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Old 01-15-2019, 07:55 PM
 
6,376 posts, read 13,407,389 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ServoMiff View Post
Louisville is a super friendly city - however, I think it's next to impossible to make friends if you're not from there (unless you specifically seek out those who aren't from there originally). Strangers will talk to you in public all over the place, but it's a surface level friendliness not unlike the same you get in southern towns. It's kind and genuine but they generally don't want to add friends to their group.

EDIT - someone replied to me and used the term "insular and limited in their world views" to describe native Louisvillians and I 1000% agree with this. You'll find very few natives who have explored anywhere outside of Florida or Myrtle Beach. My landlord was a perfect example of this - refused to fly and only drove down to Destin for vacations.

I even grew up in Louisville, but left for college and returned 20 years later and it was impossible for us to find other couples that fit our personalities. If you're a church-goer and have kids then you'll be in better shape than we were. We left Louisville again in October and haven't looked back.

This is not at all to say that Louisville is a bad town. It's not.

It's a great sports town despite no pro teams. It is a fantastic food town compared to others its size. It's not nearly as sprawled as the bigger cities so when it's not rush hour you can really get to anything you want within 25 minutes.

The state has some absolutely stunning parks and recreation which can be done on day trips.

Downtown Louisville has come up a LOT since I was a child, but it's not all that vibrant during the week. There is ALWAYS something going on in the city every weekend, so there's plenty of options when it's not snowing out.

If I have a complaint about Louisville it's that people can't drive to save their lives. Our car insurance doubled moving back there from San Francsico. You heard that right... There's a wreck pretty much every work day during one portion of the commute that snarls traffic, and even more in the evenings because the city is so tied to cars and because of the liquor culture (home of bourbon).

I would really appreciate once you've moved in for 6 months to come back here and provide your opinion on the city to help out.

The Highlands and St Matthews are great options as others have mentioned.


I am going to 100% disagree with this. I find that many people here like to blame an entire metro area for their lack of friends. To the OP, since you had no problems on meetup.com and are willing to put yourself out there, you will have few if any problems.

Louisville is definitely no more clicky than any other 1-2 million metro area. Yes, the question where they ask about what HS you went to is annoying to many transplants, but you get that question in any midsized city.
Servo's posts are eerily similar to another guy who claimed to have moved from Louisville to SF. Odd...not sure if they are expecting Louisville to be SF or what.

And finally, Louisville is no "small city." With a top 30 city population, number 35 CSA, and top 45 MSA, its squarely a very nice sized, mid sized city.

To echo the millenial who chimed in above, there is lots of opportunity to meet new people, particularly inside the 264 belt. Servo lived well outside that belt and may have led to some of his perceived isolation.

It's fine if someone likes a city, but to say they grew up in a place, moved back and then had no friends...I just find it odd and substantially more a reflection of the person than the city. 1.3 million people....go out and meet people! At the very least, there are lots more transplants here than ever before and one of the fastest rising immigrant populations in the USA, including for one, a top ten Cuban population.

Let me say this as a final warning, often times Louisville's BIGGEST nasayers areexpatriots. It's the weirdest thing but for some reason the ones that move away and never come back...they want to see the city fail and seem not to agree with others who like it. I personally haven't found a more charming and livable city and I have spent extensive time in every major US city including living in over a half dozen full time.
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Old 01-16-2019, 08:54 PM
 
Location: IL/IN/FL/CA/KY/FL
1,135 posts, read 847,098 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter1948 View Post
I am going to 100% disagree with this. I find that many people here like to blame an entire metro area for their lack of friends. To the OP, since you had no problems on meetup.com and are willing to put yourself out there, you will have few if any problems.

Louisville is definitely no more clicky than any other 1-2 million metro area. Yes, the question where they ask about what HS you went to is annoying to many transplants, but you get that question in any midsized city.
Servo's posts are eerily similar to another guy who claimed to have moved from Louisville to SF. Odd...not sure if they are expecting Louisville to be SF or what.

And finally, Louisville is no "small city." With a top 30 city population, number 35 CSA, and top 45 MSA, its squarely a very nice sized, mid sized city.

To echo the millenial who chimed in above, there is lots of opportunity to meet new people, particularly inside the 264 belt. Servo lived well outside that belt and may have led to some of his perceived isolation.

