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Old 12-30-2016, 01:43 PM
 
31 posts, read 25,710 times
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Hi all,

I'm currently a second semester junior at a public university in Illinois. I will graduate in the Spring of 2018 with an Adult & Community Education degree with a Spanish minor and Latin American Studies minor (it was only two more classes). I know mentioning my student loan burden is important to include in terms of budgeting, ect. That said, I will have approximately $35,000 is student loans once I graduate.

That said, my degree is very human service-oriented. Anticipated job placement ranges from non-profits (not on the top of my list), workforce development, student success centers at college/universities, and community efforts for non-English speaking individuals (hence, my chosen minors). My take-home income will probably be around the same as my student loans, which isn't not great. However, that's also based off central Illinois economy and cost of living.

I have done previous research and I've found that Louisville is a relatively cheap midwestern/southern city. Does that hold true for those of you more familiar with the area? If it turns out that it's too expensive, I'll find another option. I think that's a pretty simple formula for success. Thank you nonetheless!

1. Where could a human service worker live comfortably? I mentioned my anticipated income. I do plan to get a second job for nights and weekends to supplement my income. Are roommates a reliable option, given the price? Cheaper suburbs, 20-30 minutes away? I don't plan on living in the thick of the city by any means (despite how cool it may seem).

2. What's the weather like? I can imagine it's pretty similar to my currently place of residence (central Illinois) but I'm just curious.

3. I know that Louisville is roughly 3% Hispanic. Not a huge population but being bilingual will always be valuable some way or another. However, is the human service sector well-funded/supported? I know in Illinois, human services are constantly facing budget cuts.

4. Is Louisville easily adaptable? I mean that in the most literal sense. I come from a very small farming town of 4,400 people. After getting my feet wet, some experience and know-how, is Louisville a pretty easy place to commute in? Driving vs. public transportation, specifically.

5. This really is not as important to others as it is to me, but what's the music scene like? I'm an avid concert goer and I know that Louisville does get some killer up-and-coming bands. That said, are there any cool local venues, record stores, and bars? What are some of your favorites?

6. I've heard that Portland prides itself on most things local. Is that claim generally true? Are there plenty of options? I imagine there are a lot due to its size but I ask anyways!

7. Lastly, this isn't specific just to Louisville, but what colleges/universities are close? Graduate school is a definite possibility and, obviously, I know of U of L. Are there any other options?

I can't really think of anything else at the moment. If you have any more information, suggestions, hints, tips, or fun facts, please let me know! I genuinely appreciate your help! Thank you so much!
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Old 12-30-2016, 01:58 PM
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
9,585 posts, read 20,468,292 times
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1. You can spend $1500 a month for luxury housing but you can also get a decent older 1 br apartment for $650 or less even in nicer areas.

2. Similar to Central IL but daily average would be about 7 degrees warmer per day with half as much winter snow.

3. Kentucky's new governor as been cutting some things but that sector seems to be doing OK. Indiana has a great budget situation with few cuts. There is a growing refugee population in addition to Hispanic population.

4. A huge construction project just completed and has made downtown freeway traffic flow much better. Still a handful of places with rush hour delays on the Watterson Expressway. Bus service is pretty good inside I-264. Louisville is neither the best or worst city for transit.

5. Louisville is a good live music city and home to a large music festival called Forecastle.


6. Louisville does great for its size in terms of local restaurants and shops. Highest concentration is in urban corridors east of downtown like Bardstown Rd and Frankfort Ave.

7. Mainly U of L, a few at IU Southeast and Bellarmine U. Univ of Kentucky is a large school just over an hour to the east.
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Old 01-03-2017, 01:29 PM
 
5,620 posts, read 13,306,784 times
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1. If you're fine being 20-30 minutes away from the city, there are PLENTY of options with your income. There are quite a few apartment complexes in good neighborhoods with one bedrooms in your price range most likely, depending on how much you're willing to spend. And don't rule out Southern Indiana. Oftentimes, it's closer to the cultural amenities Louisville offers, at a much lower cost. Only issue is that now the bridges are being tolled. But if you don't mind paying a bridge toll for a cheaper COL and slower pace of life, you might like Southern Indiana also. There are quite a few apartment complex in northeast city/Jefferson County that are affordable. If you want to keep it even cheaper and don't mind being in a not-as-great area, the South End has some nice complexes also. It's more affordable, but has a bit more crime. By no means dangerous, but more working-class/blue-collar.

