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Old 05-14-2010, 07:56 AM
 
Location: Las Flores, Orange County, CA
26,362 posts, read 51,921,524 times
Reputation: 16208
Quote:
Originally Posted by coo77 View Post
Apparently plenty of people consider them livable neighborhoods.

Hollywood has 85,000 residents
Westwood has 52,000 residents
Koreatown has 124,000 residents
Mid Wilshire has 47,000 residents
Downtown has 40,000 residents
Santa Monica has 87,000 residents
.....
All these people are tourists?
What percent of these people can (or do) walk to destinations that provide daily/weekly products and services?
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Old 05-14-2010, 08:06 AM
 
Location: Las Flores, Orange County, CA
26,362 posts, read 51,921,524 times
Reputation: 16208
Quote:
Originally Posted by LASam View Post
I live in a very walkable part of West LA near Sawtelle. Most everything I need is within walking distance.

You are probably in the 5% who live within a reasonable distance (fifteen minute one way walk - one mile) to daily products and services in Southern California. And besides, who wants to spend 30 minutes of travel time to buy the small amount of product that can be carried by one person (in hand, on bike, or with a cart)? For example, There is a lot of benefit to buying a weeks worth of groceries - may be tough for a pedestrian.

There are other things, perhaps not positive, associated with living a walkable distance from retail. Noise from 5AM delivery trucks, parking lot lights, vehicle traffic in your neighborhood, and increased likelihood of "street people" venturing into your residential neighborhood.
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Old 05-14-2010, 08:23 AM
 
9,956 posts, read 13,637,052 times
Reputation: 5950
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles View Post
What percent of these people can (or do) walk to destinations that provide daily/weekly products and services?
I don't know the percentages, but given that many people in these areas (a majority in some of them) don't own cars, I'd say the percentages are pretty high.
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Old 05-14-2010, 08:25 AM
 
9,956 posts, read 13,637,052 times
Reputation: 5950
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles View Post
You are probably in the 5% who live within a reasonable distance (fifteen minute one way walk - one mile) to daily products and services in Southern California. And besides, who wants to spend 30 minutes of travel time to buy the small amount of product that can be carried by one person (in hand, on bike, or with a cart)? For example, There is a lot of benefit to buying a weeks worth of groceries - may be tough for a pedestrian.

There are other things, perhaps not positive, associated with living a walkable distance from retail. Noise from 5AM delivery trucks, parking lot lights, vehicle traffic in your neighborhood, and increased likelihood of "street people" venturing into your residential neighborhood.
Far more than 5% of southern Californians loive within a fifteen minute walk of basic services. I gather that you don't live that lifestyle or prefer it, but there are a lot -- I think far more than you realize -- people who do.
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Old 05-14-2010, 08:46 AM
 
Location: Whittier
2,096 posts, read 2,086,842 times
Reputation: 1499
I live in Los Feliz and can walk to the grocery store, library, restaurants and barber shop.

I like walking because sometimes driving can be a pain, and finding parking can be a pain. Plus it's good for you.

Yes it does take longer, but I can buy a couple of days worth of groceries, clear my head and get my heart going.
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Old 05-14-2010, 09:40 AM
 
916 posts, read 2,158,092 times
Reputation: 280
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles View Post
You are probably in the 5% who live within a reasonable distance (fifteen minute one way walk - one mile) to daily products and services in Southern California. And besides, who wants to spend 30 minutes of travel time to buy the small amount of product that can be carried by one person (in hand, on bike, or with a cart)? For example, There is a lot of benefit to buying a weeks worth of groceries - may be tough for a pedestrian.

There are other things, perhaps not positive, associated with living a walkable distance from retail. Noise from 5AM delivery trucks, parking lot lights, vehicle traffic in your neighborhood, and increased likelihood of "street people" venturing into your residential neighborhood.
I don't know if it's 5% but anyone who lives in a coastal neighborhood likely lives in a walkable one. And the coastal neighborhoods do a pretty good job of managing the "other things" you reference as not positive. It's not going to be as quiet as an inland suburb but I think that's a trade off most are willing to make as illustrated by the significantly higher prices for housing in the coastal, walkable neighborhoods.
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Old 05-14-2010, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Hollywood North
425 posts, read 624,668 times
Reputation: 684
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles View Post
You are probably in the 5% who live within a reasonable distance (fifteen minute one way walk - one mile) to daily products and services in Southern California. And besides, who wants to spend 30 minutes of travel time to buy the small amount of product that can be carried by one person (in hand, on bike, or with a cart)? For example, There is a lot of benefit to buying a weeks worth of groceries - may be tough for a pedestrian.

There are other things, perhaps not positive, associated with living a walkable distance from retail. Noise from 5AM delivery trucks, parking lot lights, vehicle traffic in your neighborhood, and increased likelihood of "street people" venturing into your residential neighborhood.
I think many people that live in walkable neighbourhoods walk/ride to get the things they need. This is reflected in the fact that several studies have shown that people living in walkable neighbourhoods tend to be slimmer than those who live in more traditional car dependant suburban areas. I personally would rather walk and take the half hour to get what I need and enjoy being outside, get some exercise and enjoy the energy of the pedestrian traffic. A car can be used to get to do large grocery shopping, however I go to the market several times a week as well since I want fresh fruit and veggies.
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Old 05-14-2010, 01:46 PM
 
Location: West Hollywood
157 posts, read 288,099 times
Reputation: 91
West Hollywood is a good walkable neighborhood. I usually walk for groceries, pedicure, breakfast, lunch, and even clubs at night to avoid DUIs. It's more convenient to not drive in traffic and I'm getting my 10 minutes of workout every time.
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Old 05-14-2010, 03:49 PM
 
Location: Las Flores, Orange County, CA
26,362 posts, read 51,921,524 times
Reputation: 16208
El Segundo is walkable for the most part.

There is another characteristic of walkable retail. It seems you'd have to go to six different mom and pop stores to buy six different things as a Target or Walmart or Costco wouldn't likely be in a walkable neighborhood. It's very convenient to be able to get just about everything you need in one place, or at least a mall anchored by a Target with a Bed Bath and Beyond, a DSW, a Kohls, Sports Authority, etc, all in one place. Big stores like that generally have a no questions asked return policy too - probably less likely for a Main Street shop.
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Old 05-14-2010, 04:02 PM
 
Location: San Jose
798 posts, read 1,192,027 times
Reputation: 611
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles View Post
Does anyone think these places are candidates for livable neighborhoods? Or, do these places seem more like entertainment or tourist districts?
I lived just off Melrose and Fairfax for 6+ years and found it very livable. Yes, Melrose itself is mostly tourist-oriented but it's easily enough ignored if you don't need its offerings. Pretty much everything I needed was within a mile radius or so, which is good because it takes a long time to drive much farther than that.

I walked regularly to:

- the gym
- library
- restaurants (it would have been stupid to drive 2 blocks)
- video store (this was pre-Netflix)
- bars and booze stores
- movie theaters

I drove to:

- grocery store (easier to carry more)
- work
- stuff more than a mile away
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