It's fine if someone likes a city, but to say they grew up in a place, moved back and then had no friends...I just find it odd and substantially more a reflection of the person than the city. 1.3 million people....go out and meet people! At the very least, there are lots more transplants here than ever before and one of the fastest rising immigrant populations in the USA, including for one, a top ten Cuban population.

Let me say this as a final warning, often times Louisville's BIGGEST nasayers areexpatriots. It's the weirdest thing but for some reason the ones that move away and never come back...they want to see the city fail and seem not to agree with others who like it. I personally haven't found a more charming and livable city and I have spent extensive time in every major US city including living in over a half dozen full time.
Yes, we know you will die holding the Louisville city flag. You've made that plenty obvious over the years. I don't begrudge you of that either. You clearly see something that so many others don't and that's totally cool. You know me and my posts quite well from the last 4-5 years as well, but you've disagreed and provided no evidence that has been backed up by others unlike the agreement I've gotten from at least 2 people.

How many native Louisvillians do you call close friends now? Probably very few. It is entirely possible for a non-native to make friends there, but you have to put yourself out there much more and hope that those people/couples you meet share the same values and whatnot.

As the poster who is in their mid 20's attested to, you can make friends in your 20's pretty much anywhere a lot more easily because it's the singles years and everyone is much more open to meeting and there are plenty of activities in the city on weekends. The issue with Louisville for a couple like my wife and I (who are in our 40's and 30's respectively), is that we don't have kids and we're very much centrists politically - Louisville's DINKS tend to be quite far to the left (though not as far left as the standard San Franciscan) and it is very much a family oriented city otherwise. You will have much better success than us if you have kids and/or attend a church which provides a social connection to the locals, or if you're just more liberal.

As I clearly stated, I think Louisville has made great strides over the years, and it is a beautiful city with a thriving food and bourbon scene, but it is not without its faults just like any other city.

Most people who leave a city generally don't like it because it didn't work for them. I'm not sure how that's a revelation unique to Louisville.

I believe I provided MY perspective on my time in the town and I have no desire to see it fail even one bit. But, it just isn't a town for us for multiple reasons. It's still a great town to be a real estate investor and when the next market dip occurs, I will be putting money back into the city, just not my presence.
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Old 01-16-2019, 10:01 PM
 
6,376 posts, read 13,407,389 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ServoMiff View Post
Yes, we know you will die holding the Louisville city flag. You've made that plenty obvious over the years. I don't begrudge you of that either. You clearly see something that so many others don't and that's totally cool. You know me and my posts quite well from the last 4-5 years as well, but you've disagreed and provided no evidence that has been backed up by others unlike the agreement I've gotten from at least 2 people.

How many native Louisvillians do you call close friends now? Probably very few. It is entirely possible for a non-native to make friends there, but you have to put yourself out there much more and hope that those people/couples you meet share the same values and whatnot.

As the poster who is in their mid 20's attested to, you can make friends in your 20's pretty much anywhere a lot more easily because it's the singles years and everyone is much more open to meeting and there are plenty of activities in the city on weekends. The issue with Louisville for a couple like my wife and I (who are in our 40's and 30's respectively), is that we don't have kids and we're very much centrists politically - Louisville's DINKS tend to be quite far to the left (though not as far left as the standard San Franciscan) and it is very much a family oriented city otherwise. You will have much better success than us if you have kids and/or attend a church which provides a social connection to the locals, or if you're just more liberal.

As I clearly stated, I think Louisville has made great strides over the years, and it is a beautiful city with a thriving food and bourbon scene, but it is not without its faults just like any other city.

Most people who leave a city generally don't like it because it didn't work for them. I'm not sure how that's a revelation unique to Louisville.

I believe I provided MY perspective on my time in the town and I have no desire to see it fail even one bit. But, it just isn't a town for us for multiple reasons. It's still a great town to be a real estate investor and when the next market dip occurs, I will be putting money back into the city, just not my presence.
Servo, your points are valid and well taken. I do find most my BEST friends seem to be transplants or "boomerangs" the term for Louisvillians who moved away for college then came back many years later. Like you, I am also a real estate investor on the side and I am making a KILLING here. I'm sure that helps my positive impressions! I also don't think you DISLIKE Louisville. Quite the contrary. I do feel you haven't engaged with it, and may have been led that way by your spouse. That's my impression based on your posts....and I have provided quite a bit of evidence why you cannot judge a metro of 1.3 M based on maybe the few hundred you interacted with and maybe found colloquial?

