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View Poll Results: Louisville: Southern or Midwestern?
Midwest 12 44.44%
South 15 55.56%
Voters: 27. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 10-31-2015, 10:54 AM
 
Location: Arch City
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Pick an option. I've always viewed Louisville as a Southern city with MIDWEST influences.
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Old 10-31-2015, 10:24 PM
 
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People from deeper in the South might not think so, but as a Californian that moved here, it's definitely southern. Then when snow hits and the whole city loses its mind and shuts down and people forget how to drive, definitely southern. I'm from Los Angeles. Never driven in snow until last winter. And I was confused as to how these people survived as long as they did.
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Old 10-31-2015, 10:28 PM
 
Location: IN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jessemh431 View Post
People from deeper in the South might not think so, but as a Californian that moved here, it's definitely southern. Then when snow hits and the whole city loses its mind and shuts down and people forget how to drive, definitely southern. I'm from Los Angeles. Never driven in snow until last winter. And I was confused as to how these people survived as long as they did.
The Kansas City area is the same way regarding snow (two inches often closes schools and other functions), but they like to claim that they are definitely the Midwest. In the vast majority of the Midwest two inches of snow DOES NOT close down things! In the Louisville metro one expects only lighter amounts of snow each winter on average. The Indiana side of the river seems to have a few more plows, but they are covering fewer roads overall minus the interstates.
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Old 10-31-2015, 10:37 PM
 
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Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
The Kansas City area is the same way regarding snow (two inches often closes schools and other functions), but they like to claim that they are definitely the Midwest. In the vast majority of the Midwest two inches of snow DOES NOT close down things! In the Louisville metro one expects only lighter amounts of snow each winter on average. The Indiana side of the river seems to have a few more plows, but they are covering fewer roads overall minus the interstates.
Last year I remember UofL, Bellarmine, a few other local universities, and several other state colleges were closed, as well as many county schools including JCPS. Meanwhile, IUS was in session just across the river. I was living off Southern Parkway at the time. My road actually was never plowed. Everywhere around me was, but my street was stuck until enough 4x4 cars had created a path through the snow. Indiana seemed to be functioning fine. And that was 6 inches I believe. 6 inches of snow caused a state of emergency in KY and that included Louisville.

Surprisingly, the city did much better during the second storm which dumped almost 2 feet in some areas. UofL was still cancelled while IUS was in session I believe. Indiana got less snow during that one, but still.
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Old 11-01-2015, 07:55 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by U146 View Post
Pick an option. I've always viewed Louisville as a Southern city with MIDWEST influences.
This has been debated AD Nauseum. It is not squarely either but a pretty even hybrid. The local accent is a river valley "twang," not a true southern accent. Louisville, for over 200 years, has played itself as to whatever was popular at the time. Until WWII, the north was popular. Now that the south is the "cool place to be," Louisville is playing it up. But Louisville has always had southern ties, specifically to river trade in New Orleans as they were the two largest cities in the SE until after WWI.
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Old 11-01-2015, 08:45 PM
 
Location: Caverns measureless to man...
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If you're driving north, it's the last city of the South; if you're driving south, it's the last city of the North.
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Old 11-01-2015, 09:12 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Albert_The_Crocodile View Post
If you're driving north, it's the last city of the South; if you're driving south, it's the last city of the North.
Slightly off topic, but would Cincinnati count as this also? I feel like they're almost the mirror image of each other in many ways. Louisville is on the border of a Northern state and is much more "northern" than the rest of its state. Cincinnati is on the border of a Southern state and is more "southern" than the rest of its state. And they're on the same river with Louisville just more down stream.
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Old 11-02-2015, 09:37 AM
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jessemh431 View Post
Slightly off topic, but would Cincinnati count as this also? I feel like they're almost the mirror image of each other in many ways. Louisville is on the border of a Northern state and is much more "northern" than the rest of its state. Cincinnati is on the border of a Southern state and is more "southern" than the rest of its state. And they're on the same river with Louisville just more down stream.
You'd think so, but the cultures of each metro area are quite different. Southern Indiana is much more Southern in accent and lifestyle than Northern KY is.
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Old 11-02-2015, 03:54 PM
 
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Originally Posted by censusdata View Post
You'd think so, but the cultures of each metro area are quite different. Southern Indiana is much more Southern in accent and lifestyle than Northern KY is.
Not so sure the folks of NKY would agree with that and I also disagree.
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Old 11-02-2015, 06:29 PM
 
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I actually have to agree with that. Southern Indiana is much more stereotypically "southern" than anything on the Kentucky side of Kentuckiana. I have a lot of friends from NKY who would be...let's say...very out of place in Southern Indiana
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