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Old 01-08-2012, 09:05 AM
 
Location: Bay Area, Calif.
2,435 posts, read 2,719,759 times
Reputation: 2579

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigdumbgod View Post
+1

Especially in this election year, we will revisit numerous times a truth that should be obvious: Denial of racism is the new racism.
Wow BDG! What a profound observation! I certainly agree.
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Old 01-08-2012, 09:19 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
69,278 posts, read 79,447,244 times
Reputation: 38636
Quote:
Originally Posted by SalParadise View Post
The nostalgia for the 1980's is quite funny. I grew up in LA County and was a teenager in the 1980's. I remember old timers back then talking about the "good old days"....as in the 1940's.

Those were the days when the San Fernando Valley (and San Gabriel Valley) were filled with Orange Groves and the sweet smell of citrus was in the air.

The 1980's was a time of tract homes and mini-malls. And high crime, bad hair, and bad smog.

I'll take the 1940's (or the 1920's) over the 1980's anyday. The days before SMOG became a common phrase. Smog didn't really start to be an issue until about 1943.
This has always been and will always be "remember the good ole days" I remember when my dad said he wished our house (built in 1953) was built like the houses in the 20s. Now I hear people say, oh to have a home built it the 50s, they had so much character and such good construction.

I have to say, the long gone citrus groves are sad. I grew up (before our new 1950s home) in an older home on about an acre with over a dozen fruit trees.
Nita
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Old 01-08-2012, 09:21 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
69,278 posts, read 79,447,244 times
Reputation: 38636
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Aguilar View Post
The levels of segregation described in your two following posts made it sound like Detroit with a good economy.
It was very segregated and maybe it was like Detroit. I never lived in Detroit. I will say, my remark about Detroit had more to do with the economy and the deterioration of a city than the demographics.

NIta
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Old 01-08-2012, 11:08 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles, CA
1,045 posts, read 1,542,473 times
Reputation: 690
Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
This has always been and will always be "remember the good ole days" I remember when my dad said he wished our house (built in 1953) was built like the houses in the 20s. Now I hear people say, oh to have a home built it the 50s, they had so much character and such good construction.

I have to say, the long gone citrus groves are sad. I grew up (before our new 1950s home) in an older home on about an acre with over a dozen fruit trees.
Nita
Nmnita: Yes, I agree. That is exactly what I was trying to say. The focus on the "good old days"....is an unending pursuit in futilty.

I have to agree with you Dad on one thing about the past: 1920's houses in LA generally have a lot more character than 1950's houses!

Of course, the air quality was BETTER in the 1920's, worse in the 1950's, and our current air is BETTER than the 1950's (but still not as good as the '20's).
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Old 01-08-2012, 12:11 PM
 
25 posts, read 36,208 times
Reputation: 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
sorry I disagree with you, it was more like the late 60s when the color barrior started to crumble. Yes, there was some mixed neighborhoods, but they were few and far between, no matter where one lived. Even Gardena was almost all white except for a handful of Asians. You rarely, if ever, saw a black or Hispanic person in Gardena until the late 60s. Blacks taking jobs froms whites had little, if anything to do with it...
I disagree with you. The whites and hispanics lived side by side at that time. What about South Central? It was more diverse with whites and blacks. They may not got along well, but I didn't see them beat each other up or say nasty things to each other.
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Old 01-08-2012, 12:23 PM
 
25 posts, read 36,208 times
Reputation: 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by majoun View Post
But why beginning in 1984? The crime rate was rapidly rising during the time period that you refer to.

And downtown LA during the 1980s was in pretty bad shape except for Little Tokyo. With the exception of Little Tokyo (and some adjacent places like Gorky's and Al's Bar) and Chinatown, if you were downtown at night in the '80s you were either a drug dealer, gangbanger, prostitute, drug user, john, or involved in some other sort of illegal activity. LAPD traditionally did not investigate downtown murders as they viewed downtown murders as controlling the criminal population. Many places that are very nice now were very scary in the '80s.

My guess as to why you cut off your time frame in '87 is because that's when heterosexuals started getting scared of AIDS. I'm surprised you didn't say the '70s rather than the mid-80s.
I totally disagree with you in a big way! The girls were the hottest I've ever seen for LA in the 80's. That all started to decline quickly by 1987 in a hurry as they all fled to other cities/states. Downtown LA was the epicenter of the hottest chics ever. Right now, it'll take 25 years of seeing hot ladies to make up for one night in Downtown LA at night club. There were a buffet of all the hottest women ranging from beach girls, models, playboy bunnies, supermodel like Christie Brinkley, Cheryl Tiegs and Kelly Emberg to hot Texas/Virginia/Utah and Oklahoma girls. Now, tell me where I can go to find these hot women anywhere in LA today in a cool club or bar? There ain't any now. You'll see Kim Kardashian and Lindsay Lohan.

