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Old 05-01-2010, 01:39 PM
 
Location: Destrehan, Louisiana
2,192 posts, read 6,537,064 times
Reputation: 3630

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Quote:
Originally Posted by WestbankNOLA View Post
Yeah, but no. Cajun culture is basically prominent in Acadiana, like always. Creole culture is prominent around New Orleans, like always. Creole culture is on the backburner recognition wise, but is prominent in the city's "elitist" crowd. All South Louisianians should be somewhat familiar with the two. The rest of the country sees the whole state as Cajun, just like back in the day the rest of the country saw both Creoles and Acadians as equally undesirable.


I love it when a tourist spends a week here and goes on and on about I'm doing cajun this and cajun that.

I love the look on their faces when I tell then that New Orleans in creole not cajun. They say that in the movies, everyone down here is cajun aren't they?

They look even funnier at you when you tell them that not all creoles are of color.

busta
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Old 05-07-2010, 09:49 AM
 
Location: City of Central
1,845 posts, read 3,912,999 times
Reputation: 951
So many myths about Louisiana , Cajuns , etc.
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Old 05-07-2010, 01:27 PM
 
Location: Southeast Arizona
3,269 posts, read 4,413,867 times
Reputation: 2278
Quote:
Originally Posted by mhounit View Post
So many myths about Louisiana , Cajuns , etc.
So true, I've already caught up on the history of New Orleans for the trip there this summer, "Nawlins" is Creole (maybe also slight Cajun) with African and Carribean flavor all over it. But for all I know is that the "Cajuns" are around 50 miles west of the city to the Texas state line.

The one thing about the state that isn't a myth is the beauty of it (or so I've seen in pictures and movies).
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Old 05-08-2010, 04:36 AM
 
Location: France (southwest)
1 posts, read 2,197 times
Reputation: 10
Smile Bonjour tout le monde

Please excuse my bad English.

I was looking for informations about the terrible evenement witch arrives on your beautyfull coast. I have pass long time to read forum, and I felt on this topic... I would just like to give a link towards an interressante page about History of Louisiane :

[URL]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louisiana_(New_France)[/URL]

It seems seriously with much informations...

I would also like to temoigner you my biggest sadness and my solidarity in front of misfortune which arrives at you...

I'm thinking to your very precious ecosystème, its fragility... I hope that you can save it.

Last edited by maeva; 05-08-2010 at 04:38 AM.. Reason: fix link
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Old 04-24-2015, 09:17 AM
 
1 posts, read 1,449 times
Reputation: 16
1718 New Orleans is founded. From 1719 through the 1720's, 21 ships directly from Africa land in the our colony. By 1732 the Black pop. is 2 to 1. (Midlo-Hall, 160) Could be LA's biggest, oldest Creole pop. Opelousas/Attakapas (Acadiana) grew with many retired French military growing the cattle industry with the help of a number of Creoles of Senegambian descent and Acadian refugees. LA Planters kept track of who was from where, the biggest (3% over time) were Wolofs (LA's Senegals) in SW LA. 1810 US census Attakapas (5 parishes today): 21.16 White, 31.02 Free Black and 47.82 LA Creole Slave with some Africans. Opelousas (8 parishes today): 13.71 White, 57.23 Free Black, 29.06 Slave. (Brasseaux, Fontenot, Oubre 1994, 9) This is a LA French speaking pop. of white French military, courir de bois, Wolons, Germans etc.; cowboys are majority Black Creole like Cyprian Jean. (Sluyter, 2012). D'Jalma Garnier, Carencro
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Old 04-24-2015, 12:20 PM
 
Location: Jamestown, NY
7,841 posts, read 7,958,628 times
Reputation: 13779
Thanks for one of the most informative threads on C-D in a while! Or should I say, merci?
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Old 04-24-2015, 04:51 PM
 
7,433 posts, read 4,438,025 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhounit View Post
So many myths about Louisiana , Cajuns , etc.
Ain't that the truth!

So much work to and so little time...

First there are two definitions for Creoles, the Spanish and the French designated anyone born in the New World as being Creoles, over time that definition was reserved for persons of color who shall we say, were a blending of European and African heritage enough so that when placed up side a brown paper bag came out on the lighter side of the comparison. Personally, I think it was just too much for more race conscious Americans to keep track of who was an Octaroon, a Quadroon or just a person of African descent when it came to figuring out who actually belonged at the back of the streetcar, so Creole simply sufficed.