2. It's not too different, but probably a bit warmer year-round. Much less snow I'd assume also.

3. Kentucky has one of the fastest growing Hispanic populations. I'm bilingual in Spanish as well and love interacting with the Latino community. The city is a refugee relocation center for lots of Cubans. The Mexican population is growing in the region for farming communities and general labor. Apparently Shelby County directly east of Louisville has a large Mexican population for its farming economy. The South End and in general just southern portions of Jefferson County has a lot of Hispanic businesses. With a quickly growing Hispanic immigrant population, that usually will mean the need for bilingual workers is on the rise. The immigrants generally are not going to be bilingual in English well enough for all their needs. As a new community, not enough are in these job sectors to support the population. But I do know the Latino community here is prevalent and growing quickly. It's not segregated just to the South End; that was just an example of a large concentration. Moving from LA, I know my Mexican food. My favorite taqueria is on Westport Road more in northeast. There is a Cuban bakery/grocery store on Bardstown Road and just in general that is a strong visible presence of a growing Latin community here that will be needing your bilingual services.

Cuts will be a big issue with our current administration at the state level, but at a city/county level, the government is quite progressive and will continue doing its best to fund these services.

4. Louisville a perfectly sized city for those coming from small towns who wish to live in a larger metro. For me, coming from LA, it's small. But I know plenty of people who moved here from small rural towns in KY and IN and love it. The traffic is a breeze relative to the size and amenities offered in the city. Public transit is lacking the further you move away from downtown. But if you stay inside the 264 loop, it's pretty good. The best neighborhoods for public transit use would be Old Louisville, Germantown, Schnitzelburg, The Highlands, and NuLu. The most confusing part for me about Louisville is that I'm used to major cities with grids (from LA, went to college in SF, spent a lot of time in NYC and Chicago). Outside of the core neighborhoods, the suburban sprawl causes me to use Waze or Google Maps when traveling almost anywhere. So that's just something you might have to do for a while. I've been here 3 years now and still use it today to navigate.

5. This depends on the time of music you like. Personally, I like electronic music, and that scene is severely lacking in Louisville. most raves or festivals or DJs go to Cincinnati or Nashville, sometimes Indy. Lately, we've been getting more, but nothing like the bigger cities surrounding us. If you like rock and/or local bands, Louisville is great! There are too many concert venues like those to mention. But the most well-known would probably be Headliners, Diamond Pub, Mercury Ballroom, and Palace Theater. But smaller places like Manny & Merle's, Gerstle's, Baxter's, and others regularly host live bands also. Idk enough about the record stores. The general bar scene here is fun. I'm just used to having more options since I'm from a bigger city. Coming from a much smaller town, you'll love all the bar options here. My favorite part is the 4am last call! And as censusdata mentioned, Forecastle is huge here!

6. There is a big local scene here. The "cooler" neighborhoods like NuLu, Butchertown, Clifton, Germantown, and the Highlands have basically no national chain stores/restaurants aside from the few Starbucks, McDonald's, and Chase Banks. They're almost entirely local though. Louisville and KY as a whole brew plenty of local beers that you'll never need to order a Bud Light ever again. And obviously all the bourbon is local. Bardstown Road through the Highlands is one of the coolest streets in the country probably for local restaurants and shops.

7. Censusdata covered this basically, but I'll answer anyway. University of Louisville, Bellarmine University, Indiana University Southeast offers in-state tuition to Louisville area residents, Spalding University, Sullivan University, and yes University of Kentucky is one hour east. UofL and UK offer some joint degrees as well.
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Old 01-03-2017, 01:32 PM
 
1,387 posts, read 716,971 times
Reputation: 601
Quote:
Originally Posted by jessemh431 View Post
1. If you're fine being 20-30 minutes away from the city, there are PLENTY of options with your income. There are quite a few apartment complexes in good neighborhoods with one bedrooms in your price range most likely, depending on how much you're willing to spend. And don't rule out Southern Indiana. Oftentimes, it's closer to the cultural amenities Louisville offers, at a much lower cost. Only issue is that now the bridges are being tolled. But if you don't mind paying a bridge toll for a cheaper COL and slower pace of life, you might like Southern Indiana also. There are quite a few apartment complex in northeast city/Jefferson County that are affordable. If you want to keep it even cheaper and don't mind being in a not-as-great area, the South End has some nice complexes also. It's more affordable, but has a bit more crime. By no means dangerous, but more working-class/blue-collar.

