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Old 06-06-2010, 06:28 PM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
69,259 posts, read 79,447,244 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
L.A. in the 50's and 60's: smog worse, everything else better: top notch school system, top notch Univerisity of California, top notch standards for hiring in the LAPD. This was before political correctness.
yep, only the smog was a problem...I worked as a car hop one summer at henry's Right Spot on the corner of Colorado and Ave 64 on the edge of Pasadena. My parents lived about 4 or 5 blocks away. I would get off work about midnight (sometimes 1am) and walk home counting my tips. I didn't think a thing about any dangers. of course I was a silly college kid and wasn't afraid of anything.

Nita
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Old 06-07-2010, 01:46 AM
 
Location: Earth
17,449 posts, read 22,953,730 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
I hadn't heard the word in maybe 40 or more years. It does sound a little strange..like plunge into what?

Nita
There is at least one place where the word is still in use in SoCal, right near the last place I lived in SoCal:

Culver City > Government > Parks, Recreation & Community Services > Recreation > Municipal Plunge
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Old 06-07-2010, 02:03 AM
 
Location: Earth
17,449 posts, read 22,953,730 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles View Post
That was fascinating.
Priore, who does the Dumb Angel blog, has written books about the Beach Boys and a book that I just finished reading called "Riot On Sunset Strip" , about youth movements, rock music, nightlife, and the overall sociocultural context in 1960s SoCal, which for those of us like myself were children in the 1960s really does capture what made Los Angeles a magical place at the time. The book focuses on the Strip but covers the entire L.A. area (there's a great deal on East L.A. of that era which even most of the older people on this forum wouldn't have experienced most likely) and even goes as far afield as OC, the IE, Ventura, and SB. As I said in a thread on the California forum, the main thing that seems to have characterized that period which is gone now (besides the good economy of the time) is a shared sense of hope and a shared belief in a better future. One interesting thing about the book for me is that - unlike virtually every adult I knew and my own family when I was a kid, and unlike virtually every history of L.A. in that period - Priore doesn't demonize Sam Yorty. He views Mayor Yorty as a politician who was in a very difficult position not of his choosing due to the changes in L.A. at the time, who greatly valued stability, who had to walk a very thin line trying not to offend various interest groups and powerful figures, and who tried as best he could even if ultimately unsuccessful. This is a view of Yorty that I've never encountered in any other account of L.A. history nor from any people who were adults when he was active in politics. And here I thought the only people who held sympathetic views of Yorty were his own friends and family.
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Old 06-07-2010, 07:04 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
69,259 posts, read 79,447,244 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by majoun View Post
Priore, who does the Dumb Angel blog, has written books about the Beach Boys and a book that I just finished reading called "Riot On Sunset Strip" , about youth movements, rock music, nightlife, and the overall sociocultural context in 1960s SoCal, which for those of us like myself were children in the 1960s really does capture what made Los Angeles a magical place at the time. The book focuses on the Strip but covers the entire L.A. area (there's a great deal on East L.A. of that era which even most of the older people on this forum wouldn't have experienced most likely) and even goes as far afield as OC, the IE, Ventura, and SB. As I said in a thread on the California forum, the main thing that seems to have characterized that period which is gone now (besides the good economy of the time) is a shared sense of hope and a shared belief in a better future. One interesting thing about the book for me is that - unlike virtually every adult I knew and my own family when I was a kid, and unlike virtually every history of L.A. in that period - Priore doesn't demonize Sam Yorty. He views Mayor Yorty as a politician who was in a very difficult position not of his choosing due to the changes in L.A. at the time, who greatly valued stability, who had to walk a very thin line trying not to offend various interest groups and powerful figures, and who tried as best he could even if ultimately unsuccessful. This is a view of Yorty that I've never encountered in any other account of L.A. history nor from any people who were adults when he was active in politics. And here I thought the only people who held sympathetic views of Yorty were his own friends and family.
wow, I think I will check Amazon for it, sounds like something right up my alley. By the Way, yes, I did hear there was still a plunge in Culver City.

Oh, I also was a supporter of Sam Yorty, so was my husband and my father..We even switched our party affiliation to vote for him in the primary for Governor in 1966? or was it 68? We wanted a choice and didn't want to have to vote for an actor for governor.. Hubby had voted for Brown the first time he ran and yet couldn't continue supporting him.

Now, I wonder what life in Ca would have been like and throughout the USA had that actor not gone on the be a very popular governor eventually becoming our President?

Nita
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Old 06-07-2010, 07:31 AM
 
Location: Las Flores, Orange County, CA
26,346 posts, read 80,751,010 times
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Interesting how times have changed. I talked to my mom, who in the late 1950s and early 1960s was living in Burbank and would take the bus to her job at Glendale hospital. She told me there wasn't any shopping in Burbank so she'd take the bus to downtown LA to go to Bullocks (or something) to buy housewares and things.
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Old 06-07-2010, 08:09 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
69,259 posts, read 79,447,244 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles View Post
Interesting how times have changed. I talked to my mom, who in the late 1950s and early 1960s was living in Burbank and would take the bus to her job at Glendale hospital. She told me there wasn't any shopping in Burbank so she'd take the bus to downtown LA to go to Bullocks (or something) to buy housewares and things.
Charles, there was good shopping in Glendale though. yes, we too did most of our shopping downtown or in Pasadena, but many times went to Glendale from Eagle Rock.

Someone mentioned the ultimate was shopping on So Lake street in Pasadena. This was so true and then to have lunch at the Tea Room at Bullocks.