Downtown LA was still the headquarters for banks and oil and insurance. It was growing and wasn't yet established as a moribund downtown until after 1990. Now, downtown is only now trying to recover without the hot chics. If there are, let me know. I doubt it!
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Old 01-08-2012, 12:36 PM
 
25 posts, read 36,208 times
Reputation: 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by SalParadise View Post
The nostalgia for the 1980's is quite funny. I grew up in LA County and was a teenager in the 1980's. I remember old timers back then talking about the "good old days"....as in the 1940's.

Those were the days when the San Fernando Valley (and San Gabriel Valley) were filled with Orange Groves and the sweet smell of citrus was in the air.

The 1980's was a time of tract homes and mini-malls. And high crime, bad hair, and bad smog.

I'll take the 1940's (or the 1920's) over the 1980's anyday. The days before SMOG became a common phrase. Smog didn't really start to be an issue until about 1943.
The mid 80's were time of seeing the hottest women ever in a one night period. Now, It'll take over 20 years of your life time to catch up or make up seeing the hot women that you would see in any given night at the club or bar during this period. You had the Beverly Center with Hard Rock Cafe and Pinafini as well as Tramp of London. In Downtown LA, you had Vertigo, Helena and Stock Exchange. At Vertigo, you had the hottest women of all time all crowding the place with relatively few guys, and they were friendly for the most part. It'll take years of your life to see all the hot women to make up for night at this club.

My favorite era is actually the 1940's to late 1950's with a good quality of life in LA and classy ladies. The 1920's are my 3rd favorite era. 1960's and 1970's are honorable mention. Now, it's the worst, period to be in LA.
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Old 01-08-2012, 12:38 PM
Status: "I had a handle on life, but it broke" (set 11 days ago)
 
1,322 posts, read 2,054,338 times
Reputation: 1671
Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
Before the 60s we hung out at Bob's Big Boy, skating rinks...
Nita
I would add drive-in movies and the beach.

Quote:
Why stop at 1950s ? Why not go back 100s of years ? LA was a true paradise then as it was uninhibited before some greedy Europeans arrived and destroyed LA #sarcasm# tired Of Old People Complaining About Asians And Mexicans.
Agreed. The blood rushes to my head every time that I hear this as it is embarrassing.

Quote:
LA is MUCH BETTER now that it was ever in the 50s.
I agree, but please don't chastise us for remembering fondly those days of fewer people and, of course, less traffic. Also, as has been mentioned by nmnita, that you could leave your doors unlocked and it was safe to walk the streets at night.

Quote:
The night I met him, at Fallbrook Mall in West Hills, he was the only person speaking English at Starbucks. *

So now, with the Internet, and all these Talent Shows like American Idol, seen worldwide, people from all over the world are flocking to L.A. **

Illegals, legals, and few speak any English, and they ' arrive ' in Los Angeles ....
*I worked in West Hills from 1986-2003, and ate breakfast in the mall virtually every morning. Some of my clients were from Iran, Israel, and Taiwan and they were highly educated and highly intelligent, but I can understand if they wished to converse among themselves in their respective native languages. I still think that you're exaggerating, though.

**People have flocked to LA long before American Idol, and in greater numbers. After WWII, many servicemen settled here, and how many viewers in states with real winters have fallen in love with SoCal when watching the Rose Parade on TV since it was first televised in 1954?

Quote:
I have to say, the long gone citrus groves are sad. I grew up (before our new 1950s home) in an older home on about an acre with over a dozen fruit trees.
We lived next to a citrus grove and a thoroughbred horse ranch in Granada Hills. The numerous chicken ranches also contributed to the feeling that we lived in "the country." Well, Nita, at least we have some fond memories of the past as we strive to create some in the present.
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Old 01-08-2012, 02:33 PM
 
Location: Earth
17,449 posts, read 22,953,730 times
Reputation: 7246
Quote:
Originally Posted by rack of lamb View Post
Downtown LA was the epicenter of the hottest chics ever. Right now, it'll take 25 years of seeing hot ladies to make up for one night in Downtown LA at night club. There were a buffet of all the hottest women ranging from beach girls, models, playboy bunnies, supermodel like Christie Brinkley, Cheryl Tiegs and Kelly Emberg to hot Texas/Virginia/Utah and Oklahoma girls.
There were some interesting underground nightclubs in downtown in the '80s despite the decay, and as I said before Little Tokyo was an island of safety and nighttime activity in an otherwise seedy and dangerous downtown. And there were plenty of Latino clubs downtown during that era. But that description of downtown doesn't fit the reality. The type of women you talk about didn't hang around downtown back then unless they were trying to score hard drugs - which were not unique to downtown. Sounds to me like you're talking about the westside, like the Sunset Strip or Westwood Village (both of which have become increasingly boring in recent years).