2. It's not too different, but probably a bit warmer year-round. Much less snow I'd assume also.

3. Kentucky has one of the fastest growing Hispanic populations. I'm bilingual in Spanish as well and love interacting with the Latino community. The city is a refugee relocation center for lots of Cubans. The Mexican population is growing in the region for farming communities and general labor. Apparently Shelby County directly east of Louisville has a large Mexican population for its farming economy. The South End and in general just southern portions of Jefferson County has a lot of Hispanic businesses. With a quickly growing Hispanic immigrant population, that usually will mean the need for bilingual workers is on the rise. The immigrants generally are not going to be bilingual in English well enough for all their needs. As a new community, not enough are in these job sectors to support the population. But I do know the Latino community here is prevalent and growing quickly. It's not segregated just to the South End; that was just an example of a large concentration. Moving from LA, I know my Mexican food. My favorite taqueria is on Westport Road more in northeast. There is a Cuban bakery/grocery store on Bardstown Road and just in general that is a strong visible presence of a growing Latin community here that will be needing your bilingual services.

Cuts will be a big issue with our current administration at the state level, but at a city/county level, the government is quite progressive and will continue doing its best to fund these services.

4. Louisville a perfectly sized city for those coming from small towns who wish to live in a larger metro. For me, coming from LA, it's small. But I know plenty of people who moved here from small rural towns in KY and IN and love it. The traffic is a breeze relative to the size and amenities offered in the city. Public transit is lacking the further you move away from downtown. But if you stay inside the 264 loop, it's pretty good. The best neighborhoods for public transit use would be Old Louisville, Germantown, Schnitzelburg, The Highlands, and NuLu. The most confusing part for me about Louisville is that I'm used to major cities with grids (from LA, went to college in SF, spent a lot of time in NYC and Chicago). Outside of the core neighborhoods, the suburban sprawl causes me to use Waze or Google Maps when traveling almost anywhere. So that's just something you might have to do for a while. I've been here 3 years now and still use it today to navigate.

5. This depends on the time of music you like. Personally, I like electronic music, and that scene is severely lacking in Louisville. most raves or festivals or DJs go to Cincinnati or Nashville, sometimes Indy. Lately, we've been getting more, but nothing like the bigger cities surrounding us. If you like rock and/or local bands, Louisville is great! There are too many concert venues like those to mention. But the most well-known would probably be Headliners, Diamond Pub, Mercury Ballroom, and Palace Theater. But smaller places like Manny & Merle's, Gerstle's, Baxter's, and others regularly host live bands also. Idk enough about the record stores. The general bar scene here is fun. I'm just used to having more options since I'm from a bigger city. Coming from a much smaller town, you'll love all the bar options here. My favorite part is the 4am last call! And as censusdata mentioned, Forecastle is huge here!

6. There is a big local scene here. The "cooler" neighborhoods like NuLu, Butchertown, Clifton, Germantown, and the Highlands have basically no national chain stores/restaurants aside from the few Starbucks, McDonald's, and Chase Banks. They're almost entirely local though. Louisville and KY as a whole brew plenty of local beers that you'll never need to order a Bud Light ever again. And obviously all the bourbon is local. Bardstown Road through the Highlands is one of the coolest streets in the country probably for local restaurants and shops.

7. Censusdata covered this basically, but I'll answer anyway. University of Louisville, Bellarmine University, Indiana University Southeast offers in-state tuition to Louisville area residents, Spalding University, Sullivan University, and yes University of Kentucky is one hour east. UofL and UK offer some joint degrees as well.
How do the Hispanics tolerate the cold of northern KY? What is drawing them to that region when the climate and such is totally different than their homelands?
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Old 01-03-2017, 01:42 PM
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
9,585 posts, read 20,468,292 times
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Originally Posted by MOforthewin View Post
How do the Hispanics tolerate the cold of northern KY? What is drawing them to that region when the climate and such is totally different than their homelands?
Tons of Hispanics in far colder climates than here like Chicago. I rarely see Mexican license plates up here, Hispanics with out of state tags are usually CA, AZ, or TX. I assume they move here for the low COL and to work jobs that locals don't want. It's not easy finding an American worker who won't call in every weekend. I did restaurant work growing up and the people from Mexico or Bosnia were much better workers than teenage Americans.
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Old 01-03-2017, 01:45 PM
 
5,620 posts, read 13,306,784 times
Reputation: 2880
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Originally Posted by MOforthewin View Post
How do the Hispanics tolerate the cold of northern KY? What is drawing them to that region when the climate and such is totally different than their homelands?
"Kentucky is among the top states receiving resettled refugees due to a large federal refugee resettlement program here. Last year Kentucky accepted 2,048 refugees, according to the Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR), a division of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Sixty-one percent of those refugees settled in Louisville. And those numbers are only expected to increase."
Louisville leads the way in refugee resettlement

It's not so much that they're choosing here personally, but Louisville is a refugee resettlement city. Cubans and Middle Easterners and all others classified as refugees are given resources to settle down here. Catholic Charities and Kentucky Refugee Ministries and I think a few others are heavily involved. I have volunteered with Catholic Charities. They find housing for recent refugees and provide them with the essentials to start based off donations. Toiletries, kitchen supplies, a few articles of clothing, and whatever other basic essentials are distributed to each new family.

