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Old 04-19-2019, 07:09 AM
 
Location: Sherman Oaks, CA
6,234 posts, read 15,324,709 times
Reputation: 8086

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https://www.latimes.com/business/la-...417-story.html

This law has been passed; no more discrimination based on Section 8. This infuriates me. I've lived in the same building as Section 8 recipients before, and it was a nightmare. They were loud at all hours of the day and night because no one worked, foot traffic at all hours as well (probably drug dealing), etc. One bad tenant can ruin a good building. I'm not prejudiced against poor people and I'm not racist. I don't like the people who game the system to take advantage, and who don't respect working tenants' rights to a quiet environment.

I'm moving out of the City of L.A. altogether if a bad Section 8 tenant moves into my building. I'm already starting to look at other areas. My commute to work will probably double or triple, but I can't live like that again.
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Old 04-19-2019, 08:31 AM
 
357 posts, read 124,230 times
Reputation: 446
Its these kinds of policies that continue to deteriorate the quality of life in this area. It's almost like they want to encourage these types of lifestyles. When I was growing up, it was encouraged to try your best, be your best, learn as much as possible, and shoot for success. Now sloth is ok and its pathetic. People should not be rewarded when they have not earned it!
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Old 04-19-2019, 09:11 AM
 
Location: Sylmar, a part of Los Angeles
3,788 posts, read 2,414,333 times
Reputation: 7940
Thats what happens with a liberal goverment. Keep on voting for Democrats
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Old 04-19-2019, 09:34 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles, CA
1,672 posts, read 2,485,856 times
Reputation: 1548
According to the Times article "76% of Los Angeles County landlords with units affordable to Section 8 tenants refused to accept vouchers."

That means 76% of those landlord passed up on guaranteed rental payments. From my understanding, Section 8 comes through with guaranteed monthly payments no matter how financially irresponsible the tenant may be for their part of the rent.

So if that many landlords of lower-priced units are passing that up then it tells you how many problems come with renting to section 8 users. Why not instead pass more protections for landlords who accept section 8 vouchers? Why not instead strengthen eviction rights for landlords when residents violate noise or other property regulations and disturb life for other residents?

This unfairly penalizes working-class folks who scrape by with multiple jobs to pay their rent and just want a quiet, safe place to live. Section 8 vouchers aren't moving into the shiny market-rate new places going up unless they are a set-aside affordable unit.
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Old 04-19-2019, 09:50 AM
 
Location: SoCal
3,553 posts, read 2,401,683 times
Reputation: 2702
Quote:
Originally Posted by timtemtym View Post
According to the Times article "76% of Los Angeles County landlords with units affordable to Section 8 tenants refused to accept vouchers."

That means 76% of those landlord passed up on guaranteed rental payments. From my understanding, Section 8 comes through with guaranteed monthly payments no matter how financially irresponsible the tenant may be for their part of the rent.

So if that many landlords of lower-priced units are passing that up then it tells you how many problems come with renting to section 8 users. Why not instead pass more protections for landlords who accept section 8 vouchers? Why not instead strengthen eviction rights for landlords when residents violate noise or other property regulations and disturb life for other residents?

This unfairly penalizes working-class folks who scrape by with multiple jobs to pay their rent and just want a quiet, safe place to live. Section 8 vouchers aren't moving into the shiny market-rate new places going up unless they are a set-aside affordable unit.
I read the main reason the didn't accept was the time it takes for section 8 to inspect an apartment, and they require it to be a certain standard. Meaning the landlord has to update their apartment to be adequate at the last moment.
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Old 04-19-2019, 10:27 AM
 
