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Old 09-16-2015, 08:59 AM
 
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Hey guys. I currently live in South FL and am considering a move to Louisville. I would like an honest answer on just how harsh the winters are there. I've heard the last couple of winters were very cold and snowy. Is this normal ? Also, are they good and treating the roads and making them driveable ? Thanks.
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Old 09-16-2015, 09:53 AM
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
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Our average temps in Dec/ jan are 41 / 26. A lot of days are slightly above or below that. We have weather that can be as brutal as what Fargo usually gets but it doesn't last long and some entire winters don't have extreme cold. A typical winter will have a handful of days where the morning wind chill is around zero. The next week could have highs in the 1950s. The past 2 winters are the coldest and snowest that I can remember in my 32 years. 1994 was also bad. It may be another couple decades before we see temps that cold again. Air temps in some rural areas hit -32 F. But that's a once in 15 year+ event.

But back to typical winters. During a winter storm we may get a couple to 8 inches of snow at a time. For a few hours you stay at home, after that major roads are drivable. When the sun hits them it melts most ice off. Unless you have a rear wheel drive vehicle you can drive out to the main roads even without snow removal for your local street.
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Old 09-16-2015, 10:16 AM
 
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Thanks censusdata. Winters in Louisville sound absolutely brutal, especially for someone who has never seen snow or experienced anything below 35 degrees.
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Old 09-16-2015, 01:46 PM
 
Location: Downtown Indianapolis
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If you live in South Florida, then the winters are going to be a major shock. No way around that. It's not Minneapolis or Chicago cold, but it can still get pretty freaking cold. Most winter days seem to be ugly cloudy days in the upper 30's/lower 40's. Sometimes Louisville goes a whole winter without a big snow event, other times (like the last two winters) you have multiple large events. It just kind of depends. Completely unpredictable.

Louisville winters are much less harsh than Indianapolis winters, which is just 100 miles away. The climate changes about 50 miles up the road in Indiana. Indy gets far more snow and a lot more bitterly cold days. For example, the average January high in Louisville is 43 degrees, whereas in Indy it's just 35.6. Indy has 23.5 snowy days a year compared to just 11.8 for Louisville. Big difference.

(got those numbers from Wikipedia).
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Old 09-16-2015, 05:02 PM
 
Location: E ND & NW MN
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I grew up in western Kentucky and followed by dream to be a meteorologist....I now live in the ND/MN area. I prefer cold...so my bias was always that Kentucky winters were way too warm for my taste. But I am familiar with Louisville weather -- that part of the state does get more wintry weather than the western and southern parts of the state. Even my relatives in Oldham county to the east can get a bit colder and snowier than in Jefferson county. That said....as others have pointed out winter's can be quite variable year to year. Some years your first snow may not fall til after Christmas....sometimes by Dec 1. Usually the threat for snow really decreases markedly after March 1st. But in that Dec 15-Mar 1 period you can see cold outbreaks that last a few days where highs are below freezing.... temps below zero are rare but not unheard of....but dont occur every winter. Schools do cancel a lot for snow and slick roads, as snow that falls is often the wet slushy kind that makes roads quite slick....and plus you have melt during day and then re-freeze at night. Combine that with the fact you dont often get a lot of snow....schools play it safe and cancel or delay quite a bit. Certainly much more than where I live now where school cancelling for snow is very very rare.

I remember more often than not....Christmas Day being rainy and in the 40s to low 50s.... having a first snow by New Year's and the period from Jan 15 to Feb 15th being winter then spring setting in by early March with flowers and trees in full bloom by Easter.

So yes you can get winter....but by the time many are tired of it, it warms up.

Louisville weather is nothing like Fargo...I live about 70 miles north. Growing up I got so tired of seeing snow storms ride up from St Louis to Indy or Chicago and we get snow to rain.... so very glad I got out and live in a climate where winter truly comes and lasts for a few months.
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Old 09-17-2015, 09:48 AM
 
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As someone who absolutely hates the cold, I've learned to live with it... now that I've moved East and have learned to dress appropriately for it. Growing up in Louisville, people (including me for some time) never seem to dress accordingly for cold weather. If you buy a nice, insulated coat and don't have a problem wearing a scarf and stocking cap (or toboggan as it's called in the Ville) you'll adjust easier than you think.

