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Old 09-17-2016, 07:23 PM
 
18 posts, read 11,260 times
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I am considering applying to some universities in the Los Angeles metro region. I am a high school student looking to get a bachelors. I want to become a Real Estate Developer, so a bachelors in Business Administration or Real Estate Development would be good, or something similar. I am a little over an average high school student as far as academics. I really wanted to go to USC, but I don't really fall into the criteria too well. Is it still worth a shot at applying anyways? What are some other universities that have good programs that I am looking at? Thanks!
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Old 09-18-2016, 08:53 AM
 
4,503 posts, read 2,774,296 times
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Are you a CA resident? How much can afford to pay in tuition?
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Old 09-18-2016, 09:35 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles,CA & Scottsdale, AZ
1,899 posts, read 1,516,738 times
Reputation: 1567
It is absolutely worth applying even if your grades/scores do not stand out. Those are not the only two criteria that USC looks at, essays and personal stories are very important too. I actually just graduated from USC and I have a lot of friends at USC who transferred in their sophomore year. If USC is where you want to be then here is some advice I can give you.
1. I know a lot of students who applied to a school in USC where they didn't really want to major in, but it was easier to get into, i.e. applying to be an English major in Dornsife but then transferring to the business school the next year.
2. If you don't get in the first time around and are still set on going to usc, go to SMCC or any 4 year college for that matter, and work very hard. If you get straight A's and have a good essay/show that USC is your dream school it is much easier to get into as a transfer. One of my best friends transferred his sophomore year from a school in Colorado and ended up transferring into the Leventhal School of Accounting.

At the end of the day I would go ahead and apply to USC regardless of your grades/test scores. I knew some kids who had "below average" test scores and grades and got into USC anyway, good luck!
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Old 09-18-2016, 11:24 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles
2,436 posts, read 1,333,684 times
Reputation: 2736
UCLA (no business undergrad program so perhaps econ)
Loyola Marymount
Occidental
Cal State Northridge
Cal State Los Angeles
Claremont Colleges
Pepperdine
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Old 09-18-2016, 01:01 PM
 
5,406 posts, read 5,657,440 times
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You dont need a college degree to be a real estate developer. You just need down payment for mortgage or construction loan. You can go to a local community college to learn all the rules and regulations. Or you can go to one of those real estate schools in some office building somewhere.
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Old 09-18-2016, 01:31 PM
 
3,780 posts, read 2,401,310 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Astral_Weeks View Post
UCLA (no business undergrad program so perhaps econ)
I was shocked to learn this. There's a Business Econ B.A. (which I would advise against - too much theory), but no actual Business Admin or pre-Business (like we had in UC Riverside). And this at a school that boasts one of the best MBA programs in the nation.
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Old 09-18-2016, 02:36 PM
 
Location: Eureka CA
7,596 posts, read 10,406,158 times
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I don't see any contradiction.
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Old 09-18-2016, 04:21 PM
 
3,780 posts, read 2,401,310 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eureka1 View Post
I don't see any contradiction.
How so?
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Old 09-18-2016, 11:54 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley, CA
8,293 posts, read 5,847,318 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by highlanderfil View Post
I was shocked to learn this. There's a Business Econ B.A. (which I would advise against - too much theory), but no actual Business Admin or pre-Business (like we had in UC Riverside). And this at a school that boasts one of the best MBA programs in the nation.
That's for a reason. An undergraduate education emphasis is more about learning broad skills - how to critically think, analyze, express yourself effectively and collaborate, as opposed to a trade school.

If you really are interested in business, the best preparation is to DO IT, get your hands dirty with practical experience. Undergraduate business degrees IMO are overvalued - when 20% of all college students are majoring in it, it's not all that unique.

MBA programs are more valuable because in order to make it work and meaningful, you have to have several years of full time work experience.
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Old 09-19-2016, 07:46 AM
 
3,780 posts, read 2,401,310 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silverkris View Post
That's for a reason. An undergraduate education emphasis is more about learning broad skills - how to critically think, analyze, express yourself effectively and collaborate, as opposed to a trade school.
And yet plenty of esteemed undergraduate programs offer business degrees. In fact, I wish my (liberal arts) college had - I would have been much better off with something that has real-world implications rather than an econ degree I ended up with.
Quote:
If you really are interested in business, the best preparation is to DO IT, get your hands dirty with practical experience.
Not an option for what I would venture to guess is a majority of college students.
Quote:
Undergraduate business degrees IMO are overvalued - when 20% of all college students are majoring in it, it's not all that unique.
It doesn't need to be unique to be useful. Plenty of college students are majoring in engineering, biology and chemistry - it's not how unique the major is, it's how in-demand it is. And business-related B.A.s are still in pretty high demand.
Quote:
MBA programs are more valuable because in order to make it work and meaningful, you have to have several years of full time work experience.
MBA programs aren't more or less valuable than business B.A.s - they are two completely different things, so it's unwise to compare them.
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