Nita
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Old 06-09-2010, 03:24 PM
 
Location: Earth
17,449 posts, read 22,953,730 times
Reputation: 7246
Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
wow, I think I will check Amazon for it, sounds like something right up my alley. By the Way, yes, I did hear there was still a plunge in Culver City.

Oh, I also was a supporter of Sam Yorty, so was my husband and my father..We even switched our party affiliation to vote for him in the primary for Governor in 1966? or was it 68? We wanted a choice and didn't want to have to vote for an actor for governor.. Hubby had voted for Brown the first time he ran and yet couldn't continue supporting him.

Now, I wonder what life in Ca would have been like and throughout the USA had that actor not gone on the be a very popular governor eventually becoming our President?

Nita
While he was mayor during most of the time I was in elementary school, I was too young to really make a judgment, except for the adults I was in contact with really hating him, and regarding him as an embarrassment.

Domenic Priore is on the political left in general (his book's very sympathetic to the '60s radical movements), which is why his view of Yorty is a surprise. Rather than the villain or "corrupt bastard" (the epithet I often heard adults say about Yorty as a kid) he's usually depicted as, Priore paints Yorty out to be more of a somewhat well-intentioned failure, a man who was not a bad person but simply not up to facing the responsibilities he had and the challenges he was faced with. Kind of like the Jimmy Carter of Los Angeles mayors . He's much more negative towards the supes (who have more power than an L.A. mayor, even more so back then under the old city charter - he especially singles out a man I'd never heard of, Supervisor Ernest Debs, as being an especially negative force) and Sheriff Pitchess.

Last edited by majoun; 06-09-2010 at 03:56 PM..
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Old 06-09-2010, 04:19 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles, CA
787 posts, read 1,622,673 times
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Majoun: Thanks for the tidbits about that book. Sounds interesting. Smogtown, by Jacobs and Reilly, covers the smog issue in So.Calif. from the 1940's to the present. I have not read it yet but it also looks interesting....a "social history of smog" in LA as described by the authors.

Perhaps the ONE positive thing that can be said about Ernest Debs is he was a big supporter of public parks and has one named after him near Mt. Washington (the 282 acre Ernest Debs Regional Park).

That said, my limited knowledge about him includes an episode with Jack Kent Cooke (then owner of the Kings and Lakers) who was seeking a long-term lease at the Sports Arena for his two sports franchises. Apparently, Debs was a VERY difficult man to deal with and during negotiations very gruffly told Cooke, "Take it or leave it." Cooke left for Inglewood and built the Forum.
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Old 06-09-2010, 04:56 PM
 
Location: Earth
17,449 posts, read 22,953,730 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SoCal35 View Post
Majoun: Thanks for the tidbits about that book. Sounds interesting. Smogtown, by Jacobs and Reilly, covers the smog issue in So.Calif. from the 1940's to the present. I have not read it yet but it also looks interesting....a "social history of smog" in LA as described by the authors.

Perhaps the ONE positive thing that can be said about Ernest Debs is he was a big supporter of public parks and has one named after him near Mt. Washington (the 282 acre Ernest Debs Regional Park).

That said, my limited knowledge about him includes an episode with Jack Kent Cooke (then owner of the Kings and Lakers) who was seeking a long-term lease at the Sports Arena for his two sports franchises. Apparently, Debs was a VERY difficult man to deal with and during negotiations very gruffly told Cooke, "Take it or leave it." Cooke left for Inglewood and built the Forum.
I'd never heard that story before. Everything I know about Debs comes from that book. From how he's depicted, he fit the public perception of Yorty (small minded, bigoted, vindictive, corrupt, Philistine, impossible to deal with, etc.) more than Yorty did himself - and he had more power than Yorty did. Debs, not Yorty, was behind the war on youth culture in the '60s conducted by local government and law enforcement (Yorty, according to the book, tried to walk a fine line between the establishment's view that the counterculture had to be stamped out and minorities kept down on one hand with attempts to reach out to youth, Latinos, and blacks on the other in the name of maintaining some sort of keeping the city stable enough for business - he failed at doing so, of course, but from how Priore depicts him he wasn't enthusiastic about being involved in the first place. Yorty did not have the negotiation skills that his successor, Tom Bradley, did, despite also being an attorney), and Debs was incessant about trying to "contain" nonwhites.

I didn't realize that Debs Park was named after Ernest Debs before I'd read the book given as I never heard of him. I'd assumed it was named after Eugene V. Debs.

Amongst the many things I learned from that book: I didn't know that Ventura Boulevard for a brief time was a hippie hangout after law enforcement put a damper on the goings-on on the Sunset Strip! There was an article from the L.A. Times magazine of 1968, WEST, quoted in the book saying "Ventura is the new Sunset".
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Old 06-09-2010, 05:13 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles, CA
787 posts, read 1,622,673 times
Reputation: 372
Quote:
Originally Posted by majoun View Post

1) I didn't realize that Debs Park was named after Ernest Debs before I'd read the book given as I never heard of him. I'd assumed it was named after Eugene V. Debs.

2) Amongst the many things I learned from that book: I didn't know that Ventura Boulevard for a brief time was a hippie hangout after law enforcement put a damper on the goings-on on the Sunset Strip! There was an article from the L.A. Times magazine of 1968, WEST, quoted in the book saying "Ventura is the new Sunset".
1) I thought the same thing for years...

2) Interesting...I grew up in the valley and did NOT know that. Granted I was in diapers in 1968 so would have missed out on that anyhow. It must have come and left there pretty fast.
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