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Old 01-16-2016, 07:21 PM
 
5,639 posts, read 13,332,252 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cubedeathk View Post
it's not gentrification but tearing down Sheppard Square and Clarksdale and replacing them with the mix of market rate and subsidized housing certainly pushed a lot of people out and probably let Phoenix Hill and Nulu develop as they have and Shelby Park and probably one day Smoketown start to gentrify.
While gentrification can often go too far like in SF and Manhattan, I think the gentrification of those areas is needed and will only benefit the city.
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Old 01-17-2016, 08:42 AM
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
9,594 posts, read 20,503,502 times
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Tearing down those huge public housing complexes was just more money spent to undo what the Greatest Generation messed up with urban planning. Putting your poorest citizens in a couple crowded buildings where no one owns their unit or yard was a disaster waiting to happen. We should've dispersed them with housing vouchers all along. I understand most residents resent being moved but it will mean fewer murders in the long run. I know Lexington used to have a very rough neighborhood centered on Georgetown St because of a large complex. Since it was torn down it's now a low income area with few murders.


SF, Manhattan, etc are different in that the poorest are priced out of anywhere to live and often relocate to the Deep South. Louisville will never become so expensive people can't live anywhere nearby. I think that's a good thing. Our society was more functional pre WW2 because rich and poor lived side by side rather than the extreme income segregation going on today.
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Old 01-17-2016, 09:35 AM
 
95 posts, read 76,795 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by censusdata View Post
Tearing down those huge public housing complexes was just more money spent to undo what the Greatest Generation messed up with urban planning. Putting your poorest citizens in a couple crowded buildings where no one owns their unit or yard was a disaster waiting to happen. We should've dispersed them with housing vouchers all along. I understand most residents resent being moved but it will mean fewer murders in the long run. I know Lexington used to have a very rough neighborhood centered on Georgetown St because of a large complex. Since it was torn down it's now a low income area with few murders.


SF, Manhattan, etc are different in that the poorest are priced out of anywhere to live and often relocate to the Deep South. Louisville will never become so expensive people can't live anywhere nearby. I think that's a good thing. Our society was more functional pre WW2 because rich and poor lived side by side rather than the extreme income segregation going on today.
To me it is interesting that right next to public housing in Phoenix Hill you have all these new somewhat pricy developments like the Edge and 310 Nulu, in places just across the street. The pace of gentrification in Louisville is just so slow as to not get people up in arms like it has in big cities on the coast. Germantown has so slowly changed and seems to just be a replacing of older people with younger people, not people being forced out, which is good.
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Old 02-24-2016, 11:35 PM
 
Location: Denver
13,979 posts, read 18,755,827 times
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I'd like to know how the city compares to New Orleans.

The crime in New Orleans takes a back seat for me, because the culture and vibe of the city makes it worth it. There are many civil issues with the city but yuppies still flock. Would it be a correct assumption that Louisville has far less civil issues like roads, blatant corruption, and terrible city services, but doesn't stack up in culture, vibe, and urbanity?

New Orleans also has the benefit of feeling like a much larger city than the population states. When I'm there it feels like it could be more like a 3 or 4 million MSA. Does Louisville have the same effect?

Bardstown vs Magazine St?
Nulu vs The Marigny?
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Old 02-24-2016, 11:48 PM
 
6,305 posts, read 13,208,643 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kcskylinelover View Post
I enjoy your posts.
You're quite the "homer" but there's nothing wrong with loving your own city.

That being said:
1) Which specifically of top 20 metros do you think L'ville "FEELS" like or is comparable to?

2) Extending it further, which of the 25 metros do you feel L'ville compares to in amenites?
I am not a homer. Not from Louisville. But I feel I discovered a gem. St Louis, Tampa, Baltimore, Charlotte....it offers a lot of the same amenities in a much smaller area/half the metro population. This is the "New Orleans" effect. Not that Louisville is a dense or walkable as New Orleans, but it historically was neck and neck, and it is getting that way more and more. Yes, I think Louisville, per capita, punches way above its weight. The reality in real life, and the difference between real life and city-data, is people spend the majority of their life in a city in a few neighborhoods. And I will put Louisvilles urban areas like Highlands, Crescent Hill, Clifton, Nulu, Butchertown, Old Louisville, Germantown, etc...they are right up there with many cohorts in metros like those I listed above. New Orleans does the same thing. Anyone who cannot see that objectively has not been all around Louisville's urban neighborhoods, or even parts of S. Indiana. I would throw KC in there. While all these cities may have pro sports, a maybe a few bigger museums, or one or two higher end department stores, to 90% of a city's residents, these cities live, day to day, very similar. I can say this with absolute conviction having lived and traveled all over.

I think Louisville stacks up in culture...great parks, top rated food, great indie art gallery scene and gallery hops, tons of boutique shopping and locally owned stores, hipsters, hippies, and everything in between. The city does its own thing. Louisville has some crime and political corruption, and also some urban decay...but not quite to NO level.

Like many on the city vs city forums, I used to share the sterotypical notion that midsize cities...Louisville, Richmond, Nashville, New Orleans, Salt Lake, etc etc, I used to think they did not offer much. And then you really eplore them and say, wow, this is just like a big city, but maybe with less hood or less empty parts.