1,134 posts, read 831,383 times
Reputation: 1768
Quote:
Originally Posted by sean1the1 View Post
I read the main reason the didn't accept was the time it takes for section 8 to inspect an apartment, and they require it to be a certain standard. Meaning the landlord has to update their apartment to be adequate at the last moment.
That is the main reason for most landlords, but there is also a risk that if a poor tenant damages a property, they don't have any assets that a landlord could recover for damages. The other consideration is that most properties that are cheap enough for section 8 also are old and fall under rent control, making it more difficult to evict bad tenants. Landlords will adapt. A few will decide to convert to condos. Many more will do more strict screening up front- credit report, background check, application fees- to weed out those same section 8 tenants. Most smart ones will add a lot more restrictions to the lease so they can evict bad tenants. Some landlords will get burned before they learn their lesson. If you live in a neighborhood/building with high demand, I wouldn't expect many section 8 neighbors anytime soon.
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Old 04-19-2019, 10:50 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles (Native)
25,187 posts, read 14,941,264 times
Reputation: 12036
What landlords will likely do is disqualify based on other criteria .

From an article from the L.A Times editorial board that is pushing for this policy statewide ( surprise surprise )

“Property owners would still be able to screen tenants for rental or credit history, check references and set other common standards.”

Just seems like another symbolic thing to make it seem like they are “helping “ people .
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Old 04-19-2019, 10:54 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles (Native)
25,187 posts, read 14,941,264 times
Reputation: 12036
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texamichiforniasota View Post
That is the main reason for most landlords, but there is also a risk that if a poor tenant damages a property, they don't have any assets that a landlord could recover for damages. The other consideration is that most properties that are cheap enough for section 8 also are old and fall under rent control, making it more difficult to evict bad tenants. Landlords will adapt. A few will decide to convert to condos. Many more will do more strict screening up front- credit report, background check, application fees- to weed out those same section 8 tenants. Most smart ones will add a lot more restrictions to the lease so they can evict bad tenants. Some landlords will get burned before they learn their lesson. If you live in a neighborhood/building with high demand, I wouldn't expect many section 8 neighbors anytime soon.
Yup
Another win /cottage industry for the lawyers , there will be lawyers that specialize in creating these leases and helping landlords work around rule .

But the politicians will point to it as a “big success for the poor “
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Old 04-19-2019, 11:00 AM
 
Location: Formerly Pleasanton Ca, now in Marietta Ga
5,118 posts, read 3,899,003 times
Reputation: 6809
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texamichiforniasota View Post
That is the main reason for most landlords, but there is also a risk that if a poor tenant damages a property, they don't have any assets that a landlord could recover for damages. The other consideration is that most properties that are cheap enough for section 8 also are old and fall under rent control, making it more difficult to evict bad tenants. Landlords will adapt. A few will decide to convert to condos. Many more will do more strict screening up front- credit report, background check, application fees- to weed out those same section 8 tenants. Most smart ones will add a lot more restrictions to the lease so they can evict bad tenants. Some landlords will get burned before they learn their lesson. If you live in a neighborhood/building with high demand, I wouldn't expect many section 8 neighbors anytime soon.
Years ago sec 8 used to cover landlords for damages done to the properties. They stopped doing that. I guess they realized it was too expensive to cover those tenants that had no skin in the game. Those types have less concern over taking care of the property.
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Old 04-19-2019, 12:05 PM
 
Location: Business ethics is an oxymoron.
1,800 posts, read 2,210,559 times
Reputation: 3719
Yeah any landlord with even an ounce of common sense knows there are holes big enough to run a freight train through in order to circumvent Section 8 and not be accused of discrimination.

As others have said, establishing credit score minima is probably the easiest way to do this (even if the *real*, unstated reason is something very illegal and discriminatory). As far as I know, this is not illegal at all. So set it high. Like 720 or above. No person in the country that's eligible for Section 8 will be carrying a FICO that high. Problem solved.

Stalling with the application process because it was "incomplete" while betting a more creditworthy tenant will come along in the interim is another. In a hot, tight market such as LA, this also shouldn't be a problem for anything but the most run down buildings in the worst areas.

"Oops. Your application couldn't be processed. So it was put on hold. And awe shucks. Just your luck. Someone else came and completed one for themselves. Unit no longer available".
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