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Old 09-22-2015, 06:10 PM
 
Location: IN
20,240 posts, read 34,628,022 times
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I find the drivers in the Louisville region to be fairly aggressive overall. The seasonal changes in daylight are much more muted compared to Wisconsin or areas further north. The biggest adjustment I've had to make since moving further south again is avoiding the sun when possible during certain times of the day, far stronger and more intense than what I had been used to. Winter should not be an issue for me as I live 7-10 minutes from work. When I lived in the Snowbelt I drove 35 minutes one way to work on rural roads.
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Old 09-23-2015, 11:49 PM
 
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Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
I find the drivers in the Louisville region to be fairly aggressive overall. The seasonal changes in daylight are much more muted compared to Wisconsin or areas further north. The biggest adjustment I've had to make since moving further south again is avoiding the sun when possible during certain times of the day, far stronger and more intense than what I had been used to. Winter should not be an issue for me as I live 7-10 minutes from work. When I lived in the Snowbelt I drove 35 minutes one way to work on rural roads.
yuck, I noticed that too. That sun driving on 64 in the rearview..it really kills you. That road is perfectly aligned with the sunrise/set. The drivers are very docile and polite here....nothing like Chicago, NY, FL, or even Cincinnati or Indy IMO.
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Old 09-24-2015, 11:02 AM
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
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I thought the drivers here where aggressive. Then I visited Chicagoland last week. Average speed on the freeways when free flowing averages 80-90 mpg and they don't ever slow up to let you switch lanes or merge. Saw someone repeatedly blow the horn and roll down the window to yell at a worker watering flowers next to the road in an office park. Makes Louisville drivers look like Mayberry.
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Old 09-24-2015, 11:15 AM
 
Location: IL/IN/FL/CA/KY/FL
1,131 posts, read 809,785 times
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Originally Posted by censusdata View Post
I thought the drivers here where aggressive. Then I visited Chicagoland last week. Average speed on the freeways when free flowing averages 80-90 mpg and they don't ever slow up to let you switch lanes or merge. Saw someone repeatedly blow the horn and roll down the window to yell at a worker watering flowers next to the road in an office park. Makes Louisville drivers look like Mayberry.
Yeah it helps to have perspective. Driving on the eastern seaboard is different too. I actually prefer to drive in Chicago, because despite as hectic as it looks, it's actually quite predictable. And to me, predictable means safe, at least for my driving skills. When I moved out to the west coast, within the first few weeks I had almost gotten into 2 fender benders, and I've never been in an accident in my 24 years of driving (I'm 39). West coast drivers (especially around SF) took some getting used to, because they're much more erratic. They're not rude or aggressive often, but they're just BAD. Hanging out in blind spots, going too slow for traffic in spots, stopping instead of yielding, etc.

Louisville drivers aren't great either, but I think the "aggressiveness" comes from the poorer segments, and so there are certain times of the day where you're going to be more likely to encounter aggressive drivers and other times when you'll experience more politeness. When I lived in Louisville, I thought the Indiana drivers were the worst, and while they're probably still the worst among the neighboring areas, drivers in Boston and surrounding areas are easily the worst in the US from my experience. Driving in Florida can be challenging too depending on the area - tourists, foreign tourists, old people and immigrants everywhere and not one of them drives the same.
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Old 09-24-2015, 08:13 PM
 
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They're bad.......gray and ugly and nothing good about them. They're icky.
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Old 09-25-2015, 07:18 AM
 
Location: Downtown Indianapolis
261 posts, read 418,160 times
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Originally Posted by ServoMiff View Post

Louisville drivers aren't great either, but I think the "aggressiveness" comes from the poorer segments, and so there are certain times of the day where you're going to be more likely to encounter aggressive drivers and other times when you'll experience more politeness. When I lived in Louisville, I thought the Indiana drivers were the worst, and while they're probably still the worst among the neighboring areas, drivers in Boston and surrounding areas are easily the worst in the US from my experience. Driving in Florida can be challenging too depending on the area - tourists, foreign tourists, old people and immigrants everywhere and not one of them drives the same.

I don't think the drivers in Louisville are that bad, it's just that the city is a nightmare to drive in because of its pitifully inadequate interstate infrastructure.

