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Old 05-04-2016, 09:28 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by censusdata View Post
Ammenities are irrelevant in a discussion of being more Southern or Midwestern. Both regions have exciting and boring cities. For this discussion we're comparing Louisville to larger metros like Indy or Cincinnati in terms of accents etc, not orchestras or zoos.
Thanks for steering this back on track.

 
Old 05-04-2016, 10:37 AM
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
9,592 posts, read 20,492,334 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivory Lee Spurlock View Post
Kentucky is in the South. I never questioned it. I lived in Albany when I was very young. But i do believe there were alot of people from Pennsylvania who moved to Kentucky back when this country was being settled. A high percentage of Kentuckians could probably trace their family roots back to Pennsylvania.

Alot of people have a thick accent, I'd call it country-Southern, kinda like Loretta Lynn. Then there's another accent in Kentucky that's Southern, but it's not as dectable, or obvious. I'm thinking of country singer Patty Loveless. I hear that same accent in alot parts of Indiana and Ohio. This week they were interviewing people in Southern Ohio, and everyone of those people they talked to, they had that same accent. If they would have said they were from Kentucky, I would not have questioned it. Perhaps it's the Ohio River Valley accent?
From ages 5 to 11 I lived a little north of Albany (near Russell Springs) and my mom was from there. That had a major impact on my accent. In Indy or Cincinnati people perceive me as having a Southern accent but when I travel in the Deep South people always think I'm from southern Ohio or West Virginia. They never view me as "one of them" in terms of accent. I agree with you that there is a transition zone from Southern to Midwestern accents that is centered on the Ohio Valley. The accents where I live in Southern Indiana are very interesting, some people sound Southern and Midwestern at the same time. My father in law sounds like someone from Wisconsin trying to impersonate and Eastern Kentucky accent.


What I've noticed with Louisville accents that is rare is that because no accent is dominant it seems like children more often keep their parent's accent whether they moved here from Ohio or Eastern Kentucky. In Cincinnati all of my family that moved there from Eastern Kentucky has a strong Midwestern accent by the 2nd generation. My cousins born and raised in Philadelphia talk nothing like their mom who is from rural Kentucky. I think Louisville being a complete Upper South / Lower Midwest hybrid is fascinating. I couldn't imagine living somewhere where you must drive a day away to hear a different accent.
 
Old 05-04-2016, 11:06 AM
 
Location: Arch City
1,724 posts, read 1,108,676 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DubbleT View Post
Hey U, you with the ever changing name, pretty sure we've been down this same road before, but some of us who have been in the south longer than you've been alive do see some southern traits in St Louis. Crazee Cat Lady hit the nail on the head in noting that it too is a mix of midwestern and southern, just as Louisville is. It's made this thread quite interesting to see two of you fighting the same argument from opposite sides. Kinda like watching somebody argue with themselves in a mirror, lmao.
You don't know how long I've been alive. I've been all over the South and see no Southern traits in St. Louis whatsoever. I know you think St. Louis is Southern but you're mistaken.

Last edited by U146; 05-04-2016 at 11:53 AM..
 
Old 05-04-2016, 11:12 AM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
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The recent protesters in Marion, In all sounded southern to me. Listen closely, (not to Ted Cruz, we know where he's from) does anyone else agree or disagree?


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZrFaceZdGkA
 
Old 05-04-2016, 11:44 AM
 
46 posts, read 45,508 times
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I just got back from Louisville, which is a gorgeous city especially compared to St. Louis! St Louis is flat and ugly filled with big box stores. Makes Lville look like paradiese!

Quote:
Originally Posted by U146 View Post
I'm not jealous of Louisville's growth and success. Louisville still has eons to go before it can even compete with the likes of St. Louis or Cincinnati. It is nothing compared to those two cities or any other city in the Midwest. No professional sports teams, no critically acclaimed orchestras, zoos, or museums, all it has is the Kentucky Derby, and college and minor league sports. I'm not at all jealous of Louisville and would never want to live there EVER.
 
Old 05-04-2016, 11:49 AM
 
Location: Arch City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rubing View Post
I just got back from Louisville, which is a gorgeous city especially compared to St. Louis! St Louis is flat and ugly filled with big box stores. Makes Lville look like paradiese!
You've clearly never explored St. Louis in detail. St. Louis is a much bigger metro than Louisville with a lot more to do and a lot more to offer. When I was in Louisville I was glad to return to St. Louis.
 
Old 05-04-2016, 11:51 AM
 
Location: Arch City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by censusdata View Post
From ages 5 to 11 I lived a little north of Albany (near Russell Springs) and my mom was from there. That had a major impact on my accent. In Indy or Cincinnati people perceive me as having a Southern accent but when I travel in the Deep South people always think I'm from southern Ohio or West Virginia. They never view me as "one of them" in terms of accent. I agree with you that there is a transition zone from Southern to Midwestern accents that is centered on the Ohio Valley. The accents where I live in Southern Indiana are very interesting, some people sound Southern and Midwestern at the same time. My father in law sounds like someone from Wisconsin trying to impersonate and Eastern Kentucky accent.


