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Old 02-28-2016, 10:22 PM
 
6,297 posts, read 13,187,373 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
I didn't word that correctly.
I didn't know about dry counties either.


Is that so? I haven't seen any American city that looks like New Orleans, the only areas where I felt NO was in the Caribbean. Even Louisville's shotguns seem to be more Victorian. But I'm no expert on architecture.

Yeah I guess I didn't word that right about Catholics.

We don't have liquor stores so that's still gonna take some time. We normally go to the nearest store.
That drive-thru is nice!
Never said it was identical, but it is about the closest you will find in the US

I agree Louisville is very much like St Louis and Richmond too, but I see much more of a kindred spirit with NO.

In fact, Louisville had a very large french population from New Orleans who would "summer" here. There is a long hx between Louisville and New Orleans that you need to research.

Louisville's Potential As 'Vice City' — Broken Sidewalk

This article was prophetic...this was pretty much the start of louisville's boom. Much of it is based around bourbon. There were no downtown distilleries at that time. There will be 6 by the end of next year. The restaurant scene has doubled.

They are adding so many hotels/rooms, it will increase downtown hotel capacity by 53% by 2019.

Louisville had many French neighborhoods in the nineteenth century...portland, paristown, the pointe, and even parts of germantown. While the Irish settled places like Limerick, Irish Hill, and Phoenix Hill, and the germans pretty much all over, from butcher town to germantown, st joseph, schnitzelberg, etc.

Read the article above and see why Louisville most closely resembles New Orleans. Theres lots of differences of course, and there is no caribbean, cajon, creole thing, but they still act, function, and look alike.

And Louisville is in the process of converting back to "Vice City." And this was what it was, an old river town full of migrates, ferrymen, bar and brothel owners.

There were so many characters at the time. read here about a Tavern owner, the KY Giant known as Jim Porter:

Jim Porter - The tallest man
(sadly, a longstanding, somewhat tacky nightclub named after him, was demolished last week after 40 years in operation)
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Old 02-29-2016, 09:36 AM
 
7,091 posts, read 3,788,271 times
Reputation: 10580
Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
I didn't word that correctly.
I didn't know about dry counties either.


Is that so? I haven't seen any American city that looks like New Orleans, the only areas where I felt NO was in the Caribbean. Even Louisville's shotguns seem to be more Victorian. But I'm no expert on architecture.

Yeah I guess I didn't word that right about Catholics.

We don't have liquor stores so that's still gonna take some time. We normally go to the nearest store.
That drive-thru is nice!
I'm not buying the whole "Louisville is New Orleans" thing, really, but speaking of Catholics...


St. Martin's has one of the last Tridentine (Latin) masses probably in existence anywhere; it's very cool.
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Old 02-29-2016, 01:20 PM
 
6,297 posts, read 13,187,373 times
Reputation: 2789
Quote:
Originally Posted by otterhere View Post
I'm not buying the whole "Louisville is New Orleans" thing, really, but speaking of Catholics...


St. Martin's has one of the last Tridentine (Latin) masses probably in existence anywhere; it's very cool.
So tell me sir, where is it in the USA that is closer in size, architecture, and even culture to New Orleans than Louisville?
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Old 02-29-2016, 02:50 PM
 
Location: Denver
13,976 posts, read 18,716,549 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter1948 View Post
Never said it was identical, but it is about the closest you will find in the US

I agree Louisville is very much like St Louis and Richmond too, but I see much more of a kindred spirit with NO.

In fact, Louisville had a very large french population from New Orleans who would "summer" here. There is a long hx between Louisville and New Orleans that you need to research.

Louisville's Potential As 'Vice City' — Broken Sidewalk
This article was prophetic...this was pretty much the start of louisville's boom. Much of it is based around bourbon. There were no downtown distilleries at that time. There will be 6 by the end of next year. The restaurant scene has doubled.

They are adding so many hotels/rooms, it will increase downtown hotel capacity by 53% by 2019.