I do count at least 2 native Louisville close friends. But, they do seem to me a bit different I think as myself as sort of a traveler.

I think your particular situation is hard in ANY city! 40s/30s with no kids. I do think the moderates have the most trouble finding friends in any city. Do you really think your experience would have been much different even in Raleigh? New Orleans? Nashville? Or was it a uniquely Louisville thing? I don't think it was, you just need to be a in a true mega city and that's fine. I for one have discovered the joys of the mid sized city!

But being in Louisville just a year, there is absolutely zero chance you engaged with the community as well as you could have. I highly doubt you were volunteering every week or on meetup.com in different groups. I have provided plenty evidence.....Louisville's biggest naysayers are natives like you who you find in large cities across the country. Even if they moved back to their hometown, they truly didn't really LIVE it. I ran into Louisville natives in CA a few months back...they asked, "WHY would I live THERE?" I then quizzed them and they couldn't tell me a darn thing about the modern city! I clued them in on so much, block by block. Louisville natives who leave have what I call, the "mini Detroit affect."

They never made a year where they were at one of the amazing street fests almost every weekend. They didn't do brunch every weekend, didn't do the museums and Speed art and cinema nights, didn't do the zombie walk or the Pride fests....and almost exclusively lived in some cookie cutter suburb ala Jtown or Middletown which grossly skewed their daily perception. They drove into their suburban garage, scoffed at a couple bad drivers in redneck trucks, and wondered why their neighbors in an isolated subdivision wouldn't bring them cheesecake?

No, Louisville isn't the best sling since sliced bread....but it's certainly one of the best medium large slices of bread. I do find there are a few native homers, but many of the modern Louisville evangelists, people like myself, Gil Holland, even Christy Brown (who married into the local Brown family) are all the biggest fans and cheerleaders what Louisville IS today, and what it is becoming.
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Old 01-22-2019, 04:38 PM
 
Location: downtown phoenix
1,006 posts, read 1,310,376 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ServoMiff View Post
Louisville is a super friendly city - however, I think it's next to impossible to make friends if you're not from there (unless you specifically seek out those who aren't from there originally). Strangers will talk to you in public all over the place, but it's a surface level friendliness not unlike the same you get in southern towns. It's kind and genuine but they generally don't want to add friends to their group.

EDIT - someone replied to me and used the term "insular and limited in their world views" to describe native Louisvillians and I 1000% agree with this. You'll find very few natives who have explored anywhere outside of Florida or Myrtle Beach. My landlord was a perfect example of this - refused to fly and only drove down to Destin for vacations.

I even grew up in Louisville, but left for college and returned 20 years later and it was impossible for us to find other couples that fit our personalities. If you're a church-goer and have kids then you'll be in better shape than we were. We left Louisville again in October and haven't looked back.

This is not at all to say that Louisville is a bad town. It's not.

It's a great sports town despite no pro teams. It is a fantastic food town compared to others its size. It's not nearly as sprawled as the bigger cities so when it's not rush hour you can really get to anything you want within 25 minutes.

The state has some absolutely stunning parks and recreation which can be done on day trips.

Downtown Louisville has come up a LOT since I was a child, but it's not all that vibrant during the week. There is ALWAYS something going on in the city every weekend, so there's plenty of options when it's not snowing out.

If I have a complaint about Louisville it's that people can't drive to save their lives. Our car insurance doubled moving back there from San Francsico. You heard that right... There's a wreck pretty much every work day during one portion of the commute that snarls traffic, and even more in the evenings because the city is so tied to cars and because of the liquor culture (home of bourbon).

I would really appreciate once you've moved in for 6 months to come back here and provide your opinion on the city to help out.

The Highlands and St Matthews are great options as others have mentioned.
I agree with everything you have said here and I feel it's entirely been my experience in Louisville. Especially the Florida or myrtle beach thing. When I lived there people would look at me as if I were insane when I told them I was vacationing in San Francisco, Sedona or Santa Fe.
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Old 01-31-2019, 08:09 PM
 
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I am a transplant as well - even though I'm a bit younger than you are the process is still similar. Louisville can be very easy to make friends but it takes work (doesn't it always?). You have to be willing to put yourself out there. That being said, I know there are several Meetup groups for women in your demographic that would be great for you. There are clubs around town that do philanthropic work - Junior League, Women's Club, etc. That's a great way to get involved.

