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Old 06-09-2007, 08:39 PM
 
2,886 posts, read 4,518,257 times
Reputation: 4905

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I know there are quite a few in Moreno Valley in the Inland Empire.

 
Old 06-09-2007, 09:24 PM
 
1,892 posts, read 3,622,995 times
Reputation: 1120
I am seeing more and more Blacks and Mexicans in West SFV. Up until a few years ago, mostly Whites and a few Asians lived here. Now those Whites and Asians are fleeing. Pretty soon the whole SFV is going to be the new South Central and MacArthur Park.
 
Old 06-09-2007, 09:33 PM
 
323 posts, read 305,918 times
Reputation: 112
I was reading an article which stated a lot were moving back to Africa.
 
Old 06-09-2007, 09:41 PM
 
Location: Mt. Charleston, NV
18 posts, read 128,724 times
Reputation: 15
Unhappy Thankful

I always thought that about 80% of the 47 million or so folks living in the Republic South Africa considered themselves to be "black," while a scant 10% of the folks there were classified as "white," with the remainder classified as "coloured", "Indian" or "Asian." When pressed for more detail, some South Africans have been known to describe themselves as "Afrikaner", "Zulu", "Xhosa", etc. With it's enormous diversity, the United States probably doesn't need to adopt South Africa's simplistic racial classification system. While you're free to use whatever terminology you please to describe different ethnic groups in the United States, keep in mind that certain terms are laden with history and that you run the risk of insulting certain segments of the population. In addition, some folks in the United States are quite happy refer to themselves as "European Americans." [/quote]

I am so thankful for your clarifying this. I think to use the word HATE in regard to a racial identity is hateful and hopefully won't be tolerated here. I am offended and hurt as a human being and for this to be permitted is wrong. "Hate" is not helpful or constructive. I believe the term African-American was created to identify both African and American ancestry. People may not identify as European-American but they do identify as Italian-American, Native American, Irish American, etc. I really like this site, people are good to people here. I am shocked that this hateful comment is permitted andthe member maintains high standing.
 
Old 06-11-2007, 05:41 PM
 
62 posts, read 283,662 times
Reputation: 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by starsandmountains View Post
I always thought that about 80% of the 47 million or so folks living in the Republic South Africa considered themselves to be "black," while a scant 10% of the folks there were classified as "white," with the remainder classified as "coloured", "Indian" or "Asian." When pressed for more detail, some South Africans have been known to describe themselves as "Afrikaner", "Zulu", "Xhosa", etc. With it's enormous diversity, the United States probably doesn't need to adopt South Africa's simplistic racial classification system. While you're free to use whatever terminology you please to describe different ethnic groups in the United States, keep in mind that certain terms are laden with history and that you run the risk of insulting certain segments of the population. In addition, some folks in the United States are quite happy refer to themselves as "European Americans."


This whole deal was brought up by some white person from South Africa who complained why Black people label themselves as "African" something. Why should we care? Even asking something like that is ridiculous. "African" is notoriously recognized as "Black", regardless how much white people from Europe moved into Africa and tried to colonize it into a white continent. Face it: you failed a long time ago. (like you really had a chance)

Anyway this is America. The only time we ever thought about South African politics is when we boycotted you for doing the Apartheid - that's it.

Now I hope we can focus on the original purpose of this thread, which is a question about LOS ANGELES.
 
Old 06-12-2007, 12:32 AM
Jag
 
7 posts, read 27,015 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by da jammer View Post
I know there are quite a few in Moreno Valley in the Inland Empire.
Didn't seem to last long, went back there not too long ago & didn't notice many at all.
 
Old 06-12-2007, 11:50 AM
 
Location: Toronto, Canada
128 posts, read 334,098 times
Reputation: 27
back to africa
 
Old 06-12-2007, 12:14 PM
 
Location: san francisco bay area
300 posts, read 1,391,055 times
Reputation: 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nijinsky View Post
Why I'm Black, Not African American
September 8, 2004

By John H Mc Whorter

It's time we descendants of slaves brought to the United States let go of the term "African American" and go back to calling ourselves Black - with a capital B.

Modern America is home now to millions of immigrants who were born in Africa. Their cultures and identities are split between Africa and the United States. They have last names like Onwughalu and Senkofa. They speak languages like Wolof, Twi, Yoruba and Hausa, and speak English with an accent. They were raised on African cuisine, music, dance and dress styles, customs and family dynamics. Their children often speak or at least understand their parents' native language.