Drivers in Southern Indiana are awful. Even though New Albany/Jeffersonville/Clarksville are all part of a large urban area, there is a true slow country mentality when it comes to the drivers. Go drive along the stretch of Charlestown Rd. in New Albany where it's 50 MPH. You'll be lucky to hit 40 MPH. People drive between 35-40 MPH on that road, completely oblivious to the fact that they are going severely below the speed limit. It's like this all over Southern Indiana. I've also noticed that far too many drivers around Southern Indiana treat turn signals as if they are some rare disease that should be avoided at all costs. It's not uncommon at all for the car in front of you to immediately slam on its breaks and make a turn without a signal.

One other thing about driving in Southern Indiana: I'VE NEVER SEEN SO MANY CARS AT NIGHT WITH HEADLIGHTS OUT. It's pretty much impossible to drive around New Albany or surrounding areas at night without passing multiple vehicles that only have one working headlight. This is just pure unforgivable laziness. If one of my headlights goes out, I'm getting that fixed immediately. If you're a police officer around here, you could spend your entire evening pulling over cars who only have one working headlight.
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Old 09-25-2015, 10:25 AM
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
9,602 posts, read 20,535,491 times
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Originally Posted by indy18 View Post
I don't think the drivers in Louisville are that bad, it's just that the city is a nightmare to drive in because of its pitifully inadequate interstate infrastructure.

Drivers in Southern Indiana are awful. Even though New Albany/Jeffersonville/Clarksville are all part of a large urban area, there is a true slow country mentality when it comes to the drivers. Go drive along the stretch of Charlestown Rd. in New Albany where it's 50 MPH. You'll be lucky to hit 40 MPH. People drive between 35-40 MPH on that road, completely oblivious to the fact that they are going severely below the speed limit. It's like this all over Southern Indiana. I've also noticed that far too many drivers around Southern Indiana treat turn signals as if they are some rare disease that should be avoided at all costs. It's not uncommon at all for the car in front of you to immediately slam on its breaks and make a turn without a signal.

One other thing about driving in Southern Indiana: I'VE NEVER SEEN SO MANY CARS AT NIGHT WITH HEADLIGHTS OUT. It's pretty much impossible to drive around New Albany or surrounding areas at night without passing multiple vehicles that only have one working headlight. This is just pure unforgivable laziness. If one of my headlights goes out, I'm getting that fixed immediately. If you're a police officer around here, you could spend your entire evening pulling over cars who only have one working headlight.
Want a cheap vacation of Eastern Kentucky? Go to the Wal Mart in New Albany.

Lots of old pickup trucks in the lower income areas and seems like 70% of people are smoking while driving. Sometimes I feel like I've stepped in a time machine back to rural KY in the 1980s when I drive 8th St Rd lol
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Old 09-25-2015, 11:15 AM
 
Location: IN
20,240 posts, read 34,628,022 times
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Originally Posted by censusdata View Post
Want a cheap vacation of Eastern Kentucky? Go to the Wal Mart in New Albany.

Lots of old pickup trucks in the lower income areas and seems like 70% of people are smoking while driving. Sometimes I feel like I've stepped in a time machine back to rural KY in the 1980s when I drive 8th St Rd lol
Jeffersonville is similar in some portions. One time I was stopped at a stoplight and about 8-9 cars were turning left going the other way and every single driver was smoking, most in trucks. Apparently it is still the 70s or 80s here in that regard when 40% of the population smoked.
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Old 09-25-2015, 11:40 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
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Really unless you're in FL, CA, or some other semi-tropical location, winters basically suck everywhere. It's just the degree.
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Old 09-26-2015, 08:12 PM
 
2,391 posts, read 3,885,288 times
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Originally Posted by tas80 View Post
Hey guys. I currently live in South FL and am considering a move to Louisville. I would like an honest answer on just how harsh the winters are there. I've heard the last couple of winters were very cold and snowy. Is this normal ? Also, are they good and treating the roads and making them driveable ? Thanks.

For the last couple of years, our past winters were horrible. We got what they did up east like Boston. It doesn't happen often, but the whole USA and Canada got hit hard these past couple of years. The Farmers Almanac says we're expecting another bad one this winter but not as bad as last winter.

No one knows how to drive here. They don't use signals to change lanes, some do tho (I do). They drive better in Florida than they do here, I think.
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