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Old 11-28-2016, 07:58 AM
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
9,593 posts, read 20,495,960 times
Reputation: 9082

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Based on my knowledge of Louisville and Google Streetview I'm sticking with my thesis that the tree problem is mainly in rental areas rather than affluent areas.


West End - no trees


https://www.google.com/maps/@38.2380...2!8i6656?hl=en


West End adjacent to Shawnee Park, lots of trees


https://www.google.com/maps/@38.2434...2!8i6656?hl=en


Old Louisville - affluent St James Court, lots of trees


https://www.google.com/maps/@38.2279...2!8i6656?hl=en


Smoketown - few trees


https://www.google.com/maps/@38.2403...2!8i6656?hl=en


Audubon Park - lots of trees


https://www.google.com/maps/@38.2053...2!8i6656?hl=en
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Old 11-28-2016, 09:10 AM
 
Location: Denver
13,979 posts, read 18,750,562 times
Reputation: 8391
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter1948 View Post
This topic is mainly about trees. Annie, I am interested to hear your views. Did you find Louisville to be a treeless city? Or did you not visit yet? Stats show it is 37% tree coverage, which is much greener than most metros.

Louisville is at 37% but that's not good enough. It has a goal of 45%

https://louisvilleky.gov/government/...opy-assessment

Louisville would be number one tree canopy on this list:

Tree Cover % How Does Your City Measure Up? | DeepRoot Blog

Anecdotally, after spending tons of time in Atlanta, I agree it also has lots of trees, and feels very tree lined just like Louisville. Like Louisville, id could use more trees downtown, but Atlanta's downtown is so urban even compared to Louisville's, where do you plant trees?
I haven't been to Louisville yet.
I didn't see Louisville on the list though, how do you search for cities on that website?
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Old 11-28-2016, 02:46 PM
 
79 posts, read 81,343 times
Reputation: 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter1948 View Post
Everyone is buying what I say. Louisville is one of the most tree covered cities in the US. Louisville has 37% trees. Thats a FACT. Where are your facts?

So, because you "drove a few streets" you are an expert on Louisville? I agree this is not a "city vs city" thread, but we are talking about TREES and you brought up a Midwest declining city north of Chicago which is 11% trees. Louisville blows that city out of the water in aesthetics, especially parks and green aesthetics. I know because I have spent significant time in both.

I think you have spent more than two weeks in Louisville, so do you want to disclose to everyone your agenda here, Phil?
Moderator cut: -. I'm talking about neighborhoods, specific ones where the tree canopy is less than 25%. That 37% number is a reflection on the city as a whole which includes several parks including Jefferson Memorial which figures in to the whole picture but there are still areas including Germantown which has very little tree canopy and its these areas that my question refers too. By the way, I never claimed my last visit was my only one, in the last 4 years we have visited Lou 5 times and never less than a week, just the last visit was the longest because we came down for the sole purpose of looking for homes to purchase.

Last edited by Oldhag1; 11-28-2016 at 07:00 PM.. Reason: Please focus on the topic only, not other posters
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Old 11-28-2016, 02:50 PM
 
79 posts, read 81,343 times
Reputation: 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by censusdata View Post
Based on my knowledge of Louisville and Google Streetview I'm sticking with my thesis that the tree problem is mainly in rental areas rather than affluent areas.


West End - no trees


https://www.google.com/maps/@38.2380...2!8i6656?hl=en


West End adjacent to Shawnee Park, lots of trees


https://www.google.com/maps/@38.2434...2!8i6656?hl=en


Old Louisville - affluent St James Court, lots of trees


https://www.google.com/maps/@38.2279...2!8i6656?hl=en


Smoketown - few trees


https://www.google.com/maps/@38.2403...2!8i6656?hl=en


Audubon Park - lots of trees


https://www.google.com/maps/@38.2053...2!8i6656?hl=en
If Germantown is affluent as you claim ( Strictly middle class if you ask me ) and has a small percentage of rentals than why is the area void of much tree cover ? Kind of contradicts your theory
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Old 11-28-2016, 09:28 PM
 
6,305 posts, read 13,203,006 times
Reputation: 2790
Quote:
Originally Posted by natguy View Post
If Germantown is affluent as you claim ( Strictly middle class if you ask me ) and has a small percentage of rentals than why is the area void of much tree cover ? Kind of contradicts your theory
Well. Its upper middle class with lots of affluent young professionals mixed in. The neighborhood is 120+ years old. So some stuff will look old and forlorn but its just old. Its one of the most urban, dense, single family neighborhoods in the southeast US. There are still some old timer retirees like old German folks, or old blue collar workers mixed in, but they are being pushed out. Low income renters are becoming almost nonexistent just in the last year. They're all being pushed north of the railroad tracks (Shelby Park)

