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Old 06-21-2016, 04:27 PM
eok eok started this thread
 
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Is that area what people mean by the "west end?"

Did those two buildings used to be railroad stations, side by side, in the very distant past?

If I want to buy some bus tickets or a bus pass, is Union Station the place to go for that, or is it just one of several bus stations?

If I park there, is my car at risk of crime?

I wonder what that neighborhood was like back when people mostly took trains to the Derby. I read that even some US presidents took trains to Union Station for the Derby, and there were parties at the station, in Pullman cars etc. It might have been a much nicer neighborhood back then.
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Old 06-22-2016, 04:24 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eok View Post
Is that area what people mean by the "west end?"

Did those two buildings used to be railroad stations, side by side, in the very distant past?

If I want to buy some bus tickets or a bus pass, is Union Station the place to go for that, or is it just one of several bus stations?

If I park there, is my car at risk of crime?

I wonder what that neighborhood was like back when people mostly took trains to the Derby. I read that even some US presidents took trains to Union Station for the Derby, and there were parties at the station, in Pullman cars etc. It might have been a much nicer neighborhood back then.
That is the western edge of downtown. It was historically a train station but has not serviced trains in decades. It is used by TARC for offices and storage.

If you need to take a bus out of Louisville, use megabus.

The west end starts west of 9th street..so yes that area is not the best, but close enough to the dividing line of downtown that is not bad.

Do you live in Louisville? Explore!
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Old 06-22-2016, 06:27 PM
eok eok started this thread
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter1948 View Post
It is used by TARC for offices and storage.
Are they the kind of offices that deal with the general public? Or just internal business offices?

Have you been inside the building? Does it have high ceilings etc., or is it divided into a multi-story office building that looks just like any other building inside?

If you wanted something from TARC, such as bus schedules, a bus map, tickets, senior ID cards, or anything like that, is that the building you would go to, to get that kind of stuff? Or are there other offices too?

Most bus systems, there is a central terminal, where the buses connect with each other. But I don't get the impression this is that kind of place.
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Old 06-23-2016, 08:34 PM
 
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The L&N building is currently the welfare office (Medicaid, food stamps, etc). Union Station is not quite the major central hub that you might think of like in other cities where people are coming and going and making connections.
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Old 06-24-2016, 12:10 AM
eok eok started this thread
 
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If Union Station isn't the central hub, what is? Even if it's not a building, there must be some street somewhere, where buses meet and passengers transfer.

Does the L&N building being the welfare office make the neighborhood worse than it would otherwise be?

Does Union Station have walk-in offices for the general public to do bus business such as buy passes or books of tickets or whatever? Or are there other offices for that kind of stuff?
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Old 06-24-2016, 10:38 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eok View Post
If Union Station isn't the central hub, what is? Even if it's not a building, there must be some street somewhere, where buses meet and passengers transfer.

Does the L&N building being the welfare office make the neighborhood worse than it would otherwise be?

Does Union Station have walk-in offices for the general public to do bus business such as buy passes or books of tickets or whatever? Or are there other offices for that kind of stuff?

That's the thing..this may be the largest US city with no central transit hub. There were once many, but through urban renewal, Louisville's transit was decimated.
Many buses connect around 5th and jefferson or 5th and liberty.

The zero bus is free and a nice way to explore downtown:

https://www.ridetarc.org/zerobus/


Here is the history of Union Station


https://www.ridetarc.org/about/histo...union-station/


You really need to contact Tarc to get the best answers:

https://www.ridetarc.org


Turns out Union Station IS open to the public. I am going to go check it out one day. Even though its been stripped, I hear it is still beautiful. Louisville once had at last 100 buildings as grand as union station....all torn down for surface parking! You can imagine how grand Louisville was before WWII because I think it still has grand buildings and architecture, especially in its urban nabes.

oh BTW....make sure you stop and get some Somali food at the international mall on the way there:

http://www.yelp.com/biz/international-mall-louisville

It looks weird but don't be scared...you walk in and feel like you are in another world! Very neat place



Louisville was a big time city....


