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Old 07-08-2019, 11:08 PM
 
Location: California
57 posts, read 25,251 times
Reputation: 41

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So, according to the internet and several statistics, Los Angeles is experiencing a decline in population, similar to New York and Chicago. I understand that people from expensive areas like here are moving out because its too expensive to live here and they want to move out. I also understand that it is the low income population that moves out. So I am wondering, where do those people move to when they leave their homeplace's population in decline, especially Los Angeles city and the county in particular?

Here is the link to show evidence:
https://www.cnbc.com/2019/04/25/los-...ill-grows.html

Maybe this is true, but according to some news webs, LA is experiencing a decline a population, which can hurt the economy and cause more financial problems in the future.
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Old 07-09-2019, 12:14 AM
 
Location: Studio City, CA 91604
2,708 posts, read 2,992,796 times
Reputation: 4852
A lot of this "decline" in population is younger millennial-aged people starting their own families and moving further out to Riverside and San Bernardino counties. Some probably even move north into Kern County as well. It pretty much says so in the article if you read it thoroughly.

Low-income people who are struggling tend to leave the state. Many are currently going to Las Vegas, NV because there are lots of available rental homes and apartments there, plus more manufacturing and lower-skilled jobs.
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Old 07-09-2019, 09:23 AM
 
Location: Orange County... Arizona bound
3,036 posts, read 1,656,178 times
Reputation: 4096
How can the population not decline?? It's a crowded too expensive cess pool.

A lot of young people are moving to neighboring states and Texas. States where they can succeed and buy a house or condo and start families
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Old 07-09-2019, 09:26 AM
 
346 posts, read 83,952 times
Reputation: 795
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2008user View Post
where do those people move to when they leave their homeplace's population in decline, especially Los Angeles city and the county in particular?
A lot of them just move to a different part of the region like
Orange County, Ventura County, Riverside County, San Bernadino County,

And from my memory the move to other western cities or cities with jobs and cheaper housing.

Phoenix, Dallas, Houston, Portland, Seattle, Las Vegas
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Old 07-09-2019, 09:31 AM
 
Location: Sylmar, a part of Los Angeles
3,997 posts, read 2,552,498 times
Reputation: 8566
Crazy homeless people all over the place attacking you, exposing themselves, human waste stinking to high heaven all over, vomiting, who would't get out.
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Old 07-09-2019, 01:05 PM
 
Location: Studio City, CA 91604
2,708 posts, read 2,992,796 times
Reputation: 4852
What would be really interesting is to see a region-by-region breakdown of which areas in L.A. County are "losing" population.

San Fernando Valley?
Long Beach?
The South Bay?
San Gabriel Valley?
Mid City?
Westside?

I don't think Santa Clarita or the Antelope Valley are "losing" population. If anything, both of those areas are gaining.

I suspect the population loss is in places like Eagle Rock, Highland Park, South Pasadena, Atwater Village, Studio City, Encino, Los Feliz, etc., as prices go up, wealthier people (who tend to have less kids) move in and replace the younger set of families with 4 or 5 kids.

I'm amazed at the sheer volume of demographic change that has occurred in Atwater Village the past 15 years. It went from a majority-Latino neighborhood to a majority-Anglo neighborhood.

Larger Latino families with 3 or 4+ kids are moving out to places like Fontana and Rialto, and being replaced by Anglo couples with 1-2 kids. That, alone, would account for the population loss.

This ranting and raving by our forum right-wingers about homelessness, vomit, etc., has nothing to do with it.
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Old 07-09-2019, 03:21 PM
 
346 posts, read 83,952 times
Reputation: 795
Quote:
Originally Posted by kttam186290 View Post
What would be really interesting is to see a region-by-region breakdown of which areas in L.A. County are "losing" population.

San Fernando Valley?
Long Beach?
The South Bay?
San Gabriel Valley?
Mid City?
Westside?
Those data are almost certainly available from the census but every now and then the Daily News or Orange COunty Register has articles about growth and lower level than the County.

Orange County adds 6,018 people as population growth slows to one-third the national pace

Is Southern California feeling crowded? Population figures say yes as region grows at fastest pace since 2014
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Old 07-09-2019, 03:50 PM
 
Location: Southern California
1,026 posts, read 1,118,468 times
Reputation: 2518
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finper View Post
How can the population not decline?? It's a crowded too expensive cess pool.

A lot of young people are moving to neighboring states and Texas. States where they can succeed and buy a house or condo and start families
I enjoy my quiet little piece of the L.A. cesspool near the beach, where I've lived and raised a family since leaving Texas many years ago. Anyone who wants to move to that State is welcome to it.
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Old 07-09-2019, 05:10 PM
 
Location: North America
1,156 posts, read 1,479,463 times
Reputation: 1248
The US Census does annual population estimates for states/counties/cities.
Here is a link where it breaks it down from state to county.
https://www.census.gov/data/tables/t...ies-total.html

LA County lost an estimated 13,000 people from 2017 to 2018. But all the other counties surrounding LA gained. Ventura only 200 people, Orange County 6K, San Bern county gained 18K, while Riverside county gained 33K. from 1 year. San Diego gained 18K. Kern county gained 8K.

I think the current housing situation plays an enormous role.
I was looking at population changes within incorporated California Cities. using this link
https://www.census.gov/data/datasets...and-towns.html


What I find is that Los Angeles City gained 8,000 from 2017 to 2018. It makes sense since there has been a lot of new housing built. A lot of "luxury"apartments, small lot homes, high rise condos in nearly every part of the city. Despite low income moving out, and more affluent moving in, Still the city of LA is still able to increase the populations with all the new housing built.
Long Beach being the second largest city in the county remained flat.
Almost all other cities in LA county lost population. 50 here, 100 there. and the biggest cities like over 500. It is like 0.5% loss which is insignificant but adding up 88 cities means like over 20,000 less people from people moving out to neighboring counties or states OR people died and fewer children or immigrants moving in.
But I think housing plays a big factor on types that move to LA County. Maybe childless couples/retirees versus families with kids.
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Old 07-09-2019, 06:05 PM
 
849 posts, read 785,359 times
Reputation: 1072
Bottom line is that LA and OC counties generally speaking are maxed out. You've already had decades of high growth, so in percentage terms, there isn't really much higher you can go.

Right now, it's a supply / demand housing problem, so unless cities change to allow for higher density multi-family construction, the narrative is going to be more about displacement than growth. There aren't that many more hills that can be razed down to make room for more single-family construction.
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