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Old 07-27-2016, 11:40 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles (Native)
24,172 posts, read 13,685,578 times
Reputation: 11373

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Quote:
Originally Posted by CaliRestoration View Post
It'll never happen. K-12 in most states is controlled by leftist. The simple fact that the majority of democrat voters don't know how an economy works is precisely how they can pander for votes.
Yeah I'm seeing too much of the " we will take care of you " pandering .

I think Dave Ramsey said it best recently I heard him say

" None of these politicians have ever sent me any money " meaning neither Republican or Democrat.

I think both sides now are making promises they likely won't be able to keep , but they need to sell the idea that they will change people's lives for the better if they vote for them.
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Old 07-27-2016, 12:12 PM
 
Location: Downtown Los Angeles, CA
1,886 posts, read 1,248,261 times
Reputation: 2167
Quote:
Originally Posted by DenaDude View Post
I absolutely agree with you about residential renters.

However, it actually can suck if commercial rents go through the roof and push out all the old businesses. Obviously in general gentrification is going to be a good thing as it will eventually get rid of the pawnbrokers, tattoo parlors, head shops, XXX movie theaters, etc. However, losing amazing and cheap ethnic foods or grocery stores can be a sad day for the community.

And to tell a small business owner located in a strip mall he should have simply bought the whole building is a lot harder than for a renter to buy a condo or house in the same area.
I hear 'ya on the commercial forefront.

It is my personal opinion that the good outweighs the bad when it comes to gentrification. Even if my favorite pizza joint is replaced by a hipster infested coffee shop huddled underneath some upscale apartments/condos, it's (probably) bringing in a classier crowd and a larger tax base which can be allocated to community maintenance. Everyone can appreciate that.
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Old 07-27-2016, 02:35 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles (Native)
24,172 posts, read 13,685,578 times
Reputation: 11373
Quote:
Originally Posted by adr3naline View Post
I hear 'ya on the commercial forefront.

It is my personal opinion that the good outweighs the bad when it comes to gentrification. Even if my favorite pizza joint is replaced by a hipster infested coffee shop huddled underneath some upscale apartments/condos, it's (probably) bringing in a classier crowd and a larger tax base which can be allocated to community maintenance. Everyone can appreciate that.
Yeah I feel the same way for the most part. The lowering of crime ,especially violent crime I think is a very big benefit too and it's not just the new monied hipster class or yuppies that benefits from that either.

Gang bangers for the most part know where they can get away with certain behavior and where it won't fly.

When gentrification is discussed it seems so many only think of the negatives and the negatives are pretty much always exaggerated.
You just have to look at any 'gentrified' neighborhood like Echo Park and see that there's still a lot of low income people living there and also all the minorities have not been 'kicked out'.
In fact, many have benefited from huge increases in the values of those little homes they bought back in the day when Echo Park wasn't hip or cool.
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Old 07-27-2016, 02:37 PM
 
4,326 posts, read 2,197,761 times
Reputation: 3602
Heck, look at what Culver City was 25 years ago. I doubt anyone here would willingly live in that Culver City.

Now people practically consider Culver City "West LA".

Gentrification is good for the community, always. Anyone who thinks otherwise should be able to show me a community where gentrification brought MORE crime, LESS new business, and jobs.
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Old 07-27-2016, 02:45 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles (Native)
24,172 posts, read 13,685,578 times
Reputation: 11373
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaliRestoration View Post
Heck, look at what Culver City was 25 years ago. I doubt anyone here would willingly live in that Culver City.

Now people practically consider Culver City "West LA".

Gentrification is good for the community, always. Anyone who thinks otherwise should be able to show me a community where gentrification brought MORE crime, LESS new business, and jobs.
Yeah , I remember growing up Culver City wasn't viewed as desirable. It was not until the downtown Culver City redevelopment that people started taking notice and viewing it as desirable.
Also of course people got priced out of other areas.
Now people are priced out of areas like Culver City and looking at Boyle Heights.

One great example of gentrification lowering crime,etc is in Cincinnati . The over the rhine area of Cincinnati used to be one of the top areas for murders in the U.S

Long article, but really interesting to get an idea of what is possible with gentrification.

"It’s a transformation that’s happened in a blink of an eye, turning a neighborhood that in 2009 topped Compton in Los Angeles for the “most dangerous” title into something that looks and feels like Greenwich Village.

http://www.politico.com/magazine/sto...ization-213969

Last edited by jm1982; 07-27-2016 at 02:59 PM..
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Old 07-27-2016, 03:03 PM
 
11,493 posts, read 5,556,673 times
Reputation: 5949
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaliRestoration View Post
Because they don't understand how a "market" actually works. None of them have taken a basic macro/micro econ course. They rely more on how they "feel" about how things should be, which is neither useful or productive.

