U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Kentucky > Louisville area
 [Register]
Louisville area Jefferson County
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
 
 
Old 03-16-2009, 04:11 PM
 
17 posts, read 38,097 times
Reputation: 10

Advertisements

I thought that anyone interested might like to know what I found out when I called JCPS today. Here were my questions and the answers:

1) If a child gets into his resides school in kindergarten, does he have a guaranteed spot in that school from then until the end of elementary?
Answer: Each child gets a chance between kindergarten and first grade to choose another school within the cluster and PROVIDED THAT the first grade in the resides school is not beyond capacity, he can stay in that school. Once you have a spot in 1st grade, you stay at that school until the end of elementary.

2) What happens with the child's siblings when they begin school? Do they get priority in the same school?
Answer: Siblings are kept together in the same school.

3) If you don't make it into your resides school (or school of your choice), are you put on a waiting list?
Answer: No. There are too many kids in the clusters to keep up with waiting lists.

The one thing I forgot to ask or wasn't sure about based on the answers given was whether you could reapply other years for other schools. It seemed that once you are in first grade, you can not change schools.

The phone number for Parent Assistance (to answer questions about the confusing system!) is 502-485-6250. Hope this helps anyone else who needs some info!
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-17-2009, 06:56 AM
 
3,843 posts, read 8,246,585 times
Reputation: 1139
Quote:
Originally Posted by CoMoMom View Post
I thought that anyone interested might like to know what I found out when I called JCPS today. Here were my questions and the answers:

1) If a child gets into his resides school in kindergarten, does he have a guaranteed spot in that school from then until the end of elementary?
Answer: Each child gets a chance between kindergarten and first grade to choose another school within the cluster and PROVIDED THAT the first grade in the resides school is not beyond capacity, he can stay in that school. Once you have a spot in 1st grade, you stay at that school until the end of elementary.

2) What happens with the child's siblings when they begin school? Do they get priority in the same school?
Answer: Siblings are kept together in the same school.

3) If you don't make it into your resides school (or school of your choice), are you put on a waiting list?
Answer: No. There are too many kids in the clusters to keep up with waiting lists.

The one thing I forgot to ask or wasn't sure about based on the answers given was whether you could reapply other years for other schools. It seemed that once you are in first grade, you can not change schools.

The phone number for Parent Assistance (to answer questions about the confusing system!) is 502-485-6250. Hope this helps anyone else who needs some info!

EXCELLENT information! I thank you so much for providing good, factual information that many posters can utilize to make up their OWN mind whether or not JCPS is for them, without coming in with preconceieved stereotypes of large city school districts.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-26-2009, 05:22 PM
 
16 posts, read 34,217 times
Reputation: 26
My family moved from Cincinnati to Louisville a little over 2 1/2 yrs. ago. My daughter was 3 at the time so figuring out the schools was my main job. It's a mess. I volunteered for the Every1Reads program to see the schools firsthand (and found out 'my' kids were sitting on a bus an average of 45 min. each way). I went to every open house in our cluster. I went to the big showcase of schools downtown. I went on private school visits. It got to the point where I could recognize a couple of the principals from the "better" elementary schools in our cluster on the street. What I discovered was that you can ask the exact same question, using the exact same words, and get a different answer. Principals didn't give the same answer. The people at JCPS didn't give the same answer. Harassing poor parents at the playground didn't get the same answers. Ridiculous. Plus, you have to sign up for your default resides school and if you don't you won't even get in there necessarily. Also, at least at the time we were looking, the then-new superintendent was making noise about pulling out some of the 2010 first graders (which would be my daughter's class) and moving/busing them around based on the parents education/income etc. Not sure if that's still the case because we bailed on the public school system & put our daughter in parochial. She'll be in with the same group of kids through the junior high years. So, while, technically, the cost of living in Louisville may be cheaper than Cincinnati, having to pay tuition to a parochial/private school when we left an amazing neighborhood public school in Ohio erased any monetary advantage. And it's not like you can help people pick out a good neighborhood or place to live because getting into a good school is a complete crapshoot.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-26-2009, 08:55 PM
 
