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Old 01-16-2012, 05:53 PM
 
Location: GLAMA
16,584 posts, read 32,641,418 times
Reputation: 16781

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1950s Inglewood was miserable with the smog.
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Old 01-17-2012, 04:11 PM
 
27 posts, read 24,703 times
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1950's in LA: less traffic, more hot women, somewhat less developed, relatively clean, good beaches, friendly people and good vibe.


2012 in LA: horrendous traffic, dirty beaches, relatively highly developed, unfriendly people, dirty, lousy vibe and fewer hot women.

Choose your pick!

Last edited by leg of lamb; 01-17-2012 at 04:12 PM.. Reason: correct the wording
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Old 01-17-2012, 05:30 PM
 
Location: Altadena, Ca
18 posts, read 27,253 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SalParadise View Post
Well, I wasn't alive in the 1950's but I thought the smog started to be an issue in the 1940's and had become a BIG problem by the 1950's?

There was book called Smogtown that came out in the last few years, a sort of social history of smog in LA and the efforts to clean it up.

SMOGTOWN

From reading an excerpt, the first bad smog day happened during WW II and many residents initally thought it was a chemical attack by the Japanese.
Greetings,

I actually have a copy of that book signed by Chip Jacobs as he is one of my customers.

It's an excellent read and gives a detailed account in regard to the history, air quality, people involved and political ramifications.

I enjoyed the book immensely.


.
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Old 01-26-2012, 05:56 PM
 
Location: So. of Rosarito, Baja, Mexico
6,571 posts, read 17,949,017 times
Reputation: 5919
Talking LA smog...not really as it was called SMOKE back when....

The LA basin has always had a smoke problem of sorts going wayyyyyyy back.

THe Indians referred to the basin as "The Valley of Smoke" so it does have a history due to the mountains and the ocean breeze witch pushed the smoke/(current smog) against the hillsides.

Backyard incinerators were nice and as a result less trash to bury as with todays landfills.

Everything that would burn decades and decades ago was burned.

Cannot recall anyone finding old landfills full of debris from the past centuries.
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Old 01-26-2012, 10:19 PM
 
Location: GLAMA
16,584 posts, read 32,641,418 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Bagu View Post
THe Indians referred to the basin as "The Valley of Smoke"
Yang-na
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Old 09-05-2013, 06:46 PM
 
1 posts, read 2,015 times
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I was born in 1950 in Burbank, but grew up in Hollywood. I went to Ramona Elementary school, Vine Street Elementary school and lived across the street on Barton. I also went to Grant Elementary school. We lived all over Hollywood. Eleanor Ave, Tamarind Ave, Lexington Ave all homes within walking distance of Hollywood Blvd. We used to walk by paramount Studios almost every day. I went to Le Conte Middle School before moving to Garden Grove in the 8th grade. . In the summer we would go up to Hollywood Blvd and see movies. 50 cents would get you 2 movies in those days. All those old theaters with the velvet curtains and balconies. We would roller skate down Hollywood Blvd on the nice marble sidewalks and roll over the stars, and it would make a clickity clack noise as you rolled over them. Kids were safer then....no worries about kidnappers, perverts, etc so much. I went to school with a few kids that were on TV, and lived near a couple, Margaret from Dennis The Menace, Timmy from Lassie, and I was attending Le Conte middle school when Bye Bye Birdie was filmed there. I still remember a drug store on Santa Monica & Gower that had a old old soda fountain and you could get cherry cokes to die for there. We'd go to Santa Monica beach in the summer and drive through Culver City and see the big donut, and see the facade of Tara from Gone With The Wind, and go to POP amusement park and ride the roller coaster. Or we would go up to Griffith Park and the observatory. I remember the Hollywood Bowl, driving by it, and going to Carolina Pines Jr restaurant and getting rice pudding for dessert. I remember Music City on Vine Street and getting in to see Truth or Consequences sometimes when we had nothing better to do, and seeing Bob Barker. I remember my mom worked for tv station KTLA, and we'd stop by the lot after school, and sometimes get on the Bozo the Clown show and that Captain guy who had the cartoon show...can't recall his name, and the Harmon guy who drew and did the popeye cartoon show. I have so many many many good memories of growing up there. If anyone wishes to email me who grew up there about the same time, I would love to hear from you.

Nikki
[email]manikki2002@yahoo.com[/email]
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Old 09-05-2013, 07:34 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles (Native)
24,151 posts, read 13,675,815 times
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I wasn't around back then .. But I heard it was pretty groovy .. And a lot cheaper
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Old 09-06-2013, 05:11 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
69,275 posts, read 79,447,244 times
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I have to argue with Fontucky and the smog in the 50s. We lived in Inglewood from 1958 to early 1960, there was almost no smog. I was raised in north L.A. (Eagle Rock and Pasadena) now that was smog. The one thing we loved the most about living in the Inglewood area was the clean air compared to many places in Los Angeles basin.

Now, what was L.A. like? Well, for one thing, it was pretty segregated. Most ethnic groups could be found living among people they had something in common with and they didn't cross over the boundries much. Inglewood was pure White> Watts was Black, as was much of South L.A. Gardena was beginning to be heavily Asian; No L.A. was white. Lincoln Heights and east L.A. was Mexican, and West L.A. was Jewish. of course I am generalizing, this wasn't the case 100%. Immigration started appearing in the mid 60s and when busing became a reality around 1970 there was even more immigration, but also a lot of white flight.

The freeway system started to evolve in the mid 50s and that meant more families moving from Los Angeles city limits to the S. F valley and SG valley. Little towns became big cities overnight.

The Dodgers were a huge draw from the time they moved to L.A. The Rams were never as popular as some football teams, in other areas. Los Angeles was not a football town, like say, Green Bay or maybe Philly.

I suppose there are a million things we could say about L.A. in the 50s and 60s. I will say, the city was very different in 1950 than in say, 1965, but wasn't the entire country different..??

BTW, for any of you who think it was a lot cheaper, considering inflation, L.A. has always been on the upper edge when it comes to cost of living. Yes, in 1960 you could buy a new 3 bedroom, 2 bath home in the burbs (a new subdivision) with about 1200 or 1400 sq ft for $14,000 or $15,000but your salary, if you were a recent young college grad was probably about $500 to $600 a month. I know, we were there. Our first home was in Covina, it was about 10 years old, had 4 tiny bedrooms and I think about 1200 sq ft. The lot was 50 by 100. The neighborhood was pretty much working and middle class, mostly young families. We paid $13,500 for it, but hubby was making $520.00 a month and had to take a second job to make ends meet.
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Old 09-07-2013, 07:49 AM
 
Location: Southern California
25,341 posts, read 24,141,953 times
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How is it that I never saw this thread? It's wonderful! Thanks for sharing your memories, everyone.
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Old 09-07-2013, 09:30 AM
 
Location: So. of Rosarito, Baja, Mexico
6,571 posts, read 17,949,017 times
Reputation: 5919
Caught up a bit in reading some of the posts.

In the mid 50's would drive thru central Watts and stop at a all night donut shop for a cup of coffee and donut.

I was the only white person there at 3 AM but only got a second glance (rarity at the time) since whites were hardly ever there that time of night.

Coffee was HOT and the donut was delicious.
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