U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > California > Los Angeles
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 04-17-2016, 02:13 PM
 
23,247 posts, read 16,056,508 times
Reputation: 8529

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by 3shipguy View Post
Who says fast food is going to catapult one into high-income industries? These jobs were meant for teenagers and college students trying to learn responsibilities and earn some income. For the most part, those with high incomes generally are highly educated or highly driven. Someone who treats a McDs job as a career are neither.
Very few college students work at McDonalds. Today if you do work as a college student ideally you intern or have something closely related to your field. You really don't want McDonalds on your resume.

As for high school students, there are restrictions for hiring people under age 18 so most businesses don't bother. Most of the people working at McDonalds are adults over age 18.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-17-2016, 02:16 PM
 
23,247 posts, read 16,056,508 times
Reputation: 8529
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3shipguy View Post
It may not determine how much you need to live on but it will determine how much you will get paid. Experience and education usually drive one's worth. The problem is that people treat minimum wage jobs as careers instead of stepping stones. A job at McDs was never meant to be able to support a family. Even their commercials show teenagers working the cash register and not someone of middle age.
An undergraduate degree can cost well into the six digits, and these days in a number of fields a bachelor's degree is insufficient. You'd need a masters degree.

That's a fantastic amount of money.

Let's also be serious. Not everyone is able to do well in college. Drop out rates are horribly high. College is not meant for everyone.

A huge percentage of the population will have to remain in retail or other low end services, and these people have to be able to support themselves.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-17-2016, 02:18 PM
 
Location: On the water.
10,315 posts, read 6,375,988 times
Reputation: 8593
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3shipguy View Post
Who says fast food is going to catapult one into high-income industries? These jobs were meant for teenagers and college students trying to learn responsibilities and earn some income. For the most part, those with high incomes generally are highly educated or highly driven. Someone who treats a McDs job as a career are neither.
Horse puckey.
Quote:
Almost half a million college graduates are working minimum-wage jobs, according to new government statistics.
There were 260,000 Americans with bachelor’s degrees earning the federal minimum wage of $7.25 an hour or less in 2013, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ newest annual snapshot of minimum wage workers. Another 200,000 associate’s degree holders also worked for that wage.
These figures are sure to understate the total number of people with higher education degrees who are working minimum wage jobs because data does not factor in state minimum wage laws that are higher than the federal floor. That means that likely thousands of workers in the 21 states with higher minimum pay rates are likely also degree-holders.

The glut of overqualified workers in minimum wage jobs is another piece of evidence against the common stereotype that such work is mostly done by teenagers who need to build a resume more than they need to earn an independent living. In fact, the vast majority of workers who would benefit from a minimum wage hike are adults who work to pay rent, cover hospital bills, and feed families. One in five American children has a parent in that group. Fast food workers — one of the largest subsets of minimum wage workers — are disproportionately black and female compared to the overall population.
Half A Million People With College Degrees Are Working For Minimum Wage
Do you understand the concepts "s*** happens" and "things change"?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-17-2016, 02:21 PM
 
Location: So Ca
13,866 posts, read 13,545,555 times
Reputation: 11793
Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
Very few college students work at McDonalds.
Not in CA. There are plenty of community college students who work there.

Quote:
Most of the people working at McDonalds are adults over age 18.
60% of its employees are under age 21, according to this website (2011). http://www.mcdonalds.co.uk/ukhome/wh...-under-20.html
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-17-2016, 02:22 PM
 
234 posts, read 134,767 times
Reputation: 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
An undergraduate degree can cost well into the six digits, and these days in a number of fields a bachelor's degree is insufficient. You'd need a masters degree.

That's a fantastic amount of money.

Let's also be serious. Not everyone is able to do well in college. Drop out rates are horribly high. College is not meant for everyone.