Sure, its no megalopolis, but it offers that historic feel, walkability, sidewalk culture, and ecletic vibe of metros twice its size....all while being cheaper, easier to get around, and more accessible.

Let me give you another example, Charleston SC is much smaller than Louisville, about half the size in CSA....yet in some ways, it offers just as many amenities. And that is the difference between real life and the pen*& size matches at city-data

Last edited by Peter1948; 02-24-2016 at 11:59 PM..
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Old 02-24-2016, 11:57 PM
 
6,305 posts, read 13,208,643 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
I'd like to know how the city compares to New Orleans.

The crime in New Orleans takes a back seat for me, because the culture and vibe of the city makes it worth it. There are many civil issues with the city but yuppies still flock. Would it be a correct assumption that Louisville has far less civil issues like roads, blatant corruption, and terrible city services, but doesn't stack up in culture, vibe, and urbanity?

New Orleans also has the benefit of feeling like a much larger city than the population states. When I'm there it feels like it could be more like a 3 or 4 million MSA. Does Louisville have the same effect?

Bardstown vs Magazine St?
Nulu vs The Marigny?
I am pretty sure Bardstown Rd IS magazine st...

The Marigny is very similar to Nulu, but a bit bigger...but throw in nearby Butchertown and Phoenix Hill, and parts of Germantown, and there is the Bywater/Marigny. Germantown is super hip. I guess its like a bit more gentrified Bywater?

Crescent Hill and Clifton could pass for the Garden District, but that said, you miss some of the antebellum housing, and definitely the trolley transit is lacking.

Imagine a New Orleans not overrun with tourists (although that is RAPIDLY changing in Louisville and while it will never have NO levels of tourists, it speaks volumes all the hotels being built)....that is kind of how Louisville feels to the urbanite. Maybe NO in the off season?

There are just so many areas to see, and you will need a guide to see them and to understand them. Even though Louisville is a good clip larger than NO by every population measure, it feels smaller....but it doesn't act too much so. If New Orleans feels like a metro of 3-4 million to you, I'd say Louisville feels like 2-3 million, especially on the neighborhood level, where it kicks the butt of dozens of metros in the 2-3 million range.

Louisville is such a mythical creature here on CD...I challenge you to come here. Spend a week. Stay at an airbnb in the Highlands. I will hand select one for you. Worst case scenario you eat some good food and drink some bourbon. Best case scenario you find a new home like I did. I would be happy to show you around,

Forecastle Festival: July 15-17, 2016

Come July 15-17 for this festival and thank me later It is like Jazz fest but with Indie music before Jazz Fest got overrun with poser tourists
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Old 02-25-2016, 12:24 AM
 
Location: South Park, San Diego
4,650 posts, read 7,090,420 times
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^^^
It's great to see someone so positive, yet realistic about a city and its ammenities, and limitations. It does make me want to check it out sometime. I am such an urban animal, love historic architecture, but it has to feel vibrant and walkable, or at least have some districts that make up for sleepier, grittier or just not really accessible. The city is definitely on my short list of places to make it a point to explore sometime soon.

When I do I'll take you up on that offer to put me in the right place lol, I've done the same for folks visiting/moving to my city and looking for some direction.
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Old 02-25-2016, 12:28 AM
 
6,305 posts, read 13,208,643 times
Reputation: 2790
Quote:
Originally Posted by T. Damon View Post
^^^
It's great to see someone so positive, yet realistic about a city and its ammenities, and limitations. It does make me want to check it out sometime. I am such an urban animal, love historic architecture, but it has to feel vibrant and walkable, or at least have some districts that make up for sleepier, grittier or just not really accessible. The city is definitely on my short list of places to make it a point to explore sometime soon.

When I do I'll take you up on that offer to put me in the right place lol, I've done the same for folks visiting/moving to my city and looking for some direction.
Just let me know. By the way, San Diego is the dream city. Just so beautiful. I enjoy places like SD better on vacation since i am cheap Louisville is a great home base for that!
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Old 02-25-2016, 08:29 AM
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
9,594 posts, read 20,503,502 times
Reputation: 9083
The Deep South architecture definitely made it's way up river to Louisville. Lots of shotgun houses (actually the same number of them as NOLA)


NOLA
https://www.google.com/maps/@29.9275...8i6656!6m1!1e1


New Albany, across from Louisville
https://www.google.com/maps/@38.2854...7i13312!8i6656
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Old 02-25-2016, 10:22 AM
 
236 posts, read 215,728 times
Reputation: 244
Quote:
Originally Posted by censusdata View Post
Tearing down those huge public housing complexes was just more money spent to undo what the Greatest Generation messed up with urban planning. Putting your poorest citizens in a couple crowded buildings where no one owns their unit or yard was a disaster waiting to happen. We should've dispersed them with housing vouchers all along. I understand most residents resent being moved but it will mean fewer murders in the long run. I know Lexington used to have a very rough neighborhood centered on Georgetown St because of a large complex. Since it was torn down it's now a low income area with few murders.


SF, Manhattan, etc are different in that the poorest are priced out of anywhere to live and often relocate to the Deep South. Louisville will never become so expensive people can't live anywhere nearby. I think that's a good thing. Our society was more functional pre WW2 because rich and poor lived side by side rather than the extreme income segregation going on today.

Well said.
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