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Old 06-24-2015, 05:36 PM
 
798 posts, read 1,943,327 times
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Slightly off topic, but here is some info on the architecture and history of some of these neighborhoods being discussed: :: New Albany Historic Preservation Comission :: News ::

A little more on topic regarding revival of the downtown area: There is a yoga studio opening soon right on Market I think it was. Habana Blues has moved over to Pearl Street, and the old building they were in is being developed as a steak restaurant by the guy that owns/operates Feast and the New Albany Exchange so it should be good. Also the Seeds and Greens place that was mentioned has some good looking stuff, as well as a lot of 'crunchy' types of products I haven't really heard of. I hope to get in there again soon and see what kind of sandwiches and things they make at their deli at some point.
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Old 07-12-2015, 05:02 PM
 
Location: Louisville Area
68 posts, read 71,318 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lhayes1976 View Post
My husband and I live in Louisville and plan to retire and downsize in a year or two. We love the Highlands in Louisville, but just refuse to pay the price to live there. I know there are some streets in new Albany that have the same style home we want (bungalow/shotgun). what streets should we be looking at? I've read there is revival in some of the downtown New Albany areas.
I live in New Albany, and I'm from Louisville. Our rationale was the same: we weren't about to pay out the nose to live in the Highlands or Crescent Hill.

We love New Albany. As another said, close to the downtown area will give you walking distance to a lot of great restaurants and shops. But, there are a lot of other older areas with exactly what you're looking for. New Albany isn't that big, and downtown is easily accessible within 5 minutes from nearly every older neighborhood. There are very nice, quiet streets east of Vincennes St, and particularly east of Silver St. Most of those are Bungalows, and even a few craftsman homes. Apples-to-apples homes are running less than half of what you'd find in the Highlands.

If you need more specific info, don't hesitate.
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Old 07-12-2015, 05:10 PM
 
Location: Louisville Area
68 posts, read 71,318 times
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Originally Posted by censusdata View Post
I just moved to NA last weekend and have been moving stuff in for a couple weeks. No regrets so far. Our nice 1950s ranch house was insanely cheap (a lot less than $65k) despite having great hard wood floors, a rebuilt kitchen, and only a handful of minor annoyances. We're in the McDonald Ln / Charlestown Rd area which is out of the Victorian district. I'd love to live in Mansion Row area, maybe a possibility if this house turns a profit.

Downtown and nearby areas are good but there's still enough room for improvement to view it as an investment buy. I could see the whole area having a large increase in values once the bridges project makes the commute easier. If you want a good urban experience you can't go wrong between Elm and Main streets.
Right now is definitely the time to buy in New Albany. It's not going to stay this cheap very much longer. The rennaissance is accelerating after about 8 years of steady growth. We strongly feel our house will sell for far more than we bought it in a couple years.
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Old 09-11-2015, 03:15 PM
 
Location: Downtown Indianapolis
261 posts, read 417,784 times
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New Albany has improved a lot recently. As many have noted, the downtown area has experienced an immense revitalization in recent years with some nice restaurants, bars, and shops. Main St. in New Albany is as interesting as any street in this part of the country with its unique collection of gorgeous 19th Century Mansions. There are also a ton of really nice new subdivisions in the outer areas of New Albany and into Clark County.

My biggest complaint about the area is driving. Louisville has always been a miserable city to drive in because of its antiquated infrastructure. The bridge projects should improve that, but it's a nightmare at the moment with all of the construction. I've also always thought that the regular city streets in Louisville were a pain in the neck too.

Southern Indiana is a horribly tedious place to drive in. I've never seen a collection of so many slow and oblivious drivers. There's a wide stretch of Charlestown Rd. in New Albany where the speed limit is 50, but you're lucky to hit 40 on it because it's almost certain that you'll get behind some slow driver who is taking their sweet time and completely oblivious to everything else. This makes driving around New Albany and the surrounding areas pretty unpleasant. You constantly get behind drivers going severely below the speed limit.

Overall though, Louisville/Southern Indiana is a very enjoyable and pleasant area to live in. Nice natural scenery too with the Ohio River waterfront, Highlands area in Louisville, and Floyds Knobs backdrop.
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Old 09-12-2015, 02:47 PM
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
9,599 posts, read 20,512,817 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by indy18 View Post
New Albany has improved a lot recently. As many have noted, the downtown area has experienced an immense revitalization in recent years with some nice restaurants, bars, and shops. Main St. in New Albany is as interesting as any street in this part of the country with its unique collection of gorgeous 19th Century Mansions. There are also a ton of really nice new subdivisions in the outer areas of New Albany and into Clark County.

My biggest complaint about the area is driving. Louisville has always been a miserable city to drive in because of its antiquated infrastructure. The bridge projects should improve that, but it's a nightmare at the moment with all of the construction. I've also always thought that the regular city streets in Louisville were a pain in the neck too.

