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Old 12-11-2008, 08:12 PM
 
Location: Louisville KY Metro area
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The serious problem of this matter is that no matter how safe Louisville might be compared to other cities like or unlike it, there are too many needless deaths and the number per year is growing. That is serious and no rational of comparison will do.

 
Old 12-12-2008, 01:50 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tomocox View Post
The serious problem of this matter is that no matter how safe Louisville might be compared to other cities like or unlike it, there are too many needless deaths and the number per year is growing. That is serious and no rational of comparison will do.
Tom, certainly like you, I mourn the loss of innocent life. No life should ever be taken by another human. Still guns and crime are a reality of the US today. For US cities, Louisville is very safe. For the US to be as safe as the rest of the world in its cities, we have to enact tougher gun and drug laws and change our culture.
 
Old 12-12-2008, 01:52 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by censusdata View Post
I was looking at a murder map of Houston - West Louisville is probably safer than the "good" side of Houston, where ever that is

Houston Crime Map
And Houston is not even among the most dangerous cities. I keep telling Kentuckians that they think Louisville is "dangerous" because they havent lived in any big city. Louisville is very very safe compared to any of the cities in the top 50 or even top 100 in population.
 
Old 12-12-2008, 06:43 PM
 
Location: Louisville KY Metro area
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stx12499 View Post
Tom, certainly like you, I mourn the loss of innocent life. No life should ever be taken by another human. Still guns and crime are a reality of the US today. For US cities, Louisville is very safe. For the US to be as safe as the rest of the world in its cities, we have to enact tougher gun and drug laws and change our culture.
STX, its not gun laws, its gun users. I assure you that if there had been just one gun per plane on 9/11 there wouldn't be 3000 dead. Once again liberal thinking (I am not pointing at you) is a fallacy. Bumblebee's can't fly according to aero-engineering, but somehow their sting hurts badly. I just can't imagine how they got to the top of my head so fast.

The death penalty must be formidable, or why would so many thugs use it.
 
Old 12-12-2008, 08:01 PM
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stx12499 View Post
And Houston is not even among the most dangerous cities. I keep telling Kentuckians that they think Louisville is "dangerous" because they havent lived in any big city. Louisville is very very safe compared to any of the cities in the top 50 or even top 100 in population.
It's not just less murders, it's that Houston doesn't seem to have an area that is free of violent crime while the entire area of Louisville east of Bardstown Rd (an area w/ a population of 300,000) has maybe 6 murders a year, and none north of I-64

As for the death penalty, I agree w/ TC that the current method doesn't work. Criminals either need to be executed w/i a couple of years of the verdict (as is usually done at the federal level). Executing someone 30 yrs after the crime does little to detere crime and does a lot to bring back painful memories for the victims family.

We either need to abolish the death penalty and sentance capitol offenders to hard labor (maybe in coal mines) or execute quickly and publically
 
Old 12-12-2008, 08:12 PM
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stx12499 View Post
Tom, certainly like you, I mourn the loss of innocent life. No life should ever be taken by another human. Still guns and crime are a reality of the US today. For US cities, Louisville is very safe. For the US to be as safe as the rest of the world in its cities, we have to enact tougher gun and drug laws and change our culture.
Drugs are really at the heart of the issue. People who use hard drugs for years fry their brain and become truely incapible of making sound moral decsions - at that point they are lost to society and are either institutionalized or left on the streets to commit crime.

Money from selling drugs funds things hard to image - maybe some of those countries who want to legalize drugs should read about...

* 9 teenagers bound and beheaded in Tijuana, Mexico
Reuters AlertNet - Security chief quits in violent Mexican border city

* 13 teenagers bound and shot execution style in Monterrey, Mexico
by drug lords. Bodies of 13 teenagers found near Monterrey

* A five year old boy murderd by being put in a barrel of acid
Bloomberg.com: Latin America
 
Old 12-12-2008, 08:24 PM
 
Location: Northern VA (for now)
23,062 posts, read 32,088,530 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by censusdata View Post
It's not just less murders, it's that Houston doesn't seem to have an area that is free of violent crime while the entire area of Louisville east of Bardstown Rd (an area w/ a population of 300,000) has maybe 6 murders a year, and none north of I-64

As for the death penalty, I agree w/ TC that the current method doesn't work. Criminals either need to be executed w/i a couple of years of the verdict (as is usually done at the federal level). Executing someone 30 yrs after the crime does little to detere crime and does a lot to bring back painful memories for the victims family.

