U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > California > Los Angeles
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 08-06-2016, 01:34 PM
 
508 posts, read 309,988 times
Reputation: 500

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
Interesting you would have used a CSUN, our daughter and her husband were both grads of CSUN> that being said, using a reference from someone, regardless of who wrote it or how things were documented is very different than living the experience. Heck by the mid 70s many white middle management males were losing promotions to minority women. Yep, that is the truth. But do you think you are going to find that printed in any reference book? Most likely not. Any research, regardless can be slanted to prove what the researcher wants to prove. So, let me assure you, those of us who have lived it, know first hand; we do not have to depend on finding out simply via a book or article.

No one is saying everything was perfect. we had problems, there was prejudice and some had it rougher than others, but overall, Los Angeles and the metro area was a great place to live and yes. life was good. Remember we are generalizing here, not claiming everyone or everything was perfect.

Unless you were black. Couldn't even vote in the United States. So lovely. Look up Jim Crow.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-06-2016, 01:35 PM
 
508 posts, read 309,988 times
Reputation: 500
I'm not going any further back than 1985.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-06-2016, 08:37 PM
 
Location: Earth
17,449 posts, read 22,978,485 times
Reputation: 7246
Quote:
Originally Posted by afropack-man View Post
Unless you were black. Couldn't even vote in the United States. So lovely. Look up Jim Crow.
Despite the undeniable discrimination and racism that existed in California, blacks in California were always able to vote. California was not Texas, Mississippi, Oklahoma, or Georgia. California did have a sort of Jim Crow but it was directed against Asians, and it was already gone by the '50s.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-07-2016, 12:03 AM
 
Location: West Los Angeles
8,849 posts, read 8,981,782 times
Reputation: 9096
Quote:
Originally Posted by Astral_Weeks View Post
You are all welcome to your "Leave it to Beaver" nostalgia....there was plenty of good in LA back then. But Disgruntled LA Native was making retarded claims about how life was better for ALL races in 1950 Los Angeles? That is a joke!

LA circa 1950 was not a good place to be black or a woman for that matter...of course, LA was not unique in that regard. This was the case anywhere in the U.S. at the time.

In reference to Compton:...the city was particularly hostile to Blacks when they first tried moving in. Policing strategies were designed to keep the "negroes" out. The "white racists" tried to keep blacks out through racially restrictive covenants....until the courts ruled them invalid in the late 40's. Granted, Compton was like the rest of LA County in this regard...racially restrictive covenants were used all over the county.

According to an essay by Josh Sides, the director of the Center for Southern California Studies at CSU Northridge, in the early years of World War II the Compton City Council resisted construction of a public housing complex in the neighborhood because it was considered "Negro housing." Mobs formed under the slogan "Keep the Negroes North of 130th Street." As with other areas throughout the region, they employed violent tactics, including vandalism and death threats, to keep Black families from moving in.

So no Klansmen in Compton but not exactly an open arms welcome either.
You SJW types will never rest until everybody hates every last facet of Western Civilization. Well, I will never hate Western Civilization, nor will I apologize for any part of it.

Do I or most White people go about lamenting over Kennewick Man or the Clovis People, and how the people who followed them across the Aleutian ice bridges engaged in ethnic warfare against them? You see, there were no segregated neighborhoods for them, or "Europids sit at the back of the restaurant" signs for them either -- no, they were simply slaughtered, and to this day very little remains of their culture other than the archeological finds at Clovis and a few other locations in the Americas.

And as far as racial restrictions in neighborhoods, that's something that is happening right now, but it's not being done principally by Whites. And I know you know that, but you just have a bias against White people which is why you're being so hyperbolic about what really amounts to small matters that ultimately, as stated, did not stop Black people from moving to Los Angeles.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-07-2016, 04:40 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
69,357 posts, read 79,541,504 times
Reputation: 38690
Quote:
Originally Posted by afropack-man View Post
It was great. Just don't be black or Hispanic.
the Hispanics had few problems in the 50s and 60s. As for the blacks, yes, you are right. We all remember or many of us do; the Watts riots. That says it all. It was the same, throughout the country until very late in the 60s and forward. the Jim Crow law wasn't a huge issue in So. Cal, but the region was very segregated with a lot of white flight.