I'd assume the Cubans are heavily relocated here because Miami can't handle all of them. Louisville just happens to be a city they are relocated to. A recent article explaining this was published in our local newspaper. Many of the Cuban refugees love that they were relocated here. Easier pace of life, easier to make a living here than in Florida, less hectic, lower COL, easier to open a unique business. Havana Rumba is an amazing Cuban restaurant full of Cuban immigrants/refugees.

Chicago actually has a huge Mexican population as well. IMO, if I was moving somewhere to just simply have a better quality of life, to escape poverty and gangs and social problems, I wouldn't complain about where I could find a job. I'd rather go through a Midwest winter than worry daily about being killed by drug lords, ISIS, or a communist regime. The quality of life is just better for them, and they wouldn't complain about it. And that's often how ethnic enclaves begin. A few show up and more and more family and friends hear about how great it is and they continue moving there. Just look at Minneapolis. Largest Somali population. And Somalia is hot AF year round, while Minneapolis is cold AF in winter.

The Mexican population here is moving for the farming jobs in the surrounding counties. Yeah, California has a ton of farming and a large Latino population to farm them and they could always use the help. But I'd assume the COL in California deters many, and it's oversaturated with farm workers already I bet. KY is not and offers a lower COL.

A quick few others I can think of. NYC's Puerto Rican population. North Jersey's Brazilian and Cuban populations. Philly's Puerto Ricans. Camden is a hot spot for Puerto Ricans escaping poverty in PR. Yes, that's right lol. Camden is better than PR right now. Even with the winter and crime and poverty, Puerto Ricans are finding Camden to have a better QOL for their family than PR. RI and parts of MA also have large Brazilian populations. All colder than Louisville, but overall they all have a good QOL, they already have established immigrant communities in which they can find their own cuisine, their own grocery stores, make friends with similar cultures, etc.
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Old 01-03-2017, 01:56 PM
 
Location: IL/IN/FL/CA/KY/FL
1,124 posts, read 799,197 times
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Pretty accurate statements above - also plenty of Hispanics in KY because of the horse farms. Farmhands for general crop/livestock are also on the rise. I've had a couple of Central KY farmers tell me recently that even if they wanted to find local farmhands, they can't find people that would do it for the pay, and the people they're getting now are much better workers anyhow.
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Old 01-03-2017, 05:46 PM
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
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Are the Cubans up here refugees? I thought most of them came here of their own choice and many are middle or upper class. To my knowledge Louisville's refugee population was mostly from Vietnam and is now dominated by Syria, Nepal, Somalia, Congo, and Bhutan.


Mexicans and Central Americans moved to Kentucky for jobs in labor intensive tobacco and horse farming industries as American workers became harder to come by the 1980s. I suspect after moving here for farm jobs they later moved into other industries and told friends and family that it was a good place. It's the same thing that happened when my family members moved from Appalachia to Ohio and Michigan. One person finds work and pretty soon family members follow. Dozens of people in my extended family ended up in just a couple neighborhoods in Cincinnati and Detroit.
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Old 01-03-2017, 06:49 PM
 
5,620 posts, read 13,306,784 times
Reputation: 2880
Quote:
Originally Posted by censusdata View Post
Are the Cubans up here refugees? I thought most of them came here of their own choice and many are middle or upper class. To my knowledge Louisville's refugee population was mostly from Vietnam and is now dominated by Syria, Nepal, Somalia, Congo, and Bhutan.


Mexicans and Central Americans moved to Kentucky for jobs in labor intensive tobacco and horse farming industries as American workers became harder to come by the 1980s. I suspect after moving here for farm jobs they later moved into other industries and told friends and family that it was a good place. It's the same thing that happened when my family members moved from Appalachia to Ohio and Michigan. One person finds work and pretty soon family members follow. Dozens of people in my extended family ended up in just a couple neighborhoods in Cincinnati and Detroit.
They're not all considered refugees per se, but have special admittance privileges to the US. While volunteering with Catholic Charities, I noticed that most refugees were Cuban, Syrian, Iraqi, Afghani, Vietnamese, and Somali. The Latino population here is very heavily Cuban.