We either need to abolish the death penalty and sentance capitol offenders to hard labor (maybe in coal mines) or execute quickly and publically
I defintely agree with you. Virginia has one of the shortest death penalty waits in the US and we still have not executed John Allen Muhammad (DC Sniper.) I have mixed feelings on the death penalty but one thing that most Americans will agree on is that it takes too long to execute someone.
 
Old 12-12-2008, 09:15 PM
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tomocox View Post
Wagy, I believe that before the sons and daughters of slavery can get to truly equal socio-economic status several things must change. I hope they can because no one needs to be considered anything but equal in today's America. I beg your tolerance as I am doing everything I can to be genuinely caring, and in no way condemning or inappropriately discriminatory. I just think so many lives are at stake and the 50 years since Little Rock has not truly improved the overall educational status of Black or Hispanics, yet the Asians seem to have advanced and what hatred there was of that group even in the 1950's and 60's.

1st: The term African-American must go. Every hyphenated-American must go. To use such a term automatically segregates and therefore makes discrimination easier. The only time race should be used is in the Dr's office and then only as a diagnostic tool.

2nd: Slavery is history. Yes, Africans were wrongly imported and owned and the suffering that went with it was terrible, but then so too was the suffering my ancestors endured as they braved the frontiers to come to America and the many frontiers America itself offered. Yes, they were free to make the choices while most African descendants were not free to make such choices. I honor both groups sufferings.

3rd: Barack Obama is not the son of a slave by any manner, yet the sale job was that he equaled those whose ancestors had been. Obama is not "one of us" should have been recognized. This fact has absolutely nothing to do with whether he will be a good president or not. I only point out how political spin can make what is false or untrue seem real. All American's of every color, race, creed, etc, should have voted for the best presidential candidate, not the one whose demographical statistics most closely match theirs.

4th: Because of # 3, our educational system must revise its socialistic attitudes which fail to allow all people to achieve or fail at their own accord and not at the fault of others.
While it is true the the barriers for racial equality mentioned are gone, that does NOT mean that there is still no such thing as White Priviledge.

As a middle class White guy, I have never had anyone around me tell me that I'm "not like the rest of them" - I'd say that probably every middle class Black person has had a White person at some point tell them they're "not typical" or "I wish all of THEM could be like YOU". As a White guy I am never held accountable for low income, problem areas that are majority white (like Eastern KY, Fairdale, etc) even though those areas are no more my fault than they (a middle class suburban Black person) would be of a high crime Black area in the inner city.
 
Old 12-12-2008, 11:35 PM
 
6,312 posts, read 13,229,731 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tomocox View Post
STX, its not gun laws, its gun users. I assure you that if there had been just one gun per plane on 9/11 there wouldn't be 3000 dead. Once again liberal thinking (I am not pointing at you) is a fallacy. Bumblebee's can't fly according to aero-engineering, but somehow their sting hurts badly. I just can't imagine how they got to the top of my head so fast.

The death penalty must be formidable, or why would so many thugs use it.
It think its a mix of gun laws and users,and thats why I stated we need to change our culture. We largely live in a violent culture.
 
Old 12-13-2008, 06:36 AM
 
Location: Louisville KY Metro area
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I know this isn't a political thread, but in speaking directly to Louisville issues, crime is the most damaging single issue to the value of homes. Censusdata points to white privilege. I agree that there may be white privilege, but the cause is simply such an overwhelming crime rate amongst minorities. Then when crime does happen, the "Community Organizers" jump into the media fray to defend the obvious guilty rather than to teach how stupid gets what stupid deserves. For fear of mixing names, I speak specifically of the death by cop where the idiot sat in an SUV hung up on a post attempting to run over cops attempting to arrest him. The late Louis Coleman ran to the defense of the perp rather than defending the black cops involved. I suggest that any white privilege is actually black caused not white assumed.

Before there can be economic recovery in Newburg, Smoketown, Old Louisville, or the greater west end, as STX says, there must be a complete change in attitudes.

As a Realtor, look at the simple number of homes that could be sold for even greater value if the cancer that is spreading down Dixie Hwy could be stopped and then reversed to clean the terrible crime zones.
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