When you boil it down, these people are throwing temper tantrums.
Yeah pretty much, they don't understand how things work.


Quote:
Originally Posted by jm1982 View Post
Hard to say if the activists own anything . I know that "Serve the people " had some gibberish about the Senoras fighting for public housing back in the day , so perhaps some are getting a free ride at tax payer expense .
Hmmm wonder if that public housing and social services could be offered if there wasn't capitalism ..

Many of these groups seem to hate America or at least white people . Yet it's unlikely any of them have travelled to a Maoist or communist country.

Sorry but if you are going to " deny" capitalism .. This probably isn't the country for you.

Anybody that is renting in LA can afford to buy somewhere , maybe in a neighoring city or it might have to be out of state .
People have got to decide if it's more important to own property or to live in LA.

There seems to be some messaging in the political environment now that people should be able to live wherever they want as long as they work 40 hours , which isn't realistic . I heard this mentioned during the DNC convention

The numbers just don't work , and we can't be subsidizing that many people to live in L.A, Manhattan or San Francisco.
That's so ridiculous, then everyone would live in places like Lower Manhattan lol.


Quote:
Originally Posted by CaliRestoration View Post
It'll never happen. K-12 in most states is controlled by leftist. The simple fact that the majority of democrat voters don't know how an economy works is precisely how they can pander for votes.
I don't agree that Republicans are any better with that. If it was more common for poor Republican voters to live in gentrifying big city areas, you'd probably see the same sentiment with them.
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Old 07-27-2016, 03:23 PM
 
Location: Earth
17,449 posts, read 22,959,819 times
Reputation: 7246
Quote:
Originally Posted by jm1982 View Post
Yeah , I remember growing up Culver City wasn't viewed as desirable. It was not until the downtown Culver City redevelopment that people started taking notice and viewing it as desirable.
Also of course people got priced out of other areas.
Now people are priced out of areas like Culver City and looking at Boyle Heights.

One great example of gentrification lowering crime,etc is in Cincinnati . The over the rhine area of Cincinnati used to be one of the top areas for murders in the U.S

Long article, but really interesting to get an idea of what is possible with gentrification.

"It’s a transformation that’s happened in a blink of an eye, turning a neighborhood that in 2009 topped Compton in Los Angeles for the “most dangerous” title into something that looks and feels like Greenwich Village.

How Cincinnati Salvaged the Nation’s Most Dangerous Neighborhood - POLITICO Magazine
Culver City then might have been safer than it is now. It's never been a dangerous place. (Although adjacent areas were a lot worse than now.) The schools were better then than now - they're decent today, but back then they were still great. You still had the multigenerational middle class families there back then.

CC was "unhip", run down, and dull, and it was close to the hood, but it wasn't bad. I'd live in the CC of that era again.

That said, I think it is genuinely better now, especially for someone without kids. The quality of restaurants is higher, and the Metro is a godsend.
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Old 07-27-2016, 03:40 PM
 
4,326 posts, read 2,197,761 times
Reputation: 3602
Quote:
Originally Posted by majoun View Post
Culver City then might have been safer than it is now. It's never been a dangerous place. (Although adjacent areas were a lot worse than now.) The schools were better then than now - they're decent today, but back then they were still great. You still had the multigenerational middle class families there back then.

CC was "unhip", run down, and dull, and it was close to the hood, but it wasn't bad. I'd live in the CC of that era again.

That said, I think it is genuinely better now, especially for someone without kids. The quality of restaurants is higher, and the Metro is a godsend.
Culver City was a huge dump in the 80s and early 90s. I lived there as a young man during those years, and I remember Mayor Gourley used to talk about how embarrassed he was in the local papers at how run down the city looked, and how the amount of graffiti was unacceptable. Crime wasn't as bad as Inglewood, but it wasn't great.

Anyone who lived there during that time knows that the downtown revitalization project was the catalyst for the city turning around and eventually becoming gentrified which lead to Culver City now being very desirable to Angelenos. Gentrification changed Culver City for the better.
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Old 07-27-2016, 03:56 PM
 
Location: Earth
17,449 posts, read 22,959,819 times
Reputation: 7246
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaliRestoration View Post
Culver City was a huge dump in the 80s and early 90s. I lived there as a young man during those years, and I remember Mayor Gourley used to talk about how embarrassed he was in the local papers at how run down the city looked, and how the amount of graffiti was unacceptable. Crime wasn't as bad as Inglewood, but it wasn't great.

Anyone who lived there during that time knows that the downtown revitalization project was the catalyst for the city turning around and eventually becoming gentrified which lead to Culver City now being very desirable to Angelenos. Gentrification changed Culver City for the better.
I would agree with downtown revitalization changing things for the better, but crime was not that bad in those years. Unlike nearby areas, and not just those to the east either.

Last edited by majoun; 07-27-2016 at 04:57 PM..
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