U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > California > Los Angeles
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-09-2009, 04:24 PM
 
72 posts, read 238,205 times
Reputation: 86

Advertisements

I was wondering why it is that Los Angeles doesn't have many skyscrappers relative to its population. Miami's metropolitan population is barely larger than a third of LA's metropolitan populatoin (5.4 mil vs 13 mil) but its skyline is twice as big. Chicago also has fewer people than LA, buts its skyline is vastly larger.

Why is this? Is it because of earthquakes, or did the city just plan it to be that way?

I'm sure this has been discussed before, but I looked back in the threads and didn't find one relatinging to this topic. If I am beating a dead horse, please just reference me to a thread already explaining my question.

Thanks!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-09-2009, 05:00 PM
 
Location: El Pueblo de Nuestra Señora la Reina de los Ángeles del Río Porciúncula
13,912 posts, read 14,154,468 times
Reputation: 9888
Quote:
Originally Posted by cgadams View Post
I was wondering why it is that Los Angeles doesn't have many skyscrappers relative to its population.
It's cheaper to build out as compared to building up. For example, the growth of the San Fernando Valley in the '40s relieved the pressure to build more big buildings downtown. Until recently we've always had plenty of outlying area to build in. Well, we still have large areas of desert adjacent to Lancaster and Palmdale, and they too will probably be suburbanized perhaps 50 years from now.

As the population density increases there will be more and more building upwards. For example, the increasing high-rise construction along the Ventura Blvd. corridor and in Warner Center, both in the SFV.

And the word skyscraper has only one "P."
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-09-2009, 05:03 PM
 
Location: Northern Arizona
1,248 posts, read 3,005,690 times
Reputation: 624
Threat of earthquakes caused city officials in the early 20th century to cap anything over 150' (LA City Hall, 450' and built in 1928 being the lone exception). Meanwhile, LA sprawled to high hell and back, de-centralizing the city and its need for Downtown while places like Lakewood, the SFV and SGV prospered. LA had several skyscraper booms in the late 1960s-1970s and again in the 1980s-early 90s.

Despite its lack of skyscrapers (although compared to most other American cities, I'd say they've got a decent collection) there are a ton of lowrise but incredibly dense areas, especially around Broadway, the Jewlery District, Santee Alley and the Fashion/Toy districts.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-09-2009, 06:17 PM
 
Location: South Bay
7,092 posts, read 18,460,496 times
Reputation: 3323
skyscrapers do no a great city make. one example that comes to mind is paris. besides the eiffel tower and a relatively small business district which is technically outside of the city limits, there are no high rises in paris. On the other hand, there are dozens of cities in china that are filled with more highrises than you could ever imagine. however, paris still remains a world alpha city. I still don't think LA really needs any highrises at all. better planning in LA would have kept buildings lower and denser throughout the city rather than the few small clusters of high rises that we do have. this probably would have made for a more attractive and consistent looking city rather than the giant jumble that we have currently. i personally think that the modern highrises in downtown and century city are nothing more than the city trying to feel better about itself in the macro sense all the while ignoring the needs of its citizens. the city with the chip on its shoulder about its image is also the same city that tore up what was once the greatest urban rail system in the world, go figure.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-09-2009, 06:22 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles-213.323.310.818/San Diego-619.858.760
705 posts, read 2,998,751 times
Reputation: 441
Actually no, we do not lack in highrises. Los Angeles is number 8 in the total number of highrises amongst all cities in the world. The reason many people believe we lack highrises is because they have never been to L.A., basically. Most people just view downtown but never realize that L.A. has many districts with numerous highrises.