What I've noticed with Louisville accents that is rare is that because no accent is dominant it seems like children more often keep their parent's accent whether they moved here from Ohio or Eastern Kentucky. In Cincinnati all of my family that moved there from Eastern Kentucky has a strong Midwestern accent by the 2nd generation. My cousins born and raised in Philadelphia talk nothing like their mom who is from rural Kentucky. I think Louisville being a complete Upper South / Lower Midwest hybrid is fascinating. I couldn't imagine living somewhere where you must drive a day away to hear a different accent.

Louisville's accent is a typical Upper South accent, as indicated by linguistics maps plus from my own experience. Nothing Northern or Midwestern about it. The Deep South has a different accent from the Upper South.
 
Old 05-04-2016, 11:53 AM
 
Location: South Austin, 78745
2,594 posts, read 1,751,474 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by U146 View Post
There is no Ohio River Valley accent. The kind of Southern spoken in Kentucky and along everywhere in the Ohio River Valley save Cincinnati, which is not a part of the Southern dialect and this is proven by linguistic studies, is the same Southern spoken in Tennessee and other states of the Upper South. It is a Southern accent. And it doesn't appear in the majority of Ohio or Indiana, once again proven by linguistic studies. It's purely your opinion if you think the dialect covers much of Ohio and Indiana because it doesn't.
That's what I hear when I'm in Indiana. And if you think there's no Southern accents in Cincinnati, then you haven't been there or you havent spent much time there. You can't always believe what you read in a book. Dayton to Cincinnati is filled with people from Kentucky.

I think what you are failing to recognize is the large amount of people from the Central and Eastern parts of Kentucky and Tennessee that went to Indiana and Ohio beginning mostly in the 1920's up until about 1970 or so to work in the factories. When they came to Indiana they brought their accents and culture with them, including their food and their music. Go to some of these local online newspapers thru out Central and Southern Indiana, such as the Muncie Star, The Anderson Herald, The New Castle daily newspaper, the Marion daily, and for about a week or so, read the obituaries for where the person came from or where alot of the survivors live, I guarantee you'll see KY and TN mentioned quite a few times. Probably more than any other state after Indiana.

Alot of their kids and grandkids speak with an accent that sounds somewhat Southern, its not as thick but it's definitely there. Best way I can describe it would be "broken English". It's alot different from the accent in Northern indiana.

I noticed people in Indiana who have roots in KY and TN call it "dressing" and it's almost always cornbread dressing. The people in Indiana who have roots in PA and North and East of there, they call it "stuffing", and most of the time, it's bread dressing.
 
Old 05-04-2016, 12:02 PM
 
Location: Arch City
1,724 posts, read 1,108,676 times
Reputation: 846
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivory Lee Spurlock View Post
That's what I hear when I'm in Indiana. And if you think there's no Southern accents in Cincinnati, then you haven't been there or you havent spent much time there. You can't always believe what you read in a book. Dayton to Cincinnati is filled with people from Kentucky.

I think what you are failing to recognize is the large amount of people from the Central and Eastern parts of Kentucky and Tennessee that went to Indiana and Ohio beginning mostly in the 1920's up until about 1970 or so to work in the factories. When they came to Indiana they brought their accents and culture with them, including their food and their music. Go to some of these local online newspapers thru out Central and Southern Indiana, such as the Muncie Star, The Anderson Herald, The New Castle daily newspaper, the Marion daily, and for about a week or so, read the obituaries for where the person came from or where alot of the survivors live, I guarantee you'll see KY and TN mentioned quite a few times. Probably more than any other state after Indiana.

Alot of their kids and grandkids speak with an accent that sounds somewhat Southern, its not as thick but it's definitely there. Best way I can describe it would be "broken English". It's alot different from the accent in Northern indiana.

I noticed people in Indiana who have roots in KY and TN call it "dressing" and it's almost always cornbread dressing. The people in Indiana who have roots in PA and North and East of there, they call it "stuffing", and most of the time, it's bread dressing.
Until you have solid sources backing this up, I'm going to call bull on your statements. Cincinnati is outside of the Southern dialect region and that's a fact.
 
Old 05-04-2016, 12:34 PM
 
Location: South Austin, 78745
2,594 posts, read 1,751,474 times
Reputation: 4380
Quote:
Originally Posted by U146 View Post
Until you have solid sources backing this up, I'm going to call bull on your statements. Cincinnati is outside of the Southern dialect region and that's a fact.
Cincinnati might be out of the Southern dialect region, but it's still not all that unusual to hear a KY accent in Cincinnati. It's really not. Its the same with Indianapolis, especially the southside. I understand you have your statistics and all, but just visit there, get out there and go to the places where blue collar white people might congregate, places like bowling alleys and restaraunts and bars, grocery stores, wal-mart, flea markets, garage sales, etc. I'm pretty sure you'll hear a few Kentucky accents, and more accents that are "sort've" Southern. They sound more like Kentucky than they sound like Northern Indiana, Michigan, and Chicago.

My solid source is my own personal experiences.
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