Let me ask you, where did you get the idea blacks could not vote in los Angeles in the 50s?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-07-2016, 04:47 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
69,357 posts, read 79,541,504 times
Reputation: 38690
Quote:
Originally Posted by Astral_Weeks View Post
Just nifty nmnita. I see your "ageism" at work again. You do this time and gain. You have a disagreement with a poster and you use age as the reason why that person must be wrong. You offer no actual evidence or source to back up your counter claims....we just have to trust you because you were there!

By that logic, you yourself can make no valid conclusions about the Civil War or any other distant historical event because YOU weren't alive then either!

I will stick to actual historical analysis and an overall weighing of the historical evidence to make conclusions. Anecdotal information from someone who was there is just that...anecdotal. Possibly very interesting but still anecdotal. Often times the people who have lived an event do offer important insight but they are often filled with bias of their own. It can often takes decades to get a clear unbiased picture of events.

That is wonderful your kids went to CSUN...are they professional historians who have written books and done decades of research on the history of Los Angeles?
We will just have to agree to disagree on the subject; as for age, what does my age have to do with my posting and where did I refer to ageism?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-07-2016, 07:09 AM
 
Location: So Ca
13,911 posts, read 13,575,647 times
Reputation: 11841
Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
Any research, regardless can be slanted to prove what the researcher wants to prove.
It doesn't sound as if Sides was biased, though.

"No other community in South Los Angeles in that time utilized restrictive covenants to maintain the whiteness of their communities to the extent that Compton did. According to an essay by Josh Sides, the director of the Center for Southern California Studies at CSU Northridge, the Compton City Council during the beginning of World War II fiercely resisted the construction of a public housing complex in their neighborhood because they considered it, "negro housing." This campaign by the City Council received wide support throughout the community and mobs formed under the slogan, "keep the negros north of 130th street." Along with these types of rallies, violence and intimidation was also used in attempts to stave off the African Americans living too close to the borders of their neighborhood."
Civil Rights and Segregation - The City of Los Angeles
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-07-2016, 10:34 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles
2,436 posts, read 1,333,684 times
Reputation: 2736
Quote:
Originally Posted by Exitus Acta Probat View Post

And as far as racial restrictions in neighborhoods, that's something that is happening right now, but it's not being done principally by Whites. And I know you know that, but you just have a bias against White people which is why you're being so hyperbolic about what really amounts to small matters that ultimately, as stated, did not stop Black people from moving to Los Angeles.
I am biased against white people? I am 100 percent white dude!! I can trace my ancestry to this great land to before the American Revolution.

You are the one who is upset that a few posters suggested racism was an issue that confronted certain groups in LA's past. Quit trying to "whitewash" the past.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-07-2016, 01:40 PM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
69,357 posts, read 79,541,504 times
Reputation: 38690
Quote:
Originally Posted by CA4Now View Post
It doesn't sound as if Sides was biased, though.

"No other community in South Los Angeles in that time utilized restrictive covenants to maintain the whiteness of their communities to the extent that Compton did. According to an essay by Josh Sides, the director of the Center for Southern California Studies at CSU Northridge, the Compton City Council during the beginning of World War II fiercely resisted the construction of a public housing complex in their neighborhood because they considered it, "negro housing." This campaign by the City Council received wide support throughout the community and mobs formed under the slogan, "keep the negros north of 130th street." Along with these types of rallies, violence and intimidation was also used in attempts to stave off the African Americans living too close to the borders of their neighborhood."
Civil Rights and Segregation - The City of Los Angeles
This certainly could be true and we all know segregation was part of Los Angeles back then. I can remember in the small community we lived in (Eagle Rock) it was said blacks were not allowed on the streets after dark an there were no blacks living in ER at all. There were Asians and Hispanics. In Pasadena blacks were only allowed to live west of certain streets; I don't remember where the division was and this applied to Glendale as well. We lived in Inglewood in the early 60s right after we were married, blacks were only allowed in the community if they were doing work for residence, like housekeepers. So, I am not saying there was no problems. That is why I made the comment, I am generalizing when I mention it was a great place to live. I was more questioning someone who bases his opinion on something he read and claims he is right, everyone else is wrong.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-25-2016, 10:07 PM
 
1 posts, read 627 times
Reputation: 10
I grew up in SFV 1950. Roscoe Bl didn't go past the Van Nuys Airport. Northridge Auto Wrecking was at the end of Roscoe just east of Balboa, I think it stood in center of where Roscoe Bl eventually went. They moved over to Partheina St near Wilber Ave. I went to Lorne Street and then Northridge Junior and then High school.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > California > Los Angeles
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top