As far as neighborhoods, I agree with what others have said. The Highlands is a great area. It's very urban, eclectic, and happening. When I lived there, I rarely drove my care because everything was within walking distance. If you like the busy-ness of city life - the Highlands definitely has it. There are some coveted residential streets tucked back towards Cherokee Park - but anything near Bardstown Road is busy.

Clifton and Crescent Hill are great as well and I would argue feel more residential while still being very close to all the happenings of urban life. I currently own a home in Clifton but I've also lived in the Highlands and in Lyndon (which wouldn't be appropriate for you based on your posts).

I love St. Matthews as well. It's more commercial while the Highlands and Clifton/Crescent Hill are where you're going to find a lot of local businesses and restaurants. I don't recommend living in Old Louisville. The architecture is gorgeous and in the summer they have free Shakespeare plays in the park - but many parts of dicey IMO. The same goes with downtown for me.
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Old 01-31-2019, 08:32 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Peter1948 View Post
I am going to 100% disagree with this. I find that many people here like to blame an entire metro area for their lack of friends. To the OP, since you had no problems on meetup.com and are willing to put yourself out there, you will have few if any problems.

Louisville is definitely no more clicky than any other 1-2 million metro area. Yes, the question where they ask about what HS you went to is annoying to many transplants, but you get that question in any midsized city.
Servo's posts are eerily similar to another guy who claimed to have moved from Louisville to SF. Odd...not sure if they are expecting Louisville to be SF or what.

I'm curious as to what other cities you have lived in and for how long, just to put a frame of reference on your perspective.
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Old 02-01-2019, 12:00 AM
 
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Originally Posted by oceangaia View Post
I'm curious as to what other cities you have lived in and for how long, just to put a frame of reference on your perspective.
I have lived all over the country and traveled extensively to all major top 50 metros.

I spent most my young life in Chicago. I have lived in various parts of Chicago, FL, Ohio, Indianapolis. I have spent brief stints in Nashville and Atlanta. Most places I traveled for work I lived for at least a year. Louisville is the best midsized city in America, it just doesn't know it.

The only comparable cities are Austin and New Orleans, and possibly Richmond. Louisville has a more urban, authentic feel than Austin, though.
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Old 02-01-2019, 12:05 PM
 
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Well I'd have to say my experience is similar to Servo's. Born and raised there, lived in Valley Station and Lyndon, moved forever to Texas in 1988. I won't speak to how it is today but I haven't seen much change in the people I still know there.

The ville was a "local" population. Most were born and raised there or pulled in from other parts of Ky. I knew a few from Michigan. A Californian was unheard of and a guy from Florida was popular because people in Ky are in majestic awe of anyone who actually lived in Florida. But they would never move there because it wasn't "realistic", life is about working and raising a family not being on vacation all the time.

I had lots of friends and when I left none my friends and family could understand why I would even consider of such an idea. Despite having never lived elsewhere, they were all convinced that no other place is better and I would be back. It took almost 20 years before they quit asking when I was moving back home. Which is odd because I wasn't the first to leave. I had an aunt and uncle who left in 1970 forever to raise kids and grandkids in Texas. I had another aunt and uncle who left in 1980 forever to raise kids and grandkids in Kansas.

I had to chuckle at the Destin comment. My two sisters take their fams to Destin every year. I had them meet mine once at Navarre and they felt like they were "branching out". I even had one meet me in the Keys but that was too much for the other. My brother has been to Myrtle Beach about ten times. None have passports or have ever stepped outside the USA except when I was 10 my dad took us all to Niagara Falls and we hopped over to the Canadian side for a few hours. Every spring they mention visiting me in the summer but end up going to Destin or Myrtle Beach. Meanwhile, in the last 5 years I've made 18 trips to 7 different countries.

