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Old 03-18-2013, 07:18 PM
 
31 posts, read 59,726 times
Reputation: 36

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Quote:
Originally Posted by thunderkat59 View Post
Where do you live now?
It just goes to show, one mans paradise is another mans prison.
I lived in Philly for 30+ years and the only identifiable culture I saw was sprawling filth and crime, relative to other cities of its size. Comparing Louisville to Philly is hard to do on any level. If I never see it or hear of it again, I will be better off
Doing a short stint in St. Louis before my company will be transferring me to Denver. I really don't have a single bit of allegiance to anywhere. If I get someplace and I like it I stay, if I don't I keep going. I've been in St. Louis for one week, and in 8 months I'll be gone from here. It's ok, but I wouldn't stay if you paid me millions.

I think the idea that someone could try to associate the culture of a particular city with museums is pretty far fetched, even the Louvre does not make or break the city it resides in. I was refferring to the people themselves actually. As someone not from a coast at all.. my interpretation of philly culture was pretty hard to miss. Same goes for Chicago, same goes for New Orleans and other worthwhile cities. I met a couple of young ladies at a music event in Chicago some years back. Before I even spoke to them I knew they were from Philly by their demeanor and fashion.. that awesome accent was just icing on the cake. Many people from Chicago have their own brand of humor that to me is unmistakable. I am not talking about transplants, I mean people that lived in these places their whole lives. New Orleans.. well thats a whole other thing because there are so many facets of New Orleans culture that trying to just pull out social cues, food, dress, linguistics.. it goes on and on.

Not trying to city bash.. I just don't see a reason to settle for someplace bland that does not have an identifiable culture. It being safe, predictable, and affordable are reasons I will possibly pick to live someplace when I am 80 years old. But hopefully not even then.
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Old 03-18-2013, 09:39 PM
 
6,879 posts, read 14,710,015 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by graphotism View Post
Doing a short stint in St. Louis before my company will be transferring me to Denver. I really don't have a single bit of allegiance to anywhere. If I get someplace and I like it I stay, if I don't I keep going. I've been in St. Louis for one week, and in 8 months I'll be gone from here. It's ok, but I wouldn't stay if you paid me millions.

I think the idea that someone could try to associate the culture of a particular city with museums is pretty far fetched, even the Louvre does not make or break the city it resides in. I was refferring to the people themselves actually. As someone not from a coast at all.. my interpretation of philly culture was pretty hard to miss. Same goes for Chicago, same goes for New Orleans and other worthwhile cities. I met a couple of young ladies at a music event in Chicago some years back. Before I even spoke to them I knew they were from Philly by their demeanor and fashion.. that awesome accent was just icing on the cake. Many people from Chicago have their own brand of humor that to me is unmistakable. I am not talking about transplants, I mean people that lived in these places their whole lives. New Orleans.. well thats a whole other thing because there are so many facets of New Orleans culture that trying to just pull out social cues, food, dress, linguistics.. it goes on and on.

Not trying to city bash.. I just don't see a reason to settle for someplace bland that does not have an identifiable culture. It being safe, predictable, and affordable are reasons I will possibly pick to live someplace when I am 80 years old. But hopefully not even then.

I reviewed your posts. You are in your late 20s and live in Indianapolis. You have a traveled a few places for work. Do you think that place has culture? Sorry if you do not like Louisville culture, but there is TONS. Same with Saint Louis. From Hot Browns and Benedictine spreads, to the Great Gatsby, to Old Louisville, to one of the longest running and largest attended sports festivals in the US (Derby is not just one day my friend). You have all the major performing arts venues, a top 20 foodie and craft cocktail culture, great live music venues, and now a number of urban bourbon distilleries opening. In fact, I predict by 2020 that Louisville will have a downtown full of bourbon distilleries drawing tourists all around the region just as Nashville does for country music.

You have a very independent and "weird" culture, a strong local political community, old timers and new timers mixing with transplants alike. Louisville is actually one of the most cultural and festive cities I have seen...it just may not be your cup of tea, and that is perfectly ok.

But if you really like Chicago, come to Louisville next time with an open eye. In a way, it is a mini Chicago with a southern twang...very neighborhood and tradition oriented, Don't take my word for it. Look at reviews on Yelp and Tripadvisor and you will see that many agree.

In addition to the above culture I like, Louisville also has some distinct cultural elements I am not fond of. Line beards and big cars on 22 inch rims, long strips of unsightly commercial in the suburbs, and a bit of a parochialism in parts (although I have noticed with so many immigrants and transplants now, this is disappearing).
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Old 03-19-2013, 01:28 AM
 
142 posts, read 684,444 times
Reputation: 201
Smile Yes, Kentucky has culture...

Quote:
Originally Posted by graphotism View Post
Doing a short stint in St. Louis before my company will be transferring me to Denver. I really don't have a single bit of allegiance to anywhere. If I get someplace and I like it I stay, if I don't I keep going. I've been in St. Louis for one week, and in 8 months I'll be gone from here. It's ok, but I wouldn't stay if you paid me millions.