Top 10 Cities in our database # Highrises
New York City 5,754
Toronto 1,774
Chicago 1,100
Tokyo 1,042
Vancouver 604
Mexico City 596
Montreal 582
Los Angeles 559
Greater London 526
Hong Kong 511

Random Cities # Highrises
Sunny Isles Beach 55
Liège 26
Coral Gables 54
Liverpool 45
Leicester 15
Springfield 11
Baltimore 170
Fort Worth 63
Moscow 342
Enschede 25

Source: SkyscraperPage.com
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-09-2009, 06:32 PM
 
Location: Living on the Coast in Oxnard CA
15,374 posts, read 25,644,480 times
Reputation: 19655
Funny how the OP pointed to Miami. It is on the list but has 287 to LA's 559. I would venture to say that the buildings in Miami are built in the same general vacinity where as our buildings are spread out somewhat. Besides that, ever been to Miami? What kind of skyline would they have if they didn't build the buildings? Here in LA we have hills, a view of mountains (If the sky is clear.) We have things to see already. Why would we want to take the view away with a bunch of tall buildings. I think the same could be said about New York. You visit new York City for the view of all those buildings. What a view it is. Take all that away and what do you have left? In this part of the world someone builds a house on a hill and has an amazing view. How do you do that in Miami? You want to see for miles in Miami? You need to build up.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-09-2009, 07:03 PM
 
Location: South Bay
7,092 posts, read 18,460,496 times
Reputation: 3323
after seeing what surekrza posted, i'm curious to see the definition of a highrise is. i'm also curious to see how they counted highrises, ie city vs. metro area. although i think most people who visit LA underestimate the number highrises in the city because they are so spread out, I'm still having a hard time believing that the 559 number is totally accurate.

to me a highrise would be considered a building over 12 floors. i'm not quite sure why i picked that number, it just feels right. downtown probably has 40 or 50 in that range. century city has another 20 or so, and add another 30 for westwood and your at 100 for the cities largest business districts. even when adding in the buildings from the warner center and the wilshire center, as well as the few sprinkled in the mid-wilshire area, around LAX and along ventura blvd, i just don't see the number adding up to 559. Then what, do you count Beverly Hills, WeHo, and Santa Monica? If so, where do you stop, Long Beach or Irvine?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-09-2009, 07:15 PM
 
1,235 posts, read 2,058,359 times
Reputation: 1367
SurekRZA : The list of skyscraperpage is wrong, it only count the number of high-rises recenced in this site.

Skyscraperpage is english speaking so that's why North American city are well represented.
While Chinese cities are clearly not underrepresented.
Where is Shanghai, Beijing, Guangzhou all of these have far more high-rise than L.A, Montreal or Greater London ?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-09-2009, 07:34 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles-213.323.310.818/San Diego-619.858.760
705 posts, read 2,998,751 times
Reputation: 441
^^Do you have a better list?

Cities - SkyscraperPage.com

Last edited by SurekRZA; 03-09-2009 at 07:46 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-09-2009, 07:59 PM
 
Location: El Pueblo de Nuestra Señora la Reina de los Ángeles del Río Porciúncula
13,912 posts, read 14,154,468 times
Reputation: 9888
Quote:
Originally Posted by buckeyenative01 View Post
Threat of earthquakes caused city officials in the early 20th century to cap anything over 150' (LA City Hall, 450' and built in 1928 being the lone exception).
Not only is that wrong, it's plain absurd.

Quote:
The US Bank Tower, formerly the Library Tower and First Interstate World Center, is a skyscraper located at 633 West Fifth Street in downtown Los Angeles. It is the ninth-tallest building in the United States, the tallest North American skyscraper west of the Mississippi River, the tallest building in California, and the tallest building with a helipad on the roof (this is required by the city building code). Rising 1,018 feet (310.3 m) in height, it is also the 31st-tallest building in the world as of March 2008.
U.S. Bank Tower - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I picked just one building that I am familiar with in downtown L.A. that is a hell of a lot taller than 150 feet.

To add: The Westin Bonaventure is 388 feet. There are over 30 skyscrapers over 150 feet listed at this site (Wikipedia).

Seriously dude, you need to Google before posting.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > California > Los Angeles
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top