Lately, there have been rehabbers at work on almost every block. No, you cannot tell me this is not the case because I know every single block there and own investment property there. Drive around every street there and you will find at lest one dumpster in front of a house on almost every block. The dumpster in the front or alley is a sign of a rehab. This is one of the hottest neighborhoods in the southeast, and has been written up in national publications. Very hip area, and only getting more so as evidenced by the retailers going in such as :

https://insiderlouisville.com/lifest...mr-lees-opens/

Very similar to the Violet Hour in Chicago.
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Old 11-29-2016, 06:26 AM
 
79 posts, read 81,343 times
Reputation: 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter1948 View Post
Well. Its upper middle class with lots of affluent young professionals mixed in. The neighborhood is 120+ years old. So some stuff will look old and forlorn but its just old. Its one of the most urban, dense, single family neighborhoods in the southeast US. There are still some old timer retirees like old German folks, or old blue collar workers mixed in, but they are being pushed out. Low income renters are becoming almost nonexistent just in the last year. They're all being pushed north of the railroad tracks (Shelby Park)

Lately, there have been rehabbers at work on almost every block. No, you cannot tell me this is not the case because I know every single block there and own investment property there. Drive around every street there and you will find at lest one dumpster in front of a house on almost every block. The dumpster in the front or alley is a sign of a rehab. This is one of the hottest neighborhoods in the southeast, and has been written up in national publications. Very hip area, and only getting more so as evidenced by the retailers going in such as :

https://insiderlouisville.com/lifest...mr-lees-opens/

Very similar to the Violet Hour in Chicago.
I agree its an up and coming area and gentrifying quickly but I disagree that its upper Middle class and as defined here and specifically based on income status I would be correct
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Upper_middle_class
Rehabbed homes can be had in the 175 to 225K range which is typical of middle class incomes not upper incomes. I would say Germantown is more in line with the Hipster subculture of the middle class as defined here
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hipste...ary_subculture)
As far as the original claim, I still stand by it and one not need to look any further than Goss av. to see there is nary a mature tree every 1000 feet or so
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Old 11-29-2016, 07:19 AM
 
6,305 posts, read 13,203,006 times
Reputation: 2790
Quote:
Originally Posted by natguy View Post
I agree its an up and coming area and gentrifying quickly but I disagree that its upper Middle class and as defined here and specifically based on income status I would be correct
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Upper_middle_class
Rehabbed homes can be had in the 175 to 225K range which is typical of middle class incomes not upper incomes. I would say Germantown is more in line with the Hipster subculture of the middle class as defined here
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hipste...ary_subculture)
As far as the original claim, I still stand by it and one not need to look any further than Goss av. to see there is nary a mature tree every 1000 feet or so
natguy, Goss Ave is a VERY urban street. You are correct there are not a lot of mature trees. They were probably never planted in the 1890s when this area developed.

I also agree Germantown is very hipster, almost comically so. I also can't disagree the area is middle class, but there are tons of upper middle class. While these "hipster kids" may only have 40k incomes, that's a lot in Louisville, and also, many come from parents with money so they live larger...big phones, TVs, nice cars. etc.
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Old 11-30-2016, 05:52 AM
 
79 posts, read 81,343 times
Reputation: 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter1948 View Post
natguy, Goss Ave is a VERY urban street. You are correct there are not a lot of mature trees. They were probably never planted in the 1890s when this area developed.

I also agree Germantown is very hipster, almost comically so. I also can't disagree the area is middle class, but there are tons of upper middle class. While these "hipster kids" may only have 40k incomes, that's a lot in Louisville, and also, many come from parents with money so they live larger...big phones, TVs, nice cars. etc.
I think you nailed it there ...( kids" may only have 40k incomes, that's a lot in Louisville )
40K a year wont even qualify you for a home in most of Chicago and the burbs. Its this mindset that I have to keep in perspective and convince the wife that she is not likely to make 100K a year as she does now in a comparable job. Cost of living in considerably lower in Lou I keep telling her...Homes are cheaper, commute times are shorter and most importantly taxes are a mere fraction of what we pay now
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