I think the idea that someone could try to associate the culture of a particular city with museums is pretty far fetched, even the Louvre does not make or break the city it resides in. I was refferring to the people themselves actually. As someone not from a coast at all.. my interpretation of philly culture was pretty hard to miss. Same goes for Chicago, same goes for New Orleans and other worthwhile cities. I met a couple of young ladies at a music event in Chicago some years back. Before I even spoke to them I knew they were from Philly by their demeanor and fashion.. that awesome accent was just icing on the cake. Many people from Chicago have their own brand of humor that to me is unmistakable. I am not talking about transplants, I mean people that lived in these places their whole lives. New Orleans.. well thats a whole other thing because there are so many facets of New Orleans culture that trying to just pull out social cues, food, dress, linguistics.. it goes on and on.

Not trying to city bash.. I just don't see a reason to settle for someplace bland that does not have an identifiable culture. It being safe, predictable, and affordable are reasons I will possibly pick to live someplace when I am 80 years old. But hopefully not even then.
Greetings,

First a refresher on "culture" - from a social anthropology perspective.

In the 20th century, "culture" emerged as a central concept in anthropology, encompassing the range of human phenomena that cannot be attributed to genetic inheritance. Specifically, the term "culture" in American anthropology had two meanings: (1) the evolved human capacity to classify and represent experiences with symbols, and to act imaginatively and creatively; and (2) the distinct ways that people living in different parts of the world classified and represented their experiences, and acted creatively. Culture described by many scholars as an integrated system of learned behavior patterns which are characteristic of the members of a society and which are not a result of biological inheritance.

Distinctions are currently made between the physical artifacts created by a society, its so-called material culture and everything else, the intangibles such as language, customs, etc. that are the main referent of the term "culture".

Louisville and for that matter Kentucky does have "culture", as per above definition.

Here is a little bit of our culture you must have over looked to help you get started:

Kentucky's culture is generally considered to be Southern, it is unique in that it is also influenced by the Midwest and Southern Appalachia in certain areas of the state. The state is known for bourbon and whiskey distilling, tobacco, horse racing, and college basketball. Kentucky is more similar to the Upper South in terms of ancestry which is predominantly American. During the 19th century, Kentucky did receive a substantial number of German immigrants, who settled mostly in the Midwest, along the Ohio river primarily in Louisville, Covington, and Newport. Only Maryland, Delaware, and West Virginia have higher German ancestry percentages than Kentucky among Census-defined Southern states, Kentucky's percentage is closer to Virginia's than the previously named state's percentages. Kentucky was a slave state, and blacks once comprised over one-quarter of its population. However, it lacked the cotton plantation system and never had the same high percentage of blacks as most other slave states. With less than 8% of its current population being black, Kentucky is rarely included in modern-day definitions of the Black Belt, despite a relatively significant rural black population in the Central and Western areas of the state. Kentucky adopted the Jim Crow system of racial segregation in most public spheres after the Civil War, but the state never disenfranchised black citizens to the level of the Deep South states, and it peacefully integrated its schools after the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education verdict, later adopting the first state civil rights act in the South in 1966.

The biggest day in horse racing, the Kentucky Derby, is preceded by the two-week Kentucky Derby Festival in Louisville. Louisville also plays host to the Kentucky State Fair, the Kentucky Shakespeare Festival, and Southern gospel's annual highlight, the National Quartet Convention. Owensboro, Kentucky's third largest city, gives credence to its nickname of "Barbecue Capital of the World" by hosting the annual International Bar-B-Q Festival. Bowling Green, Kentucky's fourth (and soon to be third) largest city and home to the only assembly plant in the world that manufactures the Chevrolet Corvette, opened the National Corvette Museum in 1994.

Old Louisville, the largest historic preservation district in the United States featuring Victorian architecture and the third largest overall, hosts the St. James Court Art Show, the largest outdoor art show in the United States. The neighborhood was also home to the Southern Exposition (1883–1887), which featured the first public display of Thomas Edison's light bulb, and was the setting of Alice Hegan Rice's novel, Mrs. Wiggs of the Cabbage Patch and Fontaine Fox's comic strip, the "Toonerville Trolley".

The more rural communities are not without traditions of their own. Hodgenville, the birthplace of Abraham Lincoln, hosts the annual Lincoln Days Celebration. Bardstown celebrates its heritage as a major bourbon-producing region with the Kentucky Bourbon Festival. (Legend holds that Baptist minister Elijah Craig invented bourbon with his black slave in Georgetown, but some dispute this claim.) Glasgow mimics Glasgow, Scotland by hosting the Glasgow Highland Games, its own version of the Highland Games, and Sturgis hosts "Little Sturgis", a mini version of Sturgis, South Dakota's annual Sturgis Motorcycle Rally. The residents of tiny Benton even pay tribute to their favorite tuber, the sweet potato, by hosting Tater Day. Residents of Clarkson in Grayson County celebrate their city's ties to the honey industry by celebrating the Clarkson Honeyfest. The Clarkson Honeyfest is held the last Thursday, Friday and Saturday in September, and is the "Official State Honey Festival of Kentucky."