Now in a metro of a million you will find subsets of everything. What we are talking about here is the general atmosphere overall. And I think it's telling that some of the same things keep getting said, that I don't see get said in other cuty forums. I have to say, no one has ever asked me in Texas what high school I went to. (Ballard)

Another thing, Cats or Cards. Nothing identifies you as an outsider more than not rooting for the Cats or the Cards. Pick one. Those who root for both are a) outsiders or b) families with split alumni. (Go Rockets. Huh? What's a rocket?) You might slide if you actually attended another state school like WKU and support that school. Just keep it quiet when UofL is handing them their annual beatdown.

The people I still know there still seem to think Louisville is the center of the universe. My bro will ask what I think of the current UofL team or if I saw their game against Duke. I have to explain I live in a pro sports town halfway across the country and I might hear about the Cards if they make the Final Four and I see the story about it on page 5. My sister will let me know about a new craft mini-brewery that opened as if I don't have dozens nearby. My mom will proudly announce that there is a Kohls where the dilapidated Kmart used to be. They all want to know who I'm betting on in the Derby and can't believe I didn't realize it was Derby week and don't know who is running. These are good people who mean well but it's like they cannot even imagine that what is going on in their world is not going on anywhere else. I'll be in Costa Rica next week and while I imagine the locals have all heard that Trump hates immigrants and wants to build a wall, I doubt most know anything about a polar vertex or govt shutdown or who's playing in the Superbowl.

Last edited by oceangaia; 02-01-2019 at 12:18 PM..
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Old 02-01-2019, 10:00 PM
 
6,376 posts, read 13,407,389 times
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Originally Posted by oceangaia View Post
Well I'd have to say my experience is similar to Servo's. Born and raised there, lived in Valley Station and Lyndon, moved forever to Texas in 1988. I won't speak to how it is today but I haven't seen much change in the people I still know there.

The ville was a "local" population. Most were born and raised there or pulled in from other parts of Ky. I knew a few from Michigan. A Californian was unheard of and a guy from Florida was popular because people in Ky are in majestic awe of anyone who actually lived in Florida. But they would never move there because it wasn't "realistic", life is about working and raising a family not being on vacation all the time.

I had lots of friends and when I left none my friends and family could understand why I would even consider of such an idea. Despite having never lived elsewhere, they were all convinced that no other place is better and I would be back. It took almost 20 years before they quit asking when I was moving back home. Which is odd because I wasn't the first to leave. I had an aunt and uncle who left in 1970 forever to raise kids and grandkids in Texas. I had another aunt and uncle who left in 1980 forever to raise kids and grandkids in Kansas.

I had to chuckle at the Destin comment. My two sisters take their fams to Destin every year. I had them meet mine once at Navarre and they felt like they were "branching out". I even had one meet me in the Keys but that was too much for the other. My brother has been to Myrtle Beach about ten times. None have passports or have ever stepped outside the USA except when I was 10 my dad took us all to Niagara Falls and we hopped over to the Canadian side for a few hours. Every spring they mention visiting me in the summer but end up going to Destin or Myrtle Beach. Meanwhile, in the last 5 years I've made 18 trips to 7 different countries.

Now in a metro of a million you will find subsets of everything. What we are talking about here is the general atmosphere overall. And I think it's telling that some of the same things keep getting said, that I don't see get said in other cuty forums. I have to say, no one has ever asked me in Texas what high school I went to. (Ballard)

Another thing, Cats or Cards. Nothing identifies you as an outsider more than not rooting for the Cats or the Cards. Pick one. Those who root for both are a) outsiders or b) families with split alumni. (Go Rockets. Huh? What's a rocket?) You might slide if you actually attended another state school like WKU and support that school. Just keep it quiet when UofL is handing them their annual beatdown.

The people I still know there still seem to think Louisville is the center of the universe. My bro will ask what I think of the current UofL team or if I saw their game against Duke. I have to explain I live in a pro sports town halfway across the country and I might hear about the Cards if they make the Final Four and I see the story about it on page 5. My sister will let me know about a new craft mini-brewery that opened as if I don't have dozens nearby. My mom will proudly announce that there is a Kohls where the dilapidated Kmart used to be. They all want to know who I'm betting on in the Derby and can't believe I didn't realize it was Derby week and don't know who is running. These are good people who mean well but it's like they cannot even imagine that what is going on in their world is not going on anywhere else. I'll be in Costa Rica next week and while I imagine the locals have all heard that Trump hates immigrants and wants to build a wall, I doubt most know anything about a polar vertex or govt shutdown or who's playing in the Superbowl.

