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Old 01-16-2009, 04:14 AM
 
Location: Dayton, OH
1,225 posts, read 3,878,053 times
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4th Street was on its last legs when we moved to Louisville, but there was still a bit of retail presence in the early 1970s.

There was a good local bookstore downtown as late as the early 1970s, Stuarts or Stewarts (not the department store), on the block of 4th that the Seelbach is on. I think it was close to or next door to the old Bycks store. They also had a branch at The Mall, but this was the larger store, but narrow. If i recall right, they had two floors being used for sales, but there were upper floors on the building. A good used bookstore (they had some higher quality architecture and art books) was in the Heyburn Building annex, e side of 4th, just south of Broadway, between Broadway and the Library, next door or just a few doors down from Yudofsky Furriers.

There was a cool contemporary/scandinavian furniture store on Guthrie Green, just off 4th. This same block had a Kentucky craft place called "Coffeetrees" (these where fairly high-quality crafts from places like the Berea workshops). Coffeetrees relocated to ground floor of the high rise across from Founders Square, NE corner of 5th and Muhammed Ali.

Back during the preppy craze Schupp and Snyder opened in the Starks Building, as the place to get all that expensive preppy-wear (like Rhodes but with a tad more style. I think they marketed to a younger crowd).

Then there was the downtown Blue Boar, which I recall was actually fairly big inside, with high ceilings and I vaguely recall these big staircases going up to a mezzanine level?. If I recall right it was not on 4th but on one of the cross streets.

Another restaurant on 4th, but from later in the 1970s and open only during business hours, was Pappa Tootsweet. This place was the first gyros place in Louisville, being a version of the 1970s-era gyro boom in Chicago (they brought the meat down from Chicago). This place is a parking lot or drive, being in the location between the Brown Hotel and the Ohio Theatre, e. side of 4th, or on that block.

I never been in it, but peaked through the window or door once: Jim Porters, south side of M-Ali between 4th and 5th. It looked like a local version of a 1960s rat-pack "lounge". They of course, relocated out to Lexington Road and Grinstead or thereabouts.

Downtown Stewarts Dept Store. Ground floor was great, with the high ceilings and corinthian columns. and wood display cases. The best part was the traditional downtown dept store candy shop, on the M-Ali side of the ground floor, more to the rear I think. They had a good candy selection, including good nonpareils.
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Old 01-16-2009, 04:29 PM
 
6,295 posts, read 13,176,543 times
Reputation: 2789
Quote:
Originally Posted by JefferyT View Post
4th Street was on its last legs when we moved to Louisville, but there was still a bit of retail presence in the early 1970s.

There was a good local bookstore downtown as late as the early 1970s, Stuarts or Stewarts (not the department store), on the block of 4th that the Seelbach is on. I think it was close to or next door to the old Bycks store. They also had a branch at The Mall, but this was the larger store, but narrow. If i recall right, they had two floors being used for sales, but there were upper floors on the building. A good used bookstore (they had some higher quality architecture and art books) was in the Heyburn Building annex, e side of 4th, just south of Broadway, between Broadway and the Library, next door or just a few doors down from Yudofsky Furriers.

There was a cool contemporary/scandinavian furniture store on Guthrie Green, just off 4th. This same block had a Kentucky craft place called "Coffeetrees" (these where fairly high-quality crafts from places like the Berea workshops). Coffeetrees relocated to ground floor of the high rise across from Founders Square, NE corner of 5th and Muhammed Ali.

Back during the preppy craze Schupp and Snyder opened in the Starks Building, as the place to get all that expensive preppy-wear (like Rhodes but with a tad more style. I think they marketed to a younger crowd).

Then there was the downtown Blue Boar, which I recall was actually fairly big inside, with high ceilings and I vaguely recall these big staircases going up to a mezzanine level?. If I recall right it was not on 4th but on one of the cross streets.

Another restaurant on 4th, but from later in the 1970s and open only during business hours, was Pappa Tootsweet. This place was the first gyros place in Louisville, being a version of the 1970s-era gyro boom in Chicago (they brought the meat down from Chicago). This place is a parking lot or drive, being in the location between the Brown Hotel and the Ohio Theatre, e. side of 4th, or on that block.

I never been in it, but peaked through the window or door once: Jim Porters, south side of M-Ali between 4th and 5th. It looked like a local version of a 1960s rat-pack "lounge". They of course, relocated out to Lexington Road and Grinstead or thereabouts.

Downtown Stewarts Dept Store. Ground floor was great, with the high ceilings and corinthian columns. and wood display cases. The best part was the traditional downtown dept store candy shop, on the M-Ali side of the ground floor, more to the rear I think. They had a good candy selection, including good nonpareils.
So, even in the declining urban era of the 1970s there was a large amount of downtown retail. I am thinking it will take one big development, ala center city, to bring it back. right now the biggest qualms i have with downtown are the lack of clothing retail, and the large surface lots. in recent years, several surface lots have seen large developments, and there are more occuring now like Zirmed towers, UL reserach building and garage, the garage on jefferson at first going up, the new JCC buildings etc.
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Old 01-28-2009, 08:39 PM
 
17 posts, read 94,860 times
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I am also from Valley Station, and I really miss Arthur's Ice Cream that resided on the corner of Stonestreet and VS Road (near Meltons). It was a little expensive for me at 14, but it was a great place for dessert after chowing down hamburgers at Druthers.
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Old 01-29-2009, 05:50 PM
 
Location: Dayton, OH
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I remember Arthurs...it was in a converted gas station. You must have been from the Prairie Village area, or thereabouts?
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Old 02-07-2009, 12:20 PM
 