Colonel Harland Sanders, founder of Kentucky Fried Chicken, is one of the most highly recognized figures in the world. Laurel County, Kentucky, located in the heart of the beautiful Daniel Boone National Forest, is proud to be the home of the Colonel's first and original restaurant established in the 1940s. Lee Cummings, co-founder of Lee's Famous Recipe Chicken, also began his career in 1952 with his uncle, Colonel Sanders, in Laurel County. The Annual World Chicken Festival is a tribute to this heritage. The international celebration, the last full weekend of every September, is held in beautiful downtown London. Entertainment for four fun filled days makes this one of Kentucky's largest festivals.

Louisville, KY and Kentucky most certainly has culture - it may just not be the particular "type" of culture
that you were looking for and that is cool...

Thank you for your attention.

Cheers...

Last edited by Informer; 03-19-2013 at 01:51 AM..
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Old 03-19-2013, 09:50 AM
 
Location: downtown phoenix
1,197 posts, read 1,595,372 times
Reputation: 1912
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayton Sux View Post
Being a native Chicagoan I'd like a bit more on this percevied unique Chicago humor.
I myself grew up in joliet, although not in the city prooper, definately considered well within the borders of chicagoland, and I am also curious as to this brand of humor. does it involve mike ditka jokes?
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Old 03-25-2013, 11:42 PM
 
7 posts, read 12,193 times
Reputation: 11
Louisville is a wonderful city. Don't listen to what people say about Kentucky Hillbillies because Louisville is not like the rest of the state. By the way Louisville is in the south so you will probably get called a yankee.
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Old 03-27-2013, 12:10 AM
 
23 posts, read 25,414 times
Reputation: 47
All i'll say about Louisville,is I moved here in 1969 on my way to Cleveland Ohio. I'm glad I never made it to Cleveland, till 1994, to visit and attend a funearl. I love L/ville,Ky.it's a great city!
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Old 03-27-2013, 03:09 AM
 
6,879 posts, read 14,710,015 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FrimGrip View Post
All i'll say about Louisville,is I moved here in 1969 on my way to Cleveland Ohio. I'm glad I never made it to Cleveland, till 1994, to visit and attend a funearl. I love L/ville,Ky.it's a great city!
I agree. Cleveland....meh I have seen better! Glad you chose to stay in Louisville. What part of town are you in?
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Old 03-28-2013, 01:04 PM
 
83 posts, read 126,037 times
Reputation: 50
Hi Nat,

I moved to Louisville from out of state 5+ years ago. Here are my thoughts on your questions. Feel free to DM me if you have specific questions or need me to clarify.


Where you are working: I've worked at three companies since moving here - one was a small business (less than 100 employees) and the other two were considerably larger. The job market here (generally) is okay - it really depends on the industry you're talking about.

-How much you are willing to spend on housing: Louisville has very afforable housing IMO, especially compared to other cities of its size. I currently pay around $700/month for a 1-bedroom apt in a really nice, safe part of town ( very residential, quiet, not a lot of younger people). I'm actually moving a slightly larger Southern city in a few months and I can't find anything liveable/decent in that price range (at least not in the area of town that I've been looking in).

-How long of a commute you're willing to tolerate: I work downtown, and it takes me about 20 minutes (on a good day) and 45 -60 minutes on bad days.

-If you have kids: Private school or public school? Let me preface this by saying I don't have any children (yet), but have worked with the public school system here before in my previous job. There is NO WAY I would send my children to Jefferson County (Louisville). Most people I work with (even people with more modest incomes) shell out money to send their children to private schools. I have relatives who will be moving here this summer from out-of-state and they refuse to send their children to Jefferson County based on recommendations from friends and co-workers. JC is just a mess, period.


The people: I have made several friends during my time in Louisville; in fact, they are the main reason I've stayed in the city as long as I have. The people here are pretty friendly in general. However, I will warn you about this - if you're not from Louisville originally, it can seem very cliqueish and insular. A lot of people that I know who have lived here most of their lives have had the same friends since grade school, end up marrying someone they went to high school with. In fact, when people ask you where you went to school, don't assume they are talking about college - more than likely, they are talking about your high school. You are somewhat judged on where you went to high school.

If you are single (which I believe you said you aren't), it is a HORRIBLE city for dating. I'm not entirely sure why (maybe it's because of what I said in the previous paragraph?). Again, this has just been my experience. It seems like there aren't a lot of eligble men in their late 20s/early 30s here, because most of them got married by age 25.

Louisville is a GREAT place for raising a family though - I would highly recommend the city for that purpose. There's is a lot of stuff to do here for families and the cost of living is pretty affordable. But if you're single past a certain age in this city, it seems that SOME people look down upon you. Again - just my opinion/past experience, so take it for what it's worth.
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Old 04-06-2013, 04:47 PM
 
Location: Louisville, KY
37 posts, read 75,942 times
Reputation: 26
Not too shabby.
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