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Old 03-15-2008, 02:28 PM
 
636 posts, read 1,813,175 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aflyguy View Post
And here I am assuming the Valley still looks like what they show on the Brady Bunch. Honestly.
You can still find some Brady Bunch looking streets (nice homes, nice lawns) but some areas of the valley will make you cringe. Fastfilm or one of the other photo experts has posted pics of the valley on some of the other threads.

 
Old 03-15-2008, 02:31 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles View Post
The north side of most foothills is usually covered in green shrubs, some chaparral, and oak. (California is one of the few places on earth that has east-west mountain ranges: Transverse Ranges.) If you ever fly into Burbank look at the striking differences between the south side of Oat Mountain and the north side. South: Chaparral and wild grass, north side: green brush and (I think) oak and shrubs.

Transverse Ranges - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Also, often all that greenery is accompanied by humidity and bugs.
True enough. And SFV does have some pretty trees. I love the drive along Coldwater Canyon Boulevard.
 
Old 03-15-2008, 03:07 PM
 
493 posts, read 40,911 times
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I have heard the SFV is hottttttttttttttt...If I go to Los Angeles...I don't wanna be running my ac as much as I have to here in Texas...if I attempt to find an apartment in Torrance (South Bay...with Mediterranean Climate)...will I be good as far as not needing to run the AC...I mean electricity is pretty expensive out there...right? That being said Glendale looks really nice...I guess that is at the eastern rim of the good ole San Fernan
 
Old 03-15-2008, 03:44 PM
 
Location: Sherman Oaks, CA
5,102 posts, read 10,006,117 times
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Glendale gets hot, too. The only place to escape the worst heat waves is to live at the beach or within 1-2 blocks. Unfortunately, everything in that area is extremely expensive for obvious reasons. Not sure about Torrance's climate; maybe someone else can chime in on that one.
 
Old 03-15-2008, 09:57 PM
 
Location: Las Flores, Orange County, CA
26,362 posts, read 54,228,764 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by whitechocolate86 View Post
I have heard the SFV is hottttttttttttttt...If I go to Los Angeles...I don't wanna be running my ac as much as I have to here in Texas...if I attempt to find an apartment in Torrance (South Bay...with Mediterranean Climate)...will I be good as far as not needing to run the AC...I mean electricity is pretty expensive out there...right? That being said Glendale looks really nice...I guess that is at the eastern rim of the good ole San Fernan
It warms up to the point you would consider A/C from early July to mid September. It is much drier than Texas. Ceiling Fans, whole house fans, and simple el cheapo box fans work great in the evenings for all but one or two monsoonal events in August, each lasting about four days - You might want to run the A/C at night for those. There's a little more urban heat island effect these days from when I grew up in Canoga Park in the 1960s and 1970s.

I think the Santa Ana heat waves (hot, dry, itchy, annoying, edgy, windy) we'd get in November or December bothered me more than normal summer heat.

I grew up thinking Canoga Park was hot - until I went to Houston. That's a whole different kind of hot.
 
Old 03-15-2008, 11:33 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles, Ca
2,828 posts, read 3,285,778 times
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It's funny how some of the valley (burbank) still looks like Leave it to Beaver, the Brady Bunch.

I went to Bob's Big Boy in Burbank last weekend, what a great place. It's always packed. It's not rich over there, like Beverly Hills or Brentwood. But its clean and "normal".

Didn't the valley, even as recently as '85-90, look like it did in the Karate Kid or in ET? Thats what I think of when I think about '85-'95 valley.
 
Old 03-15-2008, 11:35 PM
 
493 posts, read 40,911 times
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Yeah, I was just hoping that I would consider "less hot" what a LA native would consider "quite hot" because the humidity just becomes ruthless...Houston has more humidity than DFW does I believe...
 
Old 03-15-2008, 11:40 PM
 
493 posts, read 40,911 times
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BTW...I was going to start a new Tarantino thread about sites that were featured in his first three movies...
Tolouca Lake appears in Pulp Fiction...you know where Tarantino's character lives...where they take the body and "clean the car up", the average price of a home in Tolouca Lake I hear is over a million dollars...the house featured in the movie...is that really Tolouca Lake...maybe there's no way of knowing...but are there normal houses like that there...or are they more like big movie star mansions...I hear a lot of celebrities live there...
 
Old 03-16-2008, 12:22 AM
 
Location: Cypress, TX
392 posts, read 1,205,624 times
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you have the big "celebrity" houses in toluca lake (due to the closeness of the studios), but you still have a lot of "normal" houses too.
 
Old 03-16-2008, 08:49 AM
 
1,398 posts, read 4,659,911 times
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To answer the thread question- YES, insofar as increased density has two pernicious side effects. One, it considers the nice little middle class homes with large lots, the American dream of the bedroom community for which the Valley originally was developed from its prior farmland, to be automatic teardowns to construct the highest density developers can create. This is allowed because of L.A.'s peculiar interpretation of "best and highest use," which is always maximum density to create more tax base. I personally think it would have been socially more important for our middle class families to have something nice, as initially envisioned, without "nice" being the extensive purview of the rich in L.A., which it now is.

Secondly, the Valley remains a magnet for illegals, who have no desire to abide by American cultural mores any more than they abide by our laws, be it trashing everything around them, or the end result of cramming multiple families into one family unit. This isn't poverty, this more often results from naturalized citizens or foreign nationals housing an ever expanding circle of illegals who are relatives or acquaintances. We are also a magnet for illegal criminals and gangs. None of these ever-increasing populations will ever abate, as Los Angeles is a so-called "sanctuary city" wherein perpertrators and suspects cannot even be questioned as to their illegal status. ICE is simply not allowed to do its work here.

Now on to the fun stuff. John23, go to the Burbank Bob's Big Boy on Friday nights to see the classic car/hot rod concours each week. Fun. Also, the S.F. Valley has long been utilized as locations for film and tv shoots due to a factor you've all forgotten: those larger lots. Production crews take up a lot space, and need access with large equipment. Our house has been used for mulitiple productions because of our large lot, and the fact that our 90 year old farm house, incongruously in the middle of the city, looks like Anyhouse, U.S.A. Other older houses in our Historic Overlay Zone in the valley are similar, but their subdivision didn't retain the larger lot access, so ours was used extensively in the 1990's when there was more scripted drama than reality shows.

Orion St. imimediately south of Victory was the original "Andy Griffith Show" Mayberry, and still resembles what much of the Valley looked like 50 years ago. It has retained its exact look because filming there for shows and commercials has become something of a cottage industry for its homeowners, enough to resist density development. ( The ol' fishin' hole of that show was the Franklyn Canyon reservoir in Beverly Hills.)

Lastly, it's funny you should mention Tarantino. Location managers detest him for having tainted their vocation. Normally, when a house is rented for films or tv, by law the production must be very truthful with the homeowners and describe exactly what is to be filmed, what stunts, etc. There are bonds to replace anything damaged, or that has to be rebuilt because of stunts. In the case of Tarantino's "Kill Bill," an unoccupied home for sale was rented for one of the girlfights. According to one location managers, the production absolutely trashed the house without having told the owners of their intent to do same. This backfired and has led to a lot of people with the upper class homes declining film production at their houses. Those of us with less fancy homes read the fine print, make deals, and then say yes, because productions usually pay quite well, minimum over 1K per day. One year in the '90's, our house paid for its own mortgage with film productions.

Last edited by fastfilm; 03-16-2008 at 10:00 AM..
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