Fastest-Growing Immigrant Group in Louisville, Kentucky? Cuban Americans - NBC News
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Old 01-03-2017, 09:37 PM
 
1,387 posts, read 716,971 times
Reputation: 601
Quote:
Originally Posted by jessemh431 View Post
"Kentucky is among the top states receiving resettled refugees due to a large federal refugee resettlement program here. Last year Kentucky accepted 2,048 refugees, according to the Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR), a division of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Sixty-one percent of those refugees settled in Louisville. And those numbers are only expected to increase."
Louisville leads the way in refugee resettlement

It's not so much that they're choosing here personally, but Louisville is a refugee resettlement city. Cubans and Middle Easterners and all others classified as refugees are given resources to settle down here. Catholic Charities and Kentucky Refugee Ministries and I think a few others are heavily involved. I have volunteered with Catholic Charities. They find housing for recent refugees and provide them with the essentials to start based off donations. Toiletries, kitchen supplies, a few articles of clothing, and whatever other basic essentials are distributed to each new family.

I'd assume the Cubans are heavily relocated here because Miami can't handle all of them. Louisville just happens to be a city they are relocated to. A recent article explaining this was published in our local newspaper. Many of the Cuban refugees love that they were relocated here. Easier pace of life, easier to make a living here than in Florida, less hectic, lower COL, easier to open a unique business. Havana Rumba is an amazing Cuban restaurant full of Cuban immigrants/refugees.

Chicago actually has a huge Mexican population as well. IMO, if I was moving somewhere to just simply have a better quality of life, to escape poverty and gangs and social problems, I wouldn't complain about where I could find a job. I'd rather go through a Midwest winter than worry daily about being killed by drug lords, ISIS, or a communist regime. The quality of life is just better for them, and they wouldn't complain about it. And that's often how ethnic enclaves begin. A few show up and more and more family and friends hear about how great it is and they continue moving there. Just look at Minneapolis. Largest Somali population. And Somalia is hot AF year round, while Minneapolis is cold AF in winter.

The Mexican population here is moving for the farming jobs in the surrounding counties. Yeah, California has a ton of farming and a large Latino population to farm them and they could always use the help. But I'd assume the COL in California deters many, and it's oversaturated with farm workers already I bet. KY is not and offers a lower COL.

A quick few others I can think of. NYC's Puerto Rican population. North Jersey's Brazilian and Cuban populations. Philly's Puerto Ricans. Camden is a hot spot for Puerto Ricans escaping poverty in PR. Yes, that's right lol. Camden is better than PR right now. Even with the winter and crime and poverty, Puerto Ricans are finding Camden to have a better QOL for their family than PR. RI and parts of MA also have large Brazilian populations. All colder than Louisville, but overall they all have a good QOL, they already have established immigrant communities in which they can find their own cuisine, their own grocery stores, make friends with similar cultures, etc.
I'm from Missouri, and in St. Louis we did have some Mexicans, more of them it seemed as time went on. I moved from St. Louis in summer 2015. Most of them did landscaping work and shoveling snow in the winter the rare times we get enough snow that requires shoveling which isn't often in St. Louis.

St. Louis was also taking in some of those too. I wonder if this will change now that the Kentucky state house finally has switched to Republican majority and KY elected a Republican governor last year. Will the new KY governor and Republican state house try and stop the relocation of Syrian refugees?

Things are that bad in Camden that it's better than PR? Camden is like East St. Louis on steroids.

Louisville weather is very similar to St. Louis and I can't imagine living in MN. Just too cold there. It cost a hell of a lot more to live in MA or RI compared to Louisville or St. Louis. How can immigrants make it on the high cost of living even with welfare and all the other gubermint handouts?

It does cost a lot more to live here in Florida compared to Kentucky or Missouri where I'm from. While I don't get taxed state income tax on my paycheck, overall the pay in Florida is low, housing cost more here, car insurance, gas cost more and it cost a TON to register your car here when you move to Florida and we got toll roads and such. Things overall were much cheaper for us in Missouri which I'm sure Kentucky is the same way. If I would have done it again I'd stay in Missouri and put up with 4 months of cold weather and much better gun laws which is a hobby of mine. Also Florida is congested and overall the pace is a lot faster than Missouri down here. People are in a hurry all the time and hot headed.
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