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Old 07-04-2016, 02:55 PM
 
922 posts, read 1,404,849 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter1948 View Post
There is no contest between Louisville and Nashville. And I am glad you think as highly of NAshville as I do of Louisville. But don't come in here acting like Louisville is this rusting Detroit city because you know very well, even if only based on my posts of factual development, that it is not.
I would tend to agree that there's no contest, but the OP's question was comparing the two cities. So the OP can tell from the back-and-forth and the CofC jingoism from certain characters, that his/her perception of Nashville is accurate. And several others here even mention the "old money problem" of the wealthy power structure that resists progress in Louisville. As pointed out here, Nashville is a faster paced, more innovative REGION (and that's the key here) versus a city that apparently is still divided very much by class (to wit: "What high school did you go to?"). So those "sprawlburbs" may not do much for some people, but they have jobs, jobs and jobs. Cool Springs alone contains more Fortune 500 headquarters than exist in the whole state of KY. And newer is exciting because it points to an attraction of people and wealth. Everyone on City Data knows that. So despite all the words spilled here, I don't see where the OP's point was refuted. That Nashville feels larger and more exciting to the OP, the "newer, shinier city with a flashier, more advanced tourist friendly and compact , active dt." is apparently what the OP sees. Since this is the L'ville forum, I'll leave you with that.
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Old 07-07-2016, 03:38 PM
 
6,295 posts, read 13,176,543 times
Reputation: 2789
Quote:
Originally Posted by shinestx View Post
I would tend to agree that there's no contest, but the OP's question was comparing the two cities. So the OP can tell from the back-and-forth and the CofC jingoism from certain characters, that his/her perception of Nashville is accurate. And several others here even mention the "old money problem" of the wealthy power structure that resists progress in Louisville. As pointed out here, Nashville is a faster paced, more innovative REGION (and that's the key here) versus a city that apparently is still divided very much by class (to wit: "What high school did you go to?"). So those "sprawlburbs" may not do much for some people, but they have jobs, jobs and jobs. Cool Springs alone contains more Fortune 500 headquarters than exist in the whole state of KY. And newer is exciting because it points to an attraction of people and wealth. Everyone on City Data knows that. So despite all the words spilled here, I don't see where the OP's point was refuted. That Nashville feels larger and more exciting to the OP, the "newer, shinier city with a flashier, more advanced tourist friendly and compact , active dt." is apparently what the OP sees. Since this is the L'ville forum, I'll leave you with that.
Louisville is not divided any more than most cities. Louisville has racial and socioeconomic problems just like Nashville.

Louisville has 3 fortune 500's in the city limits.

Nashville has 1 in the city and 5 others in the suburbs. So again you are misleading people. And you also fail to mention that until 3 or so years ago, Louisville MSA had 3 Fortune 500's and Nashville had 4...but Nashville suburbs had two companies barely crack the top 500 in the last 2 years.

Nasvhille nor Louisville are not complete cities. While Nashville has the edge in downtown (for now), Louisville easily wins in neighborhoods, architecture, and authentic urbanity. Louisville's downtown is actually not bad, and certainly I would say is average at this point. It's just that Nashville's downtown is stellar and the emphasis of the community. That's great.

And guess what? That's about to change as Louisivlle should have 10 urban bourboon distilleries open by 2020 in downtown. There are thousands of apartments and hotel rooms under construction. You try to make Louisville look like the rust belt and no one is buying it. Louisville is doing well, just not as well as Nashville, and I still say the MAJORITY of that is nothing to do with Nashville itself, but more about building a brand (country music), being the capital, and have a low tax, business friendly environment.

Your biggest nightmare should be KY getting its act together. Although Bevin is pretty much no good, he is making some business friendly changes with the cut the red tape initiative
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Old 07-07-2016, 04:56 PM
 
2,391 posts, read 3,866,540 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stymie13 View Post
I live here currently in st Mathews (adjacent to the highlands).

But after this contract expires, moving to Charleston, sc.

Highlands parking is atrocious, our new bridges are tolls, traffic continues to get worse.

On the flip side, tons of restaurants and night life if that's your thing.

Sounds like you live around where I do
I agree with the parking in the Highland. It's awful~!
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Old 07-07-2016, 06:29 PM
 
94 posts, read 75,946 times
Reputation: 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stymie13 View Post
I live here currently in st Mathews (adjacent to the highlands).

But after this contract expires, moving to Charleston, sc.

Highlands parking is atrocious, our new bridges are tolls, traffic continues to get worse.