Living descendants of slaves in America neither knew their African ancestors nor even have elder relatives who knew them. Most of us worship in Christian churches. Our cuisine is more southern U.S. than Senegalese. Starting with ragtime and jazz, we gave America intoxicating musical beats based on African conceptions of rhythm, but with melody and harmony based on Western traditions.

Also, we speak English. Black Americans' home speech is largely based on local dialects of England and Ireland. Africa echoes in the dialect only as a whisper, in certain aspects of sound and melody. A working-class black man in Cincinnati has more in common with a working-class white man in Providence than with a Ghanaian.

With the number of African immigrants in the U.S. nearly tripling since 1990, the use of "African American" is becoming increasingly strained. For example, Alan Keyes, the Republican Senate candidate in Illinois, has claimed that as a descendant of slaves, he is the "real" African American, compared with his Democratic rival, Barack Obama, who has an African father and white mother. And the reason Keyes and others are making arguments such as this is rather small, the idea being that "African American" should refer only to people with a history of subordination in this country - as if African immigrants such as Amadou Diallo, who was killed by police while reaching for his wallet, or Caribbean ones such as torture victim Abner Louima have found the U.S. to be the Land of Oz.

We are not African to any meaningful extent, but we are not white either - and that is much of why Jesse Jackson's presentation of the term "African American" caught on so fast. It sets us apart from the mainstream. It carries an air of standing protest, a reminder that our ancestors were brought here against their will, that their descendants were treated like animals for centuries, and that we have come a long way since then.

But we need a way of sounding those notes with a term that, first, makes some sense and, second, does not insult the actual African Americans taking their place in our country. And our name must also celebrate our history here, in the only place that will ever be our home. To term ourselves as part "African" reinforces a sad implication: that our history is basically slave ships, plantations, lynching, fire hoses in Birmingham, and then South Central, and that we need to look back to Mother Africa to feel good about ourselves.

But what about the black business districts that thrived across the country after slavery was abolished? What about Frederick Douglass, Ida B. Wells, W.E.B. Du Bois, Gwendolyn Brooks, Richard Wright and Thurgood Marshall, none born in Africa and all deeply American people? And while we're on Marshall, what about the civil rights revolution, a moral awakening that we gave to ourselves and the nation. My roots trace back to working-class Black people - Americans, not foreigners - and I'm proud of it. I am John Hamilton McWhorter the Fifth. Four men with my name and appearance, doing their best in a segregated America, came before me. They and their dearest are the heritage that I can feel in my heart, and they knew the sidewalks of Philadelphia and Atlanta, not Sierra Leone.

So, we will have a name for ourselves - and it should be Black. "Colored" and "Negro" had their good points but carry a whiff of Plessy vs. Ferguson and Bull Connor about them, so we will let them lie. "Black" isn't perfect, but no term is.

Meanwhile, the special value of "Black" is that it carries the same potent combination of pride, remembrance and regret that "African American" was designed for. Think of what James Brown meant with "Say it loud, I'm Black and I'm proud." And then imagine: "Say it loud, I'm African American and I'm proud."

Since the late 1980s, I have gone along with using "African American" for the same reason that we throw rice at a bride - because everybody else was doing it. But no more. From now on, in my writings on race I will be returning to the word I grew up with, which reminds me of my true self and my ancestors who worked here to help make my life possible: Black.

John McWhorter, a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute, is the author of "Authentically Black" (Gotham Books, 2003).
McWhorter is free to call himself Black if he chooses as as others of African descent free to call ourselves African American. He's one Black individual--a very conservative one as well--who doesn't speak for all African Americans. Not only has what we decide to call ourselves changed over time, the issue has been highly charged and contested. Depending on what time period in question, Blacks have referred to ourselves as "Colored," "Negro," "Black," "African American," and now some Black people like the label people of color even though it doesn't differentiate among the various groups. Some of us prefer African American and some Black. We're not a monolithic group.

As to where African Americans are going, some especially those who have roots in the South, are doing a reverse migration relocating to southern for the lower cost of living and better quality of life.
 
Old 06-12-2007, 12:38 PM
 
Location: Beverly Hills, CA
63 posts, read 169,973 times
Reputation: 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Is that rain View Post
Maybe LAPD got em.
Now why would you make a comment like that? If you cannot add to a thread in a constructive way, then don't allow your fingers to make you appear like a moron.

That comment was uncalled for, seriously.
 
Old 06-12-2007, 01:01 PM
 
62 posts, read 283,662 times
Reputation: 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by the point View Post
I was reading an article which stated a lot were moving back to Africa.
Can you provide the article to show you actually read that somewhere?

Most Black people in LA (and the USA) are not immigrated from Africa and therefore don't 'go back' (or even go to Africa at all).
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