Give me a break. You and people like you...most of who left Louisville in its down times of the 70s to early 90s....are the biggest adversaries for the city. You spread more negative perception about the city than any other place I have EVER seen. In this way, Louisville very much has a "detroit effect" to it.

There are TONS of transplants in the area now. This is supported by census data. It is really painful to see the same people run around the country and bash their hometown.

Don't act like that's all that is going on here is a couple microbreweries (if you want to get technical, the metro area boasts close to 40 at my last count plus dozens of bourbon distilleries). World class parks, museums, and bourbon atractions are being built. A soccer stadium and entertainment district that has the capacity to support a MLS team, and a wonderful botanical garden. We already have an arena top 25 in concerts and love or hate UofL, the entertainment experience is just as good as the NBA with the suites, drinks, food, and bars. A rising immigrant population and one of the largest commercial real estate and hotel building booms in middle America.

Louisville's biggest defenders? Usually people from big cities like me who have lived all over and are defenders of the charm of the city. Until Louisville expats quit going aorund bashing the city because it doesn't have whatever sunbelt quality they are looking for in their new sunbelt town, it is going to be held back perception wise.

What is wrong with vacationing in Destin? As a beautiful beach and the closest to the city, it only makes sense. So do you put down people from Phoenix for beaching in S Cal? How about Richmond folks going to Va Beach? People are going to drive to the closest beautiful beach. I haven't a problem at all with the Louisville-Destin connection (and the 9 hour drive).

The high school thing is overplayed...it really is! Maybe because YOU didn't fit in or have too many friends in Louisville....doesn't make it a bad area. Louisville needs more evangelists around the country, sharing the news that it's a great place to live despite the mindset of a few expats who continually put it down. Maybe it isn't the best city, maybe it is not for everyone, but it really is a great and underrated city per capita. I think putting the city down justifies to many Louisville expats who left the city when it really wasn't much to write home about....that them leaving and staying gone is justified!

Last edited by Peter1948; 02-01-2019 at 10:09 PM..
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Old 02-02-2019, 09:42 AM
 
8,775 posts, read 4,130,908 times
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I don't know you from Adam and have no axe to grind but you are really coming off as a homer now. The OP asked for opinions, you gave yours, and no matter how many longwinded diatribes you give, yours is only one opinion. Repeating yours six times and shouting down others that differ doesn't make yours count for more. No need for you to rebut anyone else's opinion.

You seem to have overlooked my statement up front that I am not really speaking as to how it is today. Put me down as one of the "Louisville expats who left the city when it really wasn't much to write home about" as you put it. I don't need to justify anything. I just haven't seen since anything that made me want to move back. It will take more than a park or museum or stadium that I already enjoy a dozen of where I am.

The OP specifically asked if it was the kind of town where people ask what HS you attended and the fact is, as seen from multiple people here, it is. If so many people from Louisville who left have negative things to say (more "than any other place I have EVER seen") you might ask yourself why? You think God is in on a conspiracy against Louisville? You want to arbitrarily exclude much of the population (East end, J-town, Middletown). I doubt you'd like the views of the West end PRP crowd either. You want to cherry-pick a middle-class segment living in a gentrified urban neighborhood and project that as the typical Louisvillian.

When a city has to brag about parks and museums and soccer stadiums, that's telling. Don't forget the zoo, Louisvillians love to brag on their zoo. Nothing wrong with Destin, I just found it amusing that others mentioned it of all places, and it typifies how Louisvillians have a limited world experience and stick to the same tried-and-true.

I think someone said you are in real estate? Maybe it is you who has the skewed perspective. You probably meet a dozen people a month from all parts of the country looking to move here and think that is a typical experience when in reality you are meeting 20x as many outsiders as the average person. Because you are enamored with Louisville you try to sell it to someone who obviously won't be. Louisville may seem like the big leagues to people moving there from Bowling Green but the OP has spent most of her life in Dallas and Chicago. And she is not looking for a quaint small town experience but wanting urban life.

And once again, exceptions do not change the rule. We are talking about an overall atmosphere. Some could make lots of friends in the most hostile area and some would be loners in the friendliest zone. If the OP was the former she wouldn't be concerned enough to ask about it.
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