Louisville had many French neighborhoods in the nineteenth century...portland, paristown, the pointe, and even parts of germantown. While the Irish settled places like Limerick, Irish Hill, and Phoenix Hill, and the germans pretty much all over, from butcher town to germantown, st joseph, schnitzelberg, etc.

Read the article above and see why Louisville most closely resembles New Orleans. Theres lots of differences of course, and there is no caribbean, cajon, creole thing, but they still act, function, and look alike.

And Louisville is in the process of converting back to "Vice City." And this was what it was, an old river town full of migrates, ferrymen, bar and brothel owners.

There were so many characters at the time. read here about a Tavern owner, the KY Giant known as Jim Porter:

Jim Porter - The tallest man
(sadly, a longstanding, somewhat tacky nightclub named after him, was demolished last week after 40 years in operation)
The first article isn't available in full anymore. Seems like it could have been a good read.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter1948 View Post
So tell me sir, where is it in the USA that is closer in size, architecture, and even culture to New Orleans than Louisville?
Mobile I'd say. After all, both were in Louisiana at the time and the Spanish built most of the current French Quarter.
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Old 02-29-2016, 06:57 PM
 
6,297 posts, read 13,187,373 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
The first article isn't available in full anymore. Seems like it could have been a good read.

Mobile I'd say. After all, both were in Louisiana at the time and the Spanish built most of the current French Quarter.
The tenants of the article:

In a nutshell, this idea positions Louisville as “New Orleans North.” I can’t help but noticing a few parallels between the two cities.

New Orleans is a river city – Louisville is a river city
New Orleans has a French heritage – Louisville is named after a French king at least, and has adopted a lot of French symbology
New Orleans has great restaurants – Louisville has great restaurants
New Orleans has Southern, historic, genteel neighborhoods and traditions – Louisville also has Southern influenced, historic, genteel neighborhoods and traditions.
New Orleans has a huge reputation as a haven of vice and partying – Louisville used to have that reputation.



Mobile is SOOOOO much smaller than NO. And while some of the culture, and a bit of the architecture is the same (i.e. second biggest mardi gras probably), I am just going to have to disagree here. I am talking more about the shotguns, river city vibe, late night drinking, the long history of drinking, brothels, river rats. Im talking industry and catholics, and even the flooding and natural disaters. Louisville's flood of 1937 was an even bigger flood and disaster than Katrina!
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Old 02-29-2016, 07:07 PM
 
5,622 posts, read 13,311,137 times
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One advantage Mobile has is drinks to go like in NoLa. But architecturally, Louisville is more similar. Also, both are very liberal cities stuck surrounded by some of the most conservative people in America. Mobile is still quite southern and conservative in nearly every way.
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Old 02-29-2016, 07:52 PM
 
Location: Denver
13,976 posts, read 18,716,549 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter1948 View Post
The tenants of the article:

In a nutshell, this idea positions Louisville as “New Orleans North.” I can’t help but noticing a few parallels between the two cities.

New Orleans is a river city – Louisville is a river city
New Orleans has a French heritage – Louisville is named after a French king at least, and has adopted a lot of French symbology
New Orleans has great restaurants – Louisville has great restaurants
New Orleans has Southern, historic, genteel neighborhoods and traditions – Louisville also has Southern influenced, historic, genteel neighborhoods and traditions.
New Orleans has a huge reputation as a haven of vice and partying – Louisville used to have that reputation.



Mobile is SOOOOO much smaller than NO. And while some of the culture, and a bit of the architecture is the same (i.e. second biggest mardi gras probably), I am just going to have to disagree here. I am talking more about the shotguns, river city vibe, late night drinking, the long history of drinking, brothels, river rats. Im talking industry and catholics, and even the flooding and natural disaters. Louisville's flood of 1937 was an even bigger flood and disaster than Katrina!
I was able to catch the first part about the similarities, some are bad examples IMO. Not saying that the author or you are incorrect but the first 3 just seem like surface value type similarities.