A huge percentage of the population will have to remain in retail or other low end services, and these people have to be able to support themselves.
So I'll ask again. How much should a 16 year old flipping burgers get paid. I've asked this 3 times now and not gotten a single response.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-17-2016, 02:26 PM
 
Location: West Hollywood
3,196 posts, read 2,351,854 times
Reputation: 5262
Quote:
Originally Posted by CA4Now View Post
60% of its employees are under age 21, according to this website (2011). What percentage of your employees are female and under 20? :: McDonalds.co.uk
That's the UK. In America 40% of fast food workers are over 25.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-17-2016, 02:38 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles (Native)
24,151 posts, read 13,675,815 times
Reputation: 11364
Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
An undergraduate degree can cost well into the six digits, and these days in a number of fields a bachelor's degree is insufficient. You'd need a masters degree.

That's a fantastic amount of money.

Let's also be serious. Not everyone is able to do well in college. Drop out rates are horribly high. College is not meant for everyone.

A huge percentage of the population will have to remain in retail or other low end services, and these people have to be able to support themselves.
No doubt bachelor's degree doesn't mean as much these days.
There are about 3,000 4 year colleges in the U.S.A alone these days
https://nces.ed.gov/fastfacts/display.asp?id=84
And of course many of them have thousands of students.
Something that is so common is not worth very much.

I believe education is important, but like you I agree that a 4 year liberal arts degree is not for everyone.
That being said, we really need to focus have an alternative to college that is better than working at a fast food place or retail shop for min wage.
Of course there are alternatives, learning a trade or starting your own business.

Of course the higher education industry wants to promote college and taking out bigger and bigger loans to get that college education because that's how they stay in business.

There shouldn't be a stimga against being a plumber , a lot of plumbers make more than 4 year college grads these days.

Bottom line, there are opportunities out there, different programs (opportunities) but a lot of people don't want to seek them out also or don't want to put in the effort.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-17-2016, 02:49 PM
 
865 posts, read 593,736 times
Reputation: 1284
Quote:
Originally Posted by MordinSolus View Post
Again, this is the real world. The adult fast food workers are real. And where does this notion that fast food workers are "supposed" to be teenagers and students come from? That's nonsense and it has no relevance whatsoever.
Nobody said these adult fast food workers aren't real. What's real (and sad) is that they are treating fast food as a career. Where's the aspiration to do better? Yes, some are down on their luck. Flipping burgers as temporary work makes sense. Doing it for a living doesn't.

As far as college education goes, that's a whole different topic. But I'll bite. Going into debt for education is a gamble just like everything else because nothing is guaranteed. But it is also an investment--in you. I'd rather gamble on myself than rely on some fast food franchise owner to help me skim by for the rest of my life. If you are flipping burgers as a career, you're making an investment for the franchise owner, not yourself. College is what you put in to it and the choices you make. No one told a student to go into debt majoring in art history. With that said, a Bachelor's degree doesn't mean as much as it use to--this I agree. I went into undergrad knowing that I would not just stop with a Bachelor's. I am well aware of student debt, as I am still paying off mine. But my gamble has paid off for me. It just took a lot of investment in time, determination, money, and faith.

One more thing, college isn't for everyone. That's why trade schools exist...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-17-2016, 03:45 PM
 
Location: West Hollywood
3,196 posts, read 2,351,854 times
Reputation: 5262
You speak in platitudes and still ignore reality. No one who's flipping burgers at age 35 is thinking that they have a lucrative career path and they're not doing it because they're lazy or because there are so many other options available to them. They're out of options.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-17-2016, 04:32 PM
 
865 posts, read 593,736 times
Reputation: 1284
Quote:
Originally Posted by MordinSolus View Post
You speak in platitudes and still ignore reality. No one who's flipping burgers at age 35 is thinking that they have a lucrative career path and they're not doing it because they're lazy or because there are so many other options available to them. They're out of options.
So what did they do the 14 years prior to turning 35? Sometimes when you make your bed... Plus there is still trade school. It's never too late to be a plumber. They make a decent living, if you haven't heard.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > California > Los Angeles
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top