The good news is that summers will be more temperate, although it's still going to be extremely humid.
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Old 09-17-2015, 10:21 AM
 
Location: Manitowoc, Wi
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Mr. Kamsack, I thank you very much for your description of the weather. Particularly the parts about March being a time when trees and flowers are blooming and "by the time you are tired of it, it warms up." I live in Manitowoc Wisconsin where it's so cold for so long people, (like me), suffer from winter depression. It's home, but I long to move away someday. I've researched many places, Louisville being one of them. My message to tas80 is this...choosing your favorite climate is a balancing act. Too far south and it's too humid for too long, too far north and it's too cold for too long. I encourage you to visit City-Data.com where you can find everything you want to know. consider your tolerances and decide from there. I wish you the best.
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Old 09-18-2015, 05:43 PM
 
Location: Denver
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Louisville looks like it has great weather/climate to me. It gets enough rain to be green but it's not raining all day everyday. It does have the 4 seasons and temperate climate, but winter is shorter than summer. It does snow, but not that much. The thing that irks me about CO weather is our winters hang so long, leaves are starting to color now in CO Springs and they don't come fully on till almost June. Louisville looks like winter is from Dec to March with November being bleh.

As long as one doens't mind the humidity, I find the temperature distribution quite nice.

Driving in snow isn't bad, as long as it's not more inches high than you have ground clearance on your car or there aren't any really steep hills. I've driven a rear wheel RX-7 with snow tires on solid ice, freezing slush... just imagine your driving on a frozen lake, you can stop if you prepare.

Last edited by Phil P; 09-18-2015 at 06:03 PM..
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Old 09-18-2015, 07:16 PM
 
Location: E ND & NW MN
4,731 posts, read 9,085,251 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jonathanp35comcast View Post
Mr. Kamsack, I thank you very much for your description of the weather. Particularly the parts about March being a time when trees and flowers are blooming and "by the time you are tired of it, it warms up." I live in Manitowoc Wisconsin where it's so cold for so long people, (like me), suffer from winter depression. It's home, but I long to move away someday. I've researched many places, Louisville being one of them. My message to tas80 is this...choosing your favorite climate is a balancing act. Too far south and it's too humid for too long, too far north and it's too cold for too long. I encourage you to visit City-Data.com where you can find everything you want to know. consider your tolerances and decide from there. I wish you the best.
thanks... one thing in describing weather is everyone has such different thoughts/ideas on what is cold and what isn't. But having lived in a very cold climate for quite a while now....and growing up for 18 yrs in Kentucky.... I do feel Louisville area does offer enough of a winter with some snow/ice to satisfy those that want some snow...but not enough snow that sticks around for a long time. As you know, winters vary...some worse than others....but in general that is what I make of it.

Heading south to Bowling Green and then to Nashville, the feeling of having an actual winter each year does in my opinion drop quite a bit. Nashville can have some snow and ice.....but much of their winter is spent with rain vs snow/ice. Bowling Green a bit more winter than Nashville but not by much.
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Old 09-18-2015, 07:21 PM
 
Location: E ND & NW MN
4,731 posts, read 9,085,251 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevin1813 View Post
As someone who absolutely hates the cold, I've learned to live with it... now that I've moved East and have learned to dress appropriately for it. Growing up in Louisville, people (including me for some time) never seem to dress accordingly for cold weather. If you buy a nice, insulated coat and don't have a problem wearing a scarf and stocking cap (or toboggan as it's called in the Ville) you'll adjust easier than you think.

The good news is that summers will be more temperate, although it's still going to be extremely humid.
Funny you mention toboggan....yes we called it that in western Kentucky too. I went to college at Iowa State and I mentioned wearing a toboggan and the looks I got were priceless. Now where I live now...we just call it a hat.... I have heard stocking cap from older folks....but we tell our kids to grab your hat in the cold. Now I live in an area where wearing hats in the winter is nearly everyday for the young...and in fact it is quite a fashion statement for the young hockey players...you always know whom they are as they where their hats all day in school inside and out in the hockey season. My wife is from Minot and some there say "toque" for hat....which is a strongly Canadian term. We also have the term hockey hair in the winter.....
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