Louisville's Incredible Elevated Rapid Transit Trains — Broken Sidewalk
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Old 06-25-2016, 09:26 AM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
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If Union Station isn't the central hub, what is? Even if it's not a building, there must be some street somewhere, where buses meet and passengers transfer.


Louisville doesn't have a central bus hub like Cincinnati, Rochester, or Dayton (three cities that I am aware of that do). Busses transfer at corners downtown, and along certain streets. A particularly busy one being along Jefferson Street.


Does the L&N building being the welfare office make the neighborhood worse than it would otherwise be?

No, the neighborhood across Broadway was mostly housing projects well before the welfare office moved in, but the area around the L&N building itself is mostly parking lots and low density industrial. I should note the L&N Building was never itself a station, just offices for the railroad, & was used as such well into the 1970s, before admin was consolidated to Jacksonville FLA.


Does Union Station have walk-in offices for the general public to do bus business such as buy passes or books of tickets or whatever? Or are there other offices for that kind of stuff?

Yes it does. It also has secured visitor parking directly behind the building.


They have a customer service counter in the middle of the old waiting room, schedules, maps, and you can buy passes and tokens there. It's a pretty neat space and worth the visit even if you are not buying a bus pass. The interior has been mostly restored, still has the stained glass windows, just no pew seats like you'd find in train station.
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Old 06-25-2016, 10:53 AM
eok eok started this thread
 
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Lots of great info here. I noticed a food truck visible in a Google Maps street view parked just north of the two buildings, named "M&M Wings" and then it says "Cooking from the Heart". I'm curious to know if anyone reading this has ever tried that, and if they usually park there.

I also noticed, a few blocks east, the Gene Snyder Federal Building at 601 W Broadway, has a mostly green roof. Does that imply the roof is made mostly of copper?
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Old 06-25-2016, 08:17 PM
 
6,296 posts, read 13,182,702 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayton Sux View Post
If Union Station isn't the central hub, what is? Even if it's not a building, there must be some street somewhere, where buses meet and passengers transfer.


Louisville doesn't have a central bus hub like Cincinnati, Rochester, or Dayton (three cities that I am aware of that do). Busses transfer at corners downtown, and along certain streets. A particularly busy one being along Jefferson Street.


Does the L&N building being the welfare office make the neighborhood worse than it would otherwise be?

No, the neighborhood across Broadway was mostly housing projects well before the welfare office moved in, but the area around the L&N building itself is mostly parking lots and low density industrial. I should note the L&N Building was never itself a station, just offices for the railroad, & was used as such well into the 1970s, before admin was consolidated to Jacksonville FLA.


Does Union Station have walk-in offices for the general public to do bus business such as buy passes or books of tickets or whatever? Or are there other offices for that kind of stuff?

Yes it does. It also has secured visitor parking directly behind the building.


They have a customer service counter in the middle of the old waiting room, schedules, maps, and you can buy passes and tokens there. It's a pretty neat space and worth the visit even if you are not buying a bus pass. The interior has been mostly restored, still has the stained glass windows, just no pew seats like you'd find in train station.

Dayton.....Union Station WAS a major train station and terminal. Even in the 1990s I took a train here from Chicago. the L&N bldg is a different bldg that has always been offices since it was built 100+ yrs ago.

Upon further research, it was a major train hub until the 1960s or so, and then Amtrak cam back there briefly in the 1990s. This was my first discovery of Louisville and my thought was "man this city has so much potential and seems to have been asleep of years!"

Now the city has done a 180...there is a new 100 million plus project announced seemingly every week. This week was the announcement of three 400+ foot high-rises in the cherokee triangle neighborhood.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kentucky_Cardinal
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Old 06-26-2016, 12:00 AM
eok eok started this thread
 
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I'm curious to know how much your round-trip ticket cost from Chicago in the 1990's. Was Amtrak very popular or was it considered expensive compared to cheap airlines?
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