Location: Schnitzleburg/Germantown
3 posts, read 46,773 times
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Default Not going back too far

GES on Crittenden Drive across from IH. Raked leaves for two days with my friend Mark to buy the Beatles White Album. Mark bought his girlfriend a "sweetheart" ring from O G Wilson.
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Old 02-07-2009, 12:56 PM
 
Location: Schnitzleburg/Germantown
3 posts, read 46,773 times
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Default 1968 Trends

Going to Stewart's to buy Adler socks and Rooster ties. Levy's for Weejun's/Sportoccasins and Sutcliff's for Chuck Taylor's. Friday night dinner at Hasenhour's (had to wait in the bar with mom & dad).
Going with dad to Martin's at 4th & Broadway to buy a new suit, and then to Dizzy Whiz for a hamburger. Onion rings were great.
Going to Monarch Lincoln Murcury on Broadway to pick up the new car. Wow, what a great smell. AM/FM radio! Iroquois High Had just changed from Gottchalk Junior High, and I'd be going there instead of DuPont Manual.
The bus rides to Fourth Street on Saturday to see a movie or two. I forget, was it $1.50 for the matinee? I'd stop by Durlauf's to pick up WKLO's and WAKY's top twenty list, and maybe buy a 45.
I'd be driving in the next year, and I'd stop in Cal Connell's Cadillac at 4th & Broadway to see what kind of used cars they had. Lord, looking back they had a 1967 Oldsmobile 442 convertible for $1,950. I have dreams about that car to this day.
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Old 02-07-2009, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Schnitzleburg/Germantown
3 posts, read 46,773 times
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It was W K Stewart's Book Store on 4th, and owned by a relative of Kurt Vonnegut from Indianapolis. They wouldn't sell any of Mr. Vonnegut's books because they contained curse words. They did have all of Ian Flemings' James Bond books however. Halleluja!
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Old 02-10-2009, 05:24 PM
 
3 posts, read 39,392 times
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I do have a picture of Westland Mall, taken from the Dixie, but it's currently in storage in Los Angeles and won't have access until the end of 2009.
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Old 02-10-2009, 05:53 PM
 
3 posts, read 39,392 times
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In the late 50s and early 60s my family lived on Stephan Drive, bordering the former Westland Mall site. At that time, the businesses at Stephan included a beer depot, the first MacDonald's in Louisville (with the elaborate neon sign) and Eden Lanes Bowling Alley, which I believe only had about 12 lanes. The Westland Mall site was an empty field. About 1958, my parents signed a petition to prevent a drive-in theatre from being built there, much to my disappointment. The drive-in was built, but at the very southwest tip of Jefferson County, which operated for about twenty years. It always charged by the carload. It made the news in the early 70s when a woman working at the box office was kidnapped, murdered and buried in a shallow grave in Otter Creek Park.

Years later, there was indeed a failed subdivision, but it was not torn down per se, the houses were all moved to different locations. There were only about seven or eight houses built. About three were built near Dixie Highway, and the rest were on the southwest edge of the property in the back. There were several streets that were paved, good for practicing for one's driver's license as there was obviously no traffic.

As someone else mentioned, Consolidated was built first as a department store/grocery store combination with a common entrance. Later, the grocery store division was sold to another chain. This grocery store hosted a primitive ATM in which the clerk had to give you the money by hand. A developer named John W. Waits built Westland Mall with plenty of advanced publicity. Something went awry, however, because the mall had difficulty getting off the ground right from the start. It sat for about two years in an incomplete state with birds nesting in the open rafters. When it was finally finished, it looked to me as if someone had lost the plans. That it was a low end shopping mall was one thing, but the transition to Consolidated was nonsensical -- it gradually diminished to a narrow trapezoid only wide enough for a side exit to the parking lot and the double glass interior doors to Consolidated (on the grocery store side). This never made any sense because the mall itself was built well away from the houses behind it.

By the time Grant City was built (which is now a Target), the WT Grant Company was only about a year or so from declaring bankruptcy. The old Grant store on Dixie Highway was in a shopping center directly across the street from Valley High School, which also included a Kroger's.

The Westland 4 Theatres were open for several years and were at least somewhat less awkwardly styled than the Alpha 1 Cinemas, built in the K-Mart Shopping Center (which was in turn built on the site of the old Dixie Drive-In. Some residents in Oak Hills could easily look down and view the movies shown there.

There was a twin of Westland on Bardstown Road, as someone else mentioned but initially it was called Raceland Mall.

Westland Mall simply never had the capital to impress, with its bare cement floors, drop ceilings and stores like a Mom and Pop head shop. At the time, the owners of Dixie Manor must have felt very smug. Though it was already in decline, comparitively speaking, it was still far superior.

And speaking of Dixie Manor, I remember when it was the largest and most popular suburban shopping center in Louisville. The parking lot would be routinely filled. What is now the Dixie Dozen was an upscale department store, Kaufmann-Strauss, and Ben Snyder's. There was a Shakleton's music store, A G C Murphy, Kresque's, two grocery stores (for most of its time frame, a Winn-Dixie and A & P). The Winn-Dixie had an underground conveyer so you could pick up your groceries in the parking lot without having to take them to your car. There was a Vine (or perhaps Variety) Record Store, a great hobby store (Fisher's Hobbies), several clothing stores, shoe stores, a Western Auto and a Kay's Jeweler's. It was allowed to decline, unfortunately, and though it could have been remodeled into a mall, everyone believed that retail shopping had permanently moved to the East End.
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Old 02-10-2009, 06:16 PM
 
Location: Kentucky
6,749 posts, read 19,553,882 times
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Scottoro that was a very informative post, thank you!
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