Southern Indiana is a horribly tedious place to drive in. I've never seen a collection of so many slow and oblivious drivers. There's a wide stretch of Charlestown Rd. in New Albany where the speed limit is 50, but you're lucky to hit 40 on it because it's almost certain that you'll get behind some slow driver who is taking their sweet time and completely oblivious to everything else. This makes driving around New Albany and the surrounding areas pretty unpleasant. You constantly get behind drivers going severely below the speed limit.

Overall though, Louisville/Southern Indiana is a very enjoyable and pleasant area to live in. Nice natural scenery too with the Ohio River waterfront, Highlands area in Louisville, and Floyds Knobs backdrop.
I've noticed the drivers in New Albany seem to have more of a country mentality compared with Louisville. In the eastern suburbs of Louisville 4 way stops are treated like yield signs. In Indiana 4 way stops are treated like red lights that hold for 30 seconds. The overall mentality in a lot of Southern Indiana is country I guess because most of the inhabitants moved there from rural Indiana and rural Kentucky. Downtown NA and immediately to the east is start to get people moving in from urban areas of Louisville and is starting to feel more urban in culture. It's a neat mix to have vastly different areas so close together
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Old 09-13-2015, 12:14 PM
 
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While people do drive slower, I've seen as many if not more people in New Albany running red lights as I do in Louisville. One truck last week gunned it when the light turned yellow and was so far back he STILL didn't make it into the intersection until WELL after the light had turned red
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Old 09-13-2015, 07:44 PM
 
Location: IN
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I have lived in many different cities and states, and I'll have to say that driving in southern Indiana is "interesting" and not in a good kind of way. As someone who does not enjoying driving that much, the area has its challenges with infrastructure that is just not quite adequate for the population that it serves. A case in point is Jeffersonville. The entire population within the city limits is around 40K, but the roads and infrastructure is better served for a population about half that size, especially apparent during any weekday afternoon. The state of Indiana generally forgets about the southern portion of the state for the most part.
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Old 09-14-2015, 01:09 AM
 
6,306 posts, read 13,214,788 times
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Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
I have lived in many different cities and states, and I'll have to say that driving in southern Indiana is "interesting" and not in a good kind of way. As someone who does not enjoying driving that much, the area has its challenges with infrastructure that is just not quite adequate for the population that it serves. A case in point is Jeffersonville. The entire population within the city limits is around 40K, but the roads and infrastructure is better served for a population about half that size, especially apparent during any weekday afternoon. The state of Indiana generally forgets about the southern portion of the state for the most part.
THIS....S. Indiana is really one of the top 5 largest metro areas in Indiana, but in reality it is a suburb of Louisville. With a population well over 300,000 in Louisville's "north" burbs, S. Indiana needs better infrastructure and the completion of the 265 beltway should help. That said, almost all the roads need widened, especially 64 going in to the Knobs. Ironically, by not serving 25% of Louisville's suburbs which is what Indiana comprises, the folks up in Indy purposely hold back the growth in S. Indiana bc they see it as competition. I have a friend in government in Indy and he flat out told me that all of S. Indiana is the last thing on Indy politicians minds. You can throw in Evansville but Indy does not worry about that area since it is so much smaller than metro Louisville.
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Old 09-14-2015, 07:24 AM
 
Location: Downtown Indianapolis
261 posts, read 417,784 times
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Another idiotic thing about Louisville infrastructure: Why in the hell are 71 and 64 each just two lanes both ways east of downtown and all of the way to the Watterson? 64 widens to three lanes when you get east of the Watterson, but that doesn't do you much good when you're stopped in traffic at the Grinstead exit. Both 71 and 64 should be three lanes both ways from east of downtown all the way out to the Snyder. You have two sections of major interstate highways in a large city with both local and cross-country traffic, yet they are two lanes as if they are some rural interstate in the middle of nowhere. The fact that both of these roads lack three lanes makes travel in and out of downtown a never ending nightmare.

Louisville/Southern Indiana is such a pleasant area with so much going for it, but the miserable interstate infrastructure has always held it back from reaching its potential. The new bridges will obviously improve that dramatically, but an East End bridge is something that should have happened about 30 years ago. It saddens me to think where the metro area could be if this had been done 30 years ago. I still don't think they would have ever started construction on the new bridges if it weren't for the Sherman Minton bridge closure making travel in the area a complete laughingstock.
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Old 09-14-2015, 08:43 AM
 
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Perhaps a more helpful solution would be to continue to invest in the downtowns in New Albany and Jeffersonville and improve the poor public transportation in the areas? Would be a heck of a lot cheaper than funding massive highway expansions.
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