As for Cajuns, well they were them swamp folks who live in the South west corner of the state, which in popular parlance were just called Coonasses which says a lot about Protestant northern Louisiana because if a black person was a coon, what do you consider a coon's ass?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bel et Intelligent View Post
Yea I understand there are more Cajuns in the area but, I wish Creole people got more recognition for our part in molding the culture.
I doubt that it is true that there were ever more Cajuns in Louisiana than Creoles, mixed raced black folks (see Homer Plessy). But I do believe that when it came to branding, Cajuns had the natural edge. First they were white, second they had Justin "oooh weee" Wilson. Now Justin didn't cook a thing that my Creole grandmother didn't cook so as for:

Quote:
Alot of food, spices, and recipes come from Creole people. I'm not trying to start a fight between our people, I just wish we had a little bit more recognition
Quote:
Originally Posted by green_mariner View Post
I would say the difference between Cajun food and Creole food is that Cajun food is very spicy. Creole food tends to use more butter fat and cream.
There ain't a lick of difference except that Creole cooks had to be a little refined since they adopted the same food items and recipes for richer pallets. But the bottom line, oysters are oysters, shrimp are shrimp, catfish are catfish, and thank god crawfish are crawfish.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bustaduke View Post
Don't think the Cajuns were respected or received recognition at first. In fact most were even taught to stop speaking French and to start speaking English in school and be more American.

It took years for Cajuns to receive recognition and it was achieved through hard work and to never give up hope. Even to this day some people still look down on Cajuns as a second class of people, but all in all I think they are respected and receive recognition for their part in Louisiana history.
Again, credit has to go to Justin Wilson but BuckWheat Zydeco, Michael Doucet, Rockin' Dopsie, Clifton Chenier, and the Louisiana Jazz and Heritage Fair.

Quote:
From the Cajun Dome to Cajun food the name really sales itself, I think Creole will always take a back seat to Cajun culture. I dont mind that as long as the creole culture doesnt get lost.. Here is the national flag for the French Creole of Louisiana
As a New Orleanian in exile, I am constantly challenging any eating establishment that dares to put the word Cajun anywhere on their menu, and so far only one has past my standards (hmmm maybe I'll start a Louisiana version of the Michelin Star).

One last thing, talking about not getting their due... Leah Chase vs Paul Prudhomme no freaking contest. Miss Chase vs Emeril "Fall River, Massachusetts" Lagasse... the boy couldn't clean her grill.
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Old 04-24-2015, 05:52 PM
 
Location: New Orleans, LA
1,291 posts, read 1,305,921 times
Reputation: 745
Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda_d View Post
Thanks for one of the most informative threads on C-D in a while! Or should I say, merci?
d'accord!

I wish the area still spoke french like it did a couple generations ago. If it wasn't for my grandpa marrying someone outside of south Louisiana it would probably be my first language. Everybody thought the Acadians were second class largely because of the language. A lot of people really put pressure on South Louisiana to learn English. It's kinda crappy that we (Cajuns) started being liked as soon as we started speaking English.

It's making a comeback ... 4,000 kids are enrolled in French schools in Louisiana, more than any other state.

BTW my grandma used to look at my mother like she was trash when she spoke cajun french. I never got to pick any of it up aside from a few words. Ironically my grandmother is english, the same descendents that exiled the Acadians to South Louisiana.
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Old 04-24-2015, 06:16 PM
 
7,433 posts, read 4,438,025 times
Reputation: 9232
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mwahfromtheheart View Post
It's kinda crappy that we (Cajuns) started being liked as soon as we started speaking English.
Heh cher you call dat, you speak anglish?

Well at least you don't wash your shrimps in da zink, or make your groceries.

Seriously, back in the seventies I knew a bunch of young French kids who got hired to teach Cajun kids. I found it funny because it was around the same time everybody was making a fuss about bi-lingual education but no one seem to notice that the Cajuns had strong bi-lingual programs going on in Cajun country, thank god.
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Old 04-24-2015, 10:41 PM
 
Location: New Orleans, LA
1,291 posts, read 1,305,921 times
Reputation: 745
My great granma and dem made beaucoup shrimps and crabs just fine washin dem in da sink. Der gumbo was better dan anybodies and dey aint hat no Walmart.

The push to start English was in the early 1900s. It hadn't hit Lafourche Parish (or at least near Lockport) in the 1930s. At the turn of the century, french speaking children were mistreated in American public schools and for the longest time being cajun or coonass was a slur or socially looked down on by a lot of people, even creoles.

I think it's kinda messed up how the Acadians always seem to be the first ones to get punished for their culture on this land in some way ... We were exiled to specific lands before the Native Americans were and were punished for our language just like those who prefer to speak Spanish are being frowned upon for that choice...

Last edited by Mwahfromtheheart; 04-24-2015 at 10:50 PM..
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