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Old 04-14-2019, 01:27 PM
 
Location: Point Loma, San Diego, CA
1,166 posts, read 1,033,700 times
Reputation: 976

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jdawg8181 View Post
You do get what you pay for.


I'm from another expensive city, NYC and it's very interesting how different people are. I personally love NYC, never leaving - LA is just not my cup of tea. Had fun when I was there as well, but couldn't wait to get home. Just curious what didn't you like about NYC? It's not for everyone ... especially the rats, but you eventually learn to love them


I always laugh @ the people who say "come live here in ___, it's so cheap" ... it's cheap FOR A REASON. Any city with something desirable, is going to cost a pretty penny.

When it comes to low density sun belt cities, I agree. If you're leading off with "hey look how cheap it is", we all know what that likely means.

When it comes to the Rust Belt cities, it's not that simple. Almost all of them could make the argument that they could be charging more to live there based on the attractions and institutions they offer. Pittsburgh lost %60 of its population yes, but in terms of big-ticket amenities within the city limits it still beats San Francisco. You can still buy family houses in the middle of the city for less than 100k.

Similar arguments to be made in Cleveland, Detroit, Cincy. In many cases those cities are beating coastal cities in legacy amenities while undercutting the latest "hot" sunbelt megaburbia in cost.
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Old 04-14-2019, 02:44 PM
 
3,106 posts, read 3,819,708 times
Reputation: 2796
Quote:
Originally Posted by Losfrisco View Post
When it comes to low density sun belt cities, I agree. If you're leading off with "hey look how cheap it is", we all know what that likely means.

When it comes to the Rust Belt cities, it's not that simple. Almost all of them could make the argument that they could be charging more to live there based on the attractions and institutions they offer. Pittsburgh lost %60 of its population yes, but in terms of big-ticket amenities within the city limits it still beats San Francisco. You can still buy family houses in the middle of the city for less than 100k.

Similar arguments to be made in Cleveland, Detroit, Cincy. In many cases those cities are beating coastal cities in legacy amenities while undercutting the latest "hot" sunbelt megaburbia in cost.

One of these places is not like the others. Pittsburgh is one of this country's great little hidden gems. Everybody pictures it as basically what it is actually the opposite of - it's a tech-centric, white collar city with good crime rates and a lot of cultural choices. You take away the harsh winters, Pennsylvania's unpleasant tax structure, and make the airport something with better reach, and you've got one of the 5 best cities in America. Cleveland, Detroit, and Cincinnati...I mean, those are exactly what people think they are.
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Old 04-14-2019, 03:24 PM
 
Location: Kennedy Heights, Ohio. USA
1,770 posts, read 1,437,501 times
Reputation: 1396
Your own words :
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xanathos View Post
Ya know, we like it here so far, but I just don't understand when people say there's nowhere else they could possibly live (ESPECIALLY given the fact that most people I've seen say it aren't exactly thriving here - they're merely getting by). I mean, it's nice here, but the place has plenty of warts - we're not exactly in Atlantis. This is the first place I've lived (and I've lived all over the world) where I've found so many people that openly claim they lack any adaptability. Like really? You wouldn't be able to make it in Miami or Denver or Houston or something?

There for sure is a certain kind of energy here I've not found elsewhere in America, but it's always felt kind of more like a circle jerk to me than something tangible. It's easy to get caught up in it, but when you step back and look, a lot of it just seems to be Angelinos convincing other Angelinos how awesome being in Los Angeles is, almost like a group of people eating slop trying to convince everybody else at the table that it tastes just like lobster in a mind over matter trick. I don't know, maybe it's because we're not from here, or maybe it's because a lot of the unique glamour and glitz doesn't really resonate with us since we're not in that .01% of the population that gets to live it, and we don't get off on being merely adjacent to it.

We're here because we're being paid a fortune to be here, but dollar-for-dollar, I can think of at least 5 other cities just in this country we'd sooner live if we weren't drawing a salary that really allowed us to comfortably enjoy most of what the area offers.
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Old 04-14-2019, 03:37 PM
 
Location: On the water.
12,133 posts, read 7,187,974 times
Reputation: 9836
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xanathos View Post
One of these places is not like the others. Pittsburgh is one of this country's great little hidden gems. Everybody pictures it as basically what it is actually the opposite of - it's a tech-centric, white collar city with good crime rates and a lot of cultural choices. You take away the harsh winters, Pennsylvania's unpleasant tax structure, and make the airport something with better reach, and you've got one of the 5 best cities in America. Cleveland, Detroit, and Cincinnati...I mean, those are exactly what people think they are.
“Harsh winters” .... um ... not so simple. The winters aren’t terribly harsh there as harsh winters go in much of middle, and especially north middle, America. The deal on Pittsburgh is it has the nation’s lowest sunshine hours of any large city. THAT extends much fore and aft of winter.

And there you have Pittsburgh in a nut. Knock yourself out. Live there. “Tech centric” should work fine if how you spend your time is looking at a computr screen.
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Old 04-14-2019, 03:39 PM
 
3,106 posts, read 3,819,708 times
Reputation: 2796
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coseau View Post
Your own words :



...And? It jives with what I've already stated.
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Old 04-14-2019, 03:54 PM
 
243 posts, read 43,980 times
Reputation: 412
Quote:
Originally Posted by kttam186290 View Post
Another "Bash LA" thread because your last 4 didn't get the results you wanted?

You poor, put-upon, underprivileged white, "heterosexual" Republican, Christian-evangelical male...

It must be so terribly hard on you to share a huge metro area with brown people, black people, Asians, LGBTs, liberals, moderates, Pagans, Buddhists, Muslims, Jews, Sikhs and atheists.


Run along now, to white-bread, closeted, Christian, evangelical/Mormon, Phoenix!
k: but more importantly
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Old 04-14-2019, 04:02 PM
 
243 posts, read 43,980 times
Reputation: 412
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finper View Post
Pathetic.... you got nothing. I've lived in Ca my whole life. Santa Monica for 8 years. You name a area I've been there at least twice. And our great president has nothing to do with it.
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Old 04-14-2019, 06:10 PM
 
3,025 posts, read 1,717,579 times
Reputation: 1127
What's odd: San Jose has been ranking higher than L.A for best place to live, coolest cities and best performing cities. Couldn't L.A do better? I really like L.A. for its vibe. Why can't L.A rank higher as a city in terms of a cool place or place to live?
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Old 04-14-2019, 06:14 PM
 
Location: Sierra Nevada Land, CA
8,265 posts, read 8,956,658 times
Reputation: 12696
Quote:
Originally Posted by CA4Now View Post
As it says in the second paragraph of the article you linked, affordability--or lack of it--is a major factor.
Yet Bay Area Cities made the cut.
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Old 04-14-2019, 07:28 PM
 
Location: So Ca
15,154 posts, read 14,584,509 times
Reputation: 13110
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr5150 View Post
Yet Bay Area Cities made the cut.
See dvxhd's comment on post #76 (which is why I didn't bother to read the article beyond the first two paragraphs).
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