscience.com/...3_135to166.pdf
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Old 04-01-2016, 04:36 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles (Native)
24,174 posts, read 13,685,578 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by socal88 View Post
I agree with the article on some points but it's a bit loaded as well. I've posted a link to the guy's research paper at the bottom of this post.

In his paper, Bader states, "The unwillingness of whites (and Asians and, to a lesser degree, Latinos) to consider living in black neighborhoods is currently undermining housing markets in black neighborhoods. Therefore it is increasingly important to find policies that encourage whites to seek out integrated neighborhoods."

First off, it's pretty ridiculous for the author to act as some sort of authority on whether or not a certain group of people should move somewhere. He seems to be promoting integration solely for the sake of integration. In the context of LA, whites don't move to black neighborhoods in south LA because they are often very high crime. However, as of late, whites have been moving to wealthier black areas such as View Park/Ladera Heights. People are moving there because those are generally good areas, lower crime areas in relative proximity to jobs on the west side. Class and like-mindedness play a significant role in determining how people associate with each other.

While in the past white flight may have been a product of racism to a large extent, the bottom line is that people often like to live in areas with people like them. If I lived in an area where everyone started speaking a different language, set up businesses catering to a specific group and had a set of totally different customs, there's a decent chance I might leave.

For instance, the San Gabriel Valley has become heavily Asian because a few Asians first moved there and then others followed because they want to be with their fellow group who has similar customs, culture, and language. Some whites have probably felt out of place in the SGV and have left.

It's tricky to get a place like LA that is incredibly multi-ethnic to get on the same page. At the end of the day, some people just want to be with their own group while others are more open to mixing.

https://www.sociologicalscience.com/...3_135to166.pdf
Yes I agree.
Speaking from my own personal experience , I moved to an area that is heavily Hispanic. I've been here nearly 6 years. I moved here because it was affordable to buy a house here at the time. I was working in Brentwood and I live in the valley. If I could of afforded a place close to work that would of been preferable.

People move more to neighborhoods based on affordability versus race.

I actually find the people that live in my neighborhood to generally be friendlier , more down to earth versus the people that live on the Westside.
The downside is higher crime, lack of amenities and things like that. Not the race/ethnicity of the people that live here.
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Old 04-01-2016, 04:46 PM
 
1,856 posts, read 2,039,840 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jm1982 View Post
Yes I agree.
Speaking from my own personal experience , I moved to an area that is heavily Hispanic. I've been here nearly 6 years. I moved here because it was affordable to buy a house here at the time. I was working in Brentwood and I live in the valley. If I could of afforded a place close to work that would of been preferable.

People move more to neighborhoods based on affordability versus race.

I actually find the people that live in my neighborhood to generally be friendlier , more down to earth versus the people that live on the Westside.
The downside is higher crime, lack of amenities and things like that. Not the race/ethnicity of the people that live here.
Maybe, but high crime and lack of amenities (and vice versa) correlates with the dominant race that lives a neighborhood.
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Old 04-01-2016, 05:09 PM
 
Location: West Hollywood
3,196 posts, read 2,353,016 times
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The article is sensationalizing what is essentially an economic trend. And it's not as though individual neighborhoods skewing one way makes a huge difference in Los Angeles. Everyone drives and no one stays in their one neighborhood 24/7, 365.
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Old 04-01-2016, 05:23 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles (Native)
24,174 posts, read 13,685,578 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MordinSolus View Post
The article is sensationalizing what is essentially an economic trend. And it's not as though individual neighborhoods skewing one way makes a huge difference in Los Angeles. Everyone drives and no one stays in their one neighborhood 24/7, 365.
Yeah good point . If one didn't know better they might think Brentwood has a high Hispanic population because there are so many working there during the day .

People should be free to live where they want .

No doubt many whites and others that can't afford the parts of LA they desire would rather move to another state and buy a new house in a safe neighborhood for less than they can in Pacoima
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Old 04-01-2016, 05:43 PM
 
Location: South Bay
7,091 posts, read 18,421,358 times
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i live in a neighborhood that is not very diverse in skin color, but is quite diverse in age and ethnicity/nationality. English is not the first language in many homes near me and many other homeowners have lived in their homes for decades. While my neighborhood is safe and quiet, it doesn't feel very neighborhood-y (if that makes sense). I know my neighbors a bit, but rarely speak with them, let alone say hi if we're both out front at the same time. I have a young family, but there are so few others similar to us in our neighborhood that I'm not sure my kids will be able to make friends that live close to us as they grow up. Point being, I get why people self segregate. I don't need all my neighbors to be just like me, but it's much easier to have conversations and build relationships with people you have things in common with. And while clearly you don't need this to get by, I do feel like my kids may miss a part of their childhood that I remember very fondly from my own childhood. having said that, i have no interest in moving out to bedroom communities like thousand oaks and santa clarita. I am unwilling to deal with that sort of commute. I will gladly stay centrally located in the valley and make it work for the time being.
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Old 04-01-2016, 06:40 PM
 
Location: Sylmar, a part of Los Angeles
3,439 posts, read 2,139,945 times
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Integration is the LA Times religion.
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Old 04-01-2016, 06:54 PM
Status: "Certified Victim™ who walked away" (set 2 days ago)
 
Location: Laguna Niguel, Orange County CA
9,111 posts, read 6,777,645 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
The article is also undercounting immigrants who prefer to be around people who speak the same language.

Honestly who really cares about integration? It's pointless and meaningless. I'm against discriminating against people on the basis of race, ethnicity, gender, or whatever when it comes to employment, housing, and education.

However people live where they want to live, and clearly the government isn't going to be able to force 100% integration.

They integrated where they had either direct control (the military) or substantial influence (universities).

To tell you the truth this may be good for poor people. The neighborhoods that are mostly Latino and Asian will be more affordable. The less demand to be in an area the better.
I will tell you who cares, this bloody administration and the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). HUD has promulgated a regulation that requires it to evaluate all neighborhoods in the United States. HUD considers areas that are lacking in diversity to have been caused by the communities themselves. Such lack of diversity in neighborhoods HUD considers to be evidence of a need for unspecified "proactive change".

Now as for the very term diversity (or lack thereof), it is a canard. Specifically, I have only seen HUD concerned about communities that are too white. Therefore, while areas like East LA or, say, Arcadia, could be 94% Hispanic or 87% Asian, I doubt we will see HUD action on those areas. Never does HUD express concern about housing discrimination other than when it comes to white areas. Words matter and crazy draconian integration (Utopian to them) policies envisioned by HUB workers in SE DC matter. In sum, we cannot say this doesn't matter when the government has designs on all white neighborhoods in America. Let's start with Westchester County in NY for a look at what HUD has in mind.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9KZJYO2XvpM

If we are going to truly once and for all move to a post racial society, these BS policies must end. I am all for fighting racial discrimination, but not for Orwellian policies.

For those who want to watch a full explanation of HUD's 'Fair Housing' assault on location communities, should watch it here.

Last edited by LuvSouthOC; 04-01-2016 at 07:12 PM..
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