On the flip side, tons of restaurants and night life if that's your thing.
I really wonder what you expect in terms of parking in Charleston if you are so unhappy with the Highlands. Ample parking means there is less density and buildings built in the period when not every single person over the age of 16 had to have a car, which really seems to be the main draw of a city like Charleston that gives it is character. I'm also always skeptical of anyone that complains about parking in the Highlands. I only lived there for a year but go all the time in a car even at the busiest times and even though you probably can't park right in front of the house or bar you want to go to, there is always a spot at most a few blocks away; a 5-minute walk isn't going to kill you.
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Old 07-07-2016, 09:06 PM
 
Location: Denver
13,976 posts, read 18,700,116 times
Reputation: 8380
Quote:
Originally Posted by cubedeathk View Post
I really wonder what you expect in terms of parking in Charleston if you are so unhappy with the Highlands. Ample parking means there is less density and buildings built in the period when not every single person over the age of 16 had to have a car, which really seems to be the main draw of a city like Charleston that gives it is character. I'm also always skeptical of anyone that complains about parking in the Highlands. I only lived there for a year but go all the time in a car even at the busiest times and even though you probably can't park right in front of the house or bar you want to go to, there is always a spot at most a few blocks away; a 5-minute walk isn't going to kill you.
Sounds like a light rail system would do wonders. How's the bus network?
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Old 07-08-2016, 06:22 PM
 
922 posts, read 1,404,849 times
Reputation: 1041
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter1948 View Post
Louisville is not divided any more than most cities. Louisville has racial and socioeconomic problems just like Nashville.

Louisville has 3 fortune 500's in the city limits.

Nashville has 1 in the city and 5 others in the suburbs. So again you are misleading people. And you also fail to mention that until 3 or so years ago, Louisville MSA had 3 Fortune 500's and Nashville had 4...but Nashville suburbs had two companies barely crack the top 500 in the last 2 years.

Nasvhille nor Louisville are not complete cities. While Nashville has the edge in downtown (for now), Louisville easily wins in neighborhoods, architecture, and authentic urbanity. Louisville's downtown is actually not bad, and certainly I would say is average at this point. It's just that Nashville's downtown is stellar and the emphasis of the community. That's great.

And guess what? That's about to change as Louisivlle should have 10 urban bourboon distilleries open by 2020 in downtown. There are thousands of apartments and hotel rooms under construction. You try to make Louisville look like the rust belt and no one is buying it. Louisville is doing well, just not as well as Nashville, and I still say the MAJORITY of that is nothing to do with Nashville itself, but more about building a brand (country music), being the capital, and have a low tax, business friendly environment.

Your biggest nightmare should be KY getting its act together. Although Bevin is pretty much no good, he is making some business friendly changes with the cut the red tape initiative
Back to the OP's point. I think the numbers speak for themselves. I said Cool Springs, which is not in the Nashville city limit. But no doubt, the OP is referring to those many prosperous areas along the Interstates as s/he drives to/through the Nashville MSA. After all, we are discussing regions here. As you pointed out, the Nashville MSA is home to more F500 than exist in the whole state of KY. Plus, two more are on track to crack the F500 in the next year or two, Brookdale and Envision Health. Never said that L'ville is like Detroit; I just made the comparison to a union-run city going "rogue" as you suggested L'ville should do in a breakaway from KY. And let's not overlook that not-so-fine point, that L'ville is a far more unionized city (i.e. blue collar) than N'ville. In that regard it is more like a city in the Midwest ("rustbelt" cities). This back-and-forth got me to check some of your recent posts and you even acknowledge that L'ville is more Midwestern than Southern. I would agree with that, and a heavy union presence is a key reason for that. So if you want to discuss favorable business climates, then you need to start there.

As the OP noted, we're talking about the regions here, and even you noted that the two cities' downtowns are not even comparable. What did I point out, 17-18 skyscrapers under construction at this very moment (and they're privately developed vs. publicly assisted). To the point I made in my earlier post; that underscores the differences. One of your fellow L'ville posters here even noted that downtown L'ville is dead in too many areas. And I think even you would agree that that is what the OP is referring to.
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Old 07-08-2016, 06:28 PM
 
Location: louisville
4,754 posts, read 1,819,136 times
Reputation: 1708
Quote:
Originally Posted by cubedeathk View Post
I really wonder what you expect in terms of parking in Charleston if you are so unhappy with the Highlands. Ample parking means there is less density and buildings built in the period when not every single person over the age of 16 had to have a car, which really seems to be the main draw of a city like Charleston that gives it is character. I'm also always skeptical of anyone that complains about parking in the Highlands. I only lived there for a year but go all the time in a car even at the busiest times and even though you probably can't park right in front of the house or bar you want to go to, there is always a spot at most a few blocks away; a 5-minute walk isn't going to kill you.
I run hill sprints up dog hill in our heat and humidity. I don't mind walking. I have an older f150 because I do so much outdoors and I love remodeling. Try parking a truck in the highlands. It's miserable.

I'm also 43. I lived right behind Phoenix hill on Payne all through my teens to mid 20s. I loved the area. Now, I'm older, and not so enraptured.