Here's one example: the Golden Gopher, which is now an upscale pickup spot with plenty of hot women, in the '80s was filled with junkies, dealers, and hookers, and Christie Brinkley or Kelly Emberg would not have been caught dead in there. Hot "Utah/Virginia and Oklahoma girls" and "beach girls" were scared of going downtown. OTOH you could've seen hot Osaka and Guadalajara girls back then...

Now, one aspect of downtown that was still going strong in the mid 80s which was not afterwards: the grindhouses on Broadway (as well as the Spanish language theatres throughout downtown, and a few Chinese and Japanese language movie theatres). There was also nightlife of an underground nature focused around punk rockers, artists, and various countercultures, which flourished downtown BECAUSE it had become so decrepit and scary to most Angelenos that there was freedom to put on events that would have been shut down in other parts of town.

Quote:
Downtown LA was still the headquarters for banks and oil and insurance. It was growing and wasn't yet established as a moribund downtown until after 1990. Now, downtown is only now trying to recover without the hot chics. If there are, let me know. I doubt it!
Downtown became established as moribund in the '60s, and actually accelerated further in the mid-80s period with crack becoming more widespread and gangs getting more out of control. There had been several attempts by the city of L.A. to fix up downtown under Bradley and all of them failed miserably. What finally caused downtown to turn around was the Red Line coming in. (The same thing that caused Hollywood, and the Noho section of North Hollywood, to start coming back)

Last edited by majoun; 01-08-2012 at 03:20 PM..
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Old 01-08-2012, 03:45 PM
 
25 posts, read 36,208 times
Reputation: 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by majoun View Post
There were some interesting underground nightclubs in downtown in the '80s despite the decay, and as I said before Little Tokyo was an island of safety and nighttime activity in an otherwise seedy and dangerous downtown. And there were plenty of Latino clubs downtown during that era. But that description of downtown doesn't fit the reality. The type of women you talk about didn't hang around downtown back then unless they were trying to score hard drugs - which were not unique to downtown. Sounds to me like you're talking about the westside, like the Sunset Strip or Westwood Village (both of which have become increasingly boring in recent years).

Here's one example: the Golden Gopher, which is now an upscale pickup spot with plenty of hot women, in the '80s was filled with junkies, dealers, and hookers, and Christie Brinkley or Kelly Emberg would not have been caught dead in there. Hot "Utah/Virginia and Oklahoma girls" and "beach girls" were scared of going downtown. OTOH you could've seen hot Osaka and Guadalajara girls back then...

Now, one aspect of downtown that was still going strong in the mid 80s which was not afterwards: the grindhouses on Broadway (as well as the Spanish language theatres throughout downtown, and a few Chinese and Japanese language movie theatres). There was also nightlife of an underground nature focused around punk rockers, artists, and various countercultures, which flourished downtown BECAUSE it had become so decrepit and scary to most Angelenos that there was freedom to put on events that would have been shut down in other parts of town.



Downtown became established as moribund in the '60s, and actually accelerated further in the mid-80s period with crack becoming more widespread and gangs getting more out of control. There had been several attempts by the city of L.A. to fix up downtown under Bradley and all of them failed miserably. What finally caused downtown to turn around was the Red Line coming in. (The same thing that caused Hollywood, and the Noho section of North Hollywood, to start coming back)
No no! Vertigo and Stock Exchange were in the heart of downtown on Grand Ave. Now, it's a condo building, 5 story. They tore them down in the early nineties. Stock Exchange was on Spring St. , I believe. Downtown LA was a knock out girl hangout at clubs, not drugs. I guess you weren't there. I'll stick to my choices. Downtown LA had the hottest clubs that NYC was envied. It proclaim the girls were the most beautiful in the world, and I agreed. I got to meet them myself and had a blast. Where can you find that now? Remember, it was a hip night spot, not a drug house.
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