Location: Louisville KY Metro area
4,809 posts, read 8,255,830 times
Reputation: 1958
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elaine S. View Post
My family moved from Cincinnati to Louisville a little over 2 1/2 yrs. ago. My daughter was 3 at the time so figuring out the schools was my main job. It's a mess. I volunteered for the Every1Reads program to see the schools firsthand (and found out 'my' kids were sitting on a bus an average of 45 min. each way). I went to every open house in our cluster. I went to the big showcase of schools downtown. I went on private school visits. It got to the point where I could recognize a couple of the principals from the "better" elementary schools in our cluster on the street. What I discovered was that you can ask the exact same question, using the exact same words, and get a different answer. Principals didn't give the same answer. The people at JCPS didn't give the same answer. Harassing poor parents at the playground didn't get the same answers. Ridiculous. Plus, you have to sign up for your default resides school and if you don't you won't even get in there necessarily. Also, at least at the time we were looking, the then-new superintendent was making noise about pulling out some of the 2010 first graders (which would be my daughter's class) and moving/busing them around based on the parents education/income etc. Not sure if that's still the case because we bailed on the public school system & put our daughter in parochial. She'll be in with the same group of kids through the junior high years. So, while, technically, the cost of living in Louisville may be cheaper than Cincinnati, having to pay tuition to a parochial/private school when we left an amazing neighborhood public school in Ohio erased any monetary advantage. And it's not like you can help people pick out a good neighborhood or place to live because getting into a good school is a complete crapshoot.
Thank you for saying so eloquently in less that 200 words what I have been screaming for years!
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-27-2009, 06:31 PM
Status: "I hate the holidays." (set 3 days ago)
 
Location: Arlington, Virginia
15,219 posts, read 17,920,023 times
Reputation: 15970
I may probably have no personal stake (or business) in this thing but it sounds like Louisville is trying to a good thing the wrong way. As someone who has lived in cities with underacheiving public schools for a lifetime (Sumter, SC; Norfolk, Hampton, and Alexandria, VA) I understand parents who are poor wanting a good education for their kids. I've also been a beneficiary of a mom who worked 60 hour/6 day weeks to buy a house in a great school district so i had a better chance. Why should i suffer for the sake of a "diverse" school? I went to a "diverse" school for my last two years and while i got a good education out of that, the "diversity" kind of brought the overall school's performance down. This was more economic diversity than racial diversity. I went with kids from the projects and kids from the million dollar homes in Alexandria. This caused conflicts and fights but mainly it was the project kids who caused a lot of the trouble. If i ever have kids i'll do all i can to keep them out of schools with overall dead-end attitudes.

This is my frustration with Louisville. Why should anyone invest their hard earned money into Louisville real estate if they can't guarantee a good school or even a certain set of schools? Good luck selling Louisville homes to BRACcies. Meade or Hardin County schools may not be special but at least in those counties they'll know what's up with their schools from the get-go. Heck half of Louisville schools could easily kick Radcliff's butt but some schools in the 'Ville will make Radcliff schools look good.

I say, if Louisville ever wants to reach its full potential (trust me it has some) go back to neighborhood schools. Good neighborhood, good school, bad neighborhood (you know).
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-01-2009, 09:11 PM
 
10 posts, read 20,691 times
Reputation: 13
Alanboy is right.

Sumter schools = a F****** joke!
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-13-2009, 10:07 AM
 
16 posts, read 34,217 times
Reputation: 26
Quote:
Thank you for saying so eloquently in less that 200 words what I have been screaming for years!
Thanks, Tomocox. The school situation is what initially soured me on Louisville when we moved here. Our real estate agent, a 'relocation expert,' was pretty great with some things but was childless and didn't really know the system up close and personal. She believed what JCPS told her. She left us with the impression that parents could pick out and apply to any school in their cluster. While technically true, there's probably less than a snowball's chance of getting into one of the better schools unless it's your resides school. And even then some of the better ones have too many kids applying (and tons of sibs who get first dibs) so many of the kids who should get to go there, can't. It's frustrating that even when you think you've made the best choice in location, so many things can keep you from getting into your resides--a lot of sibs the year your child is to start, a high enrollment of new families, JCPS restructuring districts and and tinkering with cluster/school 'requirements'--things that parents have absolutely no control over. There's something telling--and sad--that of the five little neighborhood girls my daughter plays with only two go to the same school (and all live within two streets of us). My daughter loves her school and we love the school community. I feel better about Louisville overall but I wonder if we would feel as good if we didn't have the means to pay for our child's education. Good luck to all the transplanted families and make sure the cost of living difference allows you to have $5,000-$10,000 every year to put towards your child's education, if necessary. Maybe you'll be one of the lucky ones and get into the public school you really want but maybe you won't. Pick your real estate agents carefully--clusters mean nothing--you need to know which resides school a house goes with and then get get firm, concrete details on that school (assuming it's the one you want). Is the school already over capacity? How many students who should have gotten in last year actually got sent to another school? How many sibs are coming in? What's the latest "brilliant" plan by JCPS? Find out how many openings there are in your grade. Do this before you buy. If there is another good school in your cluster, ask the same questions and look for houses that have it as a resides. Be willing to look at houses in other clusters and do the same. Again, good luck.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-13-2009, 10:56 AM
 