River cities are all over the country, I don't know if they are all similar though. Perhaps the distinction should be historical river cities.

New Orleans has world renowned food, every major city has great restaurants, not taking anything away from Louisville at all. I think most cities now have great restaurants, probably related to us millennials.

Both cities seem intrinsically southern aristocrat type cities and I think this comparison is much deeper. Old Louisville and the Garden District are both the epitome of genteel.

Vice, a worthy similarity that not many cities truly share and a characteristic that plays a huge role in the culture of a city. I wish I could have read the whole article. Sounds like a well written piece.

Yeah Mobile is tiny but it looks more similar in the small areas near downtown than the pics I've seen of Louisville so far.
In Mobile the food, culture, weather,history, and industry (fishing, oil and gas) remind me alot of New Orleans.
Quote:
Originally Posted by jessemh431 View Post
One advantage Mobile has is drinks to go like in NoLa. But architecturally, Louisville is more similar. Also, both are very liberal cities stuck surrounded by some of the most conservative people in America. Mobile is still quite southern and conservative in nearly every way.
I didn't know they allowed go cups in Mobile. lol

They are politically very similar. It was good to hear that Louisville was liberal. But New Orleans isn't staunchly liberal such as SF or New York, and I suspect Louisville is the same.
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Old 03-01-2016, 07:17 AM
 
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New Orleans was also established over 100 years earlier, and it shows. Not to mention the diversity of the original population: not just black, white, and Asian Americans, but actually FROM other countries. It's a much more "European" city than Louisville and also has that unique voodoo spirit. It's a feeling...


Nothing remotely close, but that's just my opinion.
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Old 03-01-2016, 09:20 PM
 
6,297 posts, read 13,187,373 times
Reputation: 2789
Quote:
Originally Posted by otterhere View Post
New Orleans was also established over 100 years earlier, and it shows. Not to mention the diversity of the original population: not just black, white, and Asian Americans, but actually FROM other countries. It's a much more "European" city than Louisville and also has that unique voodoo spirit. It's a feeling...


Nothing remotely close, but that's just my opinion.
you dont understand Louisville history. It was hust as European as NO. In the nineteenth century, a good majority of the population was born in Germany, France, Ireland or the British Isles.

Dont let the tourist mecca and New Orleans of today fool you. New Orleans has done alot more right (i.e. preservation) but that doesnt mean theyre not cut from the same tree
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Old 03-02-2016, 03:31 PM
 
94 posts, read 76,248 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter1948 View Post
you dont understand Louisville history. It was hust as European as NO. In the nineteenth century, a good majority of the population was born in Germany, France, Ireland or the British Isles.

Dont let the tourist mecca and New Orleans of today fool you. New Orleans has done alot more right (i.e. preservation) but that doesnt mean theyre not cut from the same tree
I don't know as much about the history of Louisville as some people, but to some extent New Orleans served as a sort of Ellis Island for the South in a way that Louisville never did. I have Italian family who came to New Orleans at the turn of the century who have accents very reminiscent of Brooklyn. One interesting thing is that I believe a lot of the French immigrants themselves moved on, as Portland was heavily French, but today, from what I've read, the residents are mostly descendents of immigrants from Eastern Kentucky and identify as "American," which a lot of people from Eastern Kentucky and West Virginia do. To me, the two cities will always be linked in my mind, but that's probably mostly a function of my family coming from New Orleans.

Idk, to me aside from the shotgun houses brought up the river, Louisville is very much cut from the same cloth as Cincinnati and to a lesser extent Saint Louis. Louisville seems to lack all of the Spanish-influenced architecture that New Orleans has, and the absence of the huge covered patios on many buildings to give shade from the sun and all of the cast iron fencing (I don't know the proper word) gives it a very different feel, and overall Louisville's buildings don't feel particularly Southern compared to places further south, though there are buildings, especially in New Albany, that would fit right in in New Orleans.
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