Charleston is different. I wouldn't live in the historic district for the exact reason I wouldn't live in the highlands. Too much congestion.
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Old 07-08-2016, 06:32 PM
 
Location: louisville
4,754 posts, read 1,819,136 times
Reputation: 1708
Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
Sounds like a light rail system would do wonders. How's the bus network?
On the main lines, like highlands, shelbyville, brownsboro, and, gasp Dixie, fantastic. All 4 mains feed downtown and pretty much the 4 directions of sw, central, east, ne.
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Old 07-09-2016, 07:42 AM
 
6,295 posts, read 13,176,543 times
Reputation: 2789
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stymie13 View Post
On the main lines, like highlands, shelbyville, brownsboro, and, gasp Dixie, fantastic. All 4 mains feed downtown and pretty much the 4 directions of sw, central, east, ne.
Also the BRT line has started on Dixie highway. There are plans to place BRT on a few other arterials.
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Old 07-09-2016, 08:30 AM
 
6,295 posts, read 13,176,543 times
Reputation: 2789
Quote:
Originally Posted by shinestx View Post
Back to the OP's point. I think the numbers speak for themselves. I said Cool Springs, which is not in the Nashville city limit. But no doubt, the OP is referring to those many prosperous areas along the Interstates as s/he drives to/through the Nashville MSA. After all, we are discussing regions here. As you pointed out, the Nashville MSA is home to more F500 than exist in the whole state of KY. Plus, two more are on track to crack the F500 in the next year or two, Brookdale and Envision Health. Never said that L'ville is like Detroit; I just made the comparison to a union-run city going "rogue" as you suggested L'ville should do in a breakaway from KY. And let's not overlook that not-so-fine point, that L'ville is a far more unionized city (i.e. blue collar) than N'ville. In that regard it is more like a city in the Midwest ("rustbelt" cities). This back-and-forth got me to check some of your recent posts and you even acknowledge that L'ville is more Midwestern than Southern. I would agree with that, and a heavy union presence is a key reason for that. So if you want to discuss favorable business climates, then you need to start there.

As the OP noted, we're talking about the regions here, and even you noted that the two cities' downtowns are not even comparable. What did I point out, 17-18 skyscrapers under construction at this very moment (and they're privately developed vs. publicly assisted). To the point I made in my earlier post; that underscores the differences. One of your fellow L'ville posters here even noted that downtown L'ville is dead in too many areas. And I think even you would agree that that is what the OP is referring to.
Shine....you are not getting it. Louisville does not need to build these shiny new buildings because they are busy rehabbing 3 story ones (but Louisville IS building several high and midrises including a 400 plus footer U/C and also several 8-15 story buildings also U/C). There was even a proposal recently for 3, 30-40 story condo towers in a dense residential area unlike any other in Nashville, which is Louisville's Cherokee Triangle. These neighborhoods from 1900 or so, when Louisville was much more prominent than Nashville, cannot be recreated in Nashville.


Nashville has a better downtown only because its neighborhoods cannot compete with Louisville's. Like, its not even close, especially when you realize that downtown Jeffersonville and New Albany, only a couple miles from the CBD, are most definitely urban neighborhoods of the city too. So they are two different cities in different stages of development.

And as Nashville works to densify and make cooler its urban nabes (east nashville a prime example), Louisville is working to rebuild its downtown destroyed by urban renewal.

There are literally TONS of construction projections going on as you can see by the post I made. Over 80 something just over 3 million. So Louisville no slouch in new construction either, and compared to the majority of its midwest peers, has as much or more construction going on.

And despite the naysayers, downtown Louisville is VERY vibrant in about half of it. Its just there are certain "dead" zones, and currrently the only true totally dead zone is the SW quandrant. This is the area from Broadway, 9th st, east to 6th, and north to the south side of market. This was the largest urban renewal area that was destroyed and although there is zero blight, the surface parking gives a sense of emptiness. This area is mostly federal, state, government buildings, city and jail, etc. So its a civic district and frankly, outside maybe 5 cities, most large cities have dead civic areas, especially at nights and weekends.

4th, main, and market, along with the waterfront, are literally packed with people almost every night and weekend. This is no exagerration as anymmore, there is almost always an event downtown, even if its just a Bats baseball game or a Yum center event. Certainly the conventions help. Louisville's new Omni and convention center will be just as nice or nicer than that in Nashville. So shinestx, with all due respect, I think you have Louisville wrong. Even Louisville's Nulu area, with the amount of development going on...many are comparing it to the Gulch from 5-10 years ago. One of downtown's 6 tower cranes is in Nulu and for a midrise being developed by a prominent Nashville developer as a matter of fact.


Furthermore, as I noted the city and county of Louisville is substantially denserand more populated than Nashville. This is not to mention that the urban core of Louisville is much larger in a geographic sense, so there is more "infill" to do


Until the last 5 years, Nashville's west and NW neighborhoods outside of downtown, behind the capital were totally dead. For example, Nashville's Jefferson St reminds me of 9th st in LOuisville. Not the best area, but they have been building tons of 4 story apartment bldgs in the area that I find very mundane and it is a very "vacant" area. Louisville will do a very similar development when it redevelops the Beecher Terrace project next year.


Unfortunately, some of the bad urban precedent from urban renewal continues to this day, albeit at a slower base. Look at this Antebellum neighborhood Louisville demolished:

http://brokensidewalk.com/2016/spald...tion-timeline/

Last edited by Peter1948; 07-09-2016 at 08:45 AM..
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