Location: Louisville KY Metro area
4,809 posts, read 8,255,830 times
Reputation: 1958
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elaine S. View Post
Thanks, Tomocox. The school situation is what initially soured me on Louisville when we moved here. Our real estate agent, a 'relocation expert,' was pretty great with some things but was childless and didn't really know the system up close and personal. She believed what JCPS told her. She left us with the impression that parents could pick out and apply to any school in their cluster. While technically true, there's probably less than a snowball's chance of getting into one of the better schools unless it's your resides school. And even then some of the better ones have too many kids applying (and tons of sibs who get first dibs) so many of the kids who should get to go there, can't. It's frustrating that even when you think you've made the best choice in location, so many things can keep you from getting into your resides--a lot of sibs the year your child is to start, a high enrollment of new families, JCPS restructuring districts and and tinkering with cluster/school 'requirements'--things that parents have absolutely no control over. There's something telling--and sad--that of the five little neighborhood girls my daughter plays with only two go to the same school (and all live within two streets of us). My daughter loves her school and we love the school community. I feel better about Louisville overall but I wonder if we would feel as good if we didn't have the means to pay for our child's education. Good luck to all the transplanted families and make sure the cost of living difference allows you to have $5,000-$10,000 every year to put towards your child's education, if necessary. Maybe you'll be one of the lucky ones and get into the public school you really want but maybe you won't. Pick your real estate agents carefully--clusters mean nothing--you need to know which resides school a house goes with and then get get firm, concrete details on that school (assuming it's the one you want). Is the school already over capacity? How many students who should have gotten in last year actually got sent to another school? How many sibs are coming in? What's the latest "brilliant" plan by JCPS? Find out how many openings there are in your grade. Do this before you buy. If there is another good school in your cluster, ask the same questions and look for houses that have it as a resides. Be willing to look at houses in other clusters and do the same. Again, good luck.
The $ 5000-10000 number is per child unless you are Catholic and then you must tithe (they'll audit your tax return). Not to put down faith based religion in any way, just the facts that some non-Catholics need to know. For the difference of just the four years of high school, $ 30,000 splitting the difference, I can buy a lot of gas and have my child in a very high quality high school and own an Oldham County home to boot.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-13-2009, 03:39 PM
 
17 posts, read 38,097 times
Reputation: 10
We are very strongly considering living in Oldham, but the only thing is that yes, the high schools are great, but the elementary schools seem to be pretty hit and miss...the only for-sure great places to live for elementary is Goshen (which we didn't love), Buckner (we LOVE but pretty pricey!), and certain parts of Crestwood...
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-13-2009, 04:00 PM
 
Location: Louisville KY Metro area
4,809 posts, read 8,255,830 times
Reputation: 1958
Quote:
Originally Posted by CoMoMom View Post
We are very strongly considering living in Oldham, but the only thing is that yes, the high schools are great, but the elementary schools seem to be pretty hit and miss...the only for-sure great places to live for elementary is Goshen (which we didn't love), Buckner (we LOVE but pretty pricey!), and certain parts of Crestwood...
I don't know where your information has come from regarding the elementary schools. Liberty for years was considered the number 1 school in Kentucky. With the exception of LaGrange, there isn't a nickels difference in the rest of the county's schools. Yes, Hillcrest has replaced Liberty as # 1, but that is in part due to the facilities and the demographics of its district.

One thing you'll dislike about Oldham County Schools, it's very hard to attend a non-district school, but then why transport a child clear across the county since the schools are so equal.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2011 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Kentucky > Louisville area

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top