U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Happy Easter!
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Kentucky > Louisville area
 [Register]
Louisville area Jefferson County
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-08-2010, 09:37 AM
 
Location: The Great State of Texas, Finally!
5,321 posts, read 10,584,932 times
Reputation: 2395

Advertisements

As a Chicago native, and someone who has been to all your suggested areas I would rank Chatanooga on the bottom. It is lovely, beautiful, etc, but you may not fit in if you are a progressive liberal. Austin would be ideal if you could deal with the hot summers and the traffic. It is NOT a big city access with small town charm, but you can find alot of things that fit your life style and housing needs, although your property taxes will be high. Second to that, and my personal preference, would be Louisville. What I love about Louisville is that it's sort of a cross between the Midwest and the South. Lots of brick homes, craftmans, shotguns, etc. The thing that might frustrate you about Austin, and most areas of Texas, is the sprawl. They have alot of land, so there is no real reason to utilize it our build up instead of out. So if you're looking for the sort of unique neighborhood set up, walkability, density, etc that you'd find in Chicago, Louisville most resembles that. You can still find some of that in Austin, but not so much as you would in Louisville. As for Lexington, I was frustrated driving there. Downtown is nice, but the rest, again, seems sprawlish and less dense than Louisville. Have you thought about Ashville, NC or Bloomington, Indiana? Both are progressive towns that have more of that small town charm, with lots of arts, cultural activities, festivals, etc. Your winters in Bloomington wouldn't be as harsh as those in Chicago.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-07-2010, 11:53 AM
 
4 posts, read 4,880 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by tal1412 View Post
Thanks for all of the comments. I do think that the weather in Louisville is MUCH warmer than what we experience in Chicago. The fact that Louisville is known as a progressive city is why we are looking at it as a possible new home home. We definitely will be there to check it out.
Keept the comments coming. We appreciate the feedback!
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<
I worked in Louisville KY from 1997-2004 ...there's four things the people
looking for your $$$ aren't gonna tell you.

1) Do you have allergies ?
This may NOT be the place for you, Louisville KY is located on the edge of the Ohio Valley ... supposed to be one of
the worse places in the nation for rag weed. I didn't just hear this, I lived
there for 7 years, I once asked my doctor if he had many patients for
allergy troubles, he said its easily 80% of his patients.

2) Coal burning power plants cause LOTS of air pollution.
Untill recently, Louisville and Floyd and Clark counties in Southern Indiana
had mandatory emissions testing on your vehicles. How do you feel about
air that you can SEE ? The first time there's an "OZONE ACTION DAY"
you'll be in for a BIG surprise. I remember seeing the air so bad down on
Dixie Highway near the main power plant, that it looked like fog.

3) The Ohio river rises a LOT, don't get tempted to buy real estate
near the river.

4) Louisville KY is not a deep south town, its friendly but nothing like
Tennessee or Alabama
---------------------------------------------------------------------
The good news: <<<<<<<<<
The people of Louisville KY are some of the nicest people you'll ever meet.
You may notice how few of people talk with a southern accent, you gotta
drive maybe 10 miles outside of Louisville ...then you'll hear it
They call Louisville "The southern most nothern city and the northern most
southern city" You'll also get tired of hearing "Kentucky-Anna" the
marketing people love that phrase...lol.

++>> If my father was still alive, I'd still be working in Louisville KY, I really
REALLY miss the friendly people there. Even with the occasional terrible
air quality during stagnant air conditions ....I'd still move back. The
people of Louisville AND my employer treated me like family.

The far east side of Louisville has the nicest homes ......
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-11-2010, 09:50 PM
 
77 posts, read 173,190 times
Reputation: 70
I went to high school in the East end of Louisville for just one semester in 1989. And i have since lived or even just visited most parts of the country. And Louisville is a place i'll never forget.

Try spending some time there. I think that you'll either love it or hate it. It really is a close knit and friendly town. Too many places in America no longer have that. And it is a decent sized town so that there is enough to do, but small enough not to lose its friendliness. I've lived in Indianapolis. The place is unbelievably boring. Yes, it's clean. Yes its slightly better than Louisville. But Louisville and KY beat it in spades for character. And i currently live on the east coast. Good luck.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2010, 04:16 PM
 
8 posts, read 9,552 times
Reputation: 10
consensus of opinion, basically you might find something here, however, I'm concerned about your thoughts about weather, well, they are a bit right there, while, I love my home city, infact am a 58 year old college student, I would say that to get a better climate, Nashville might be your best bet. The city is a bit more diverse than some of the other respondents would think, however, you do have to explore to find exactly what you're looking for, I prefer the Cherokee Triangle area near Cherokee park, it's al older and weathered area, but depending on your tastes, renovation might be an option, of course, but we can't really fault that Tennessee would be a bit warmer.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2010, 08:51 PM
 
8 posts, read 9,552 times
Reputation: 10
Oh gee, Princess there's a reason why a lotof Kentuckians come back. It's not because we're backwards baby, it's because we're tired of pompous snobs who decide how everyone else should live. I don't have to have every penny in the world, and I'm not poor by any means. I see beyond my own nose and my own greed, to the needs of other people, there's a difference between backwards and being a human being. Sounds like you should be going back to CALI and leaving the bluegrass to its peace. (And by the way I am not a barefoot hillbilly, but a college educated 58 year old who is more than happy to list my residence as Louisville, Kentucky!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-21-2010, 10:40 AM
 
Location: Mt. Washington, KY
171 posts, read 323,541 times
Reputation: 43
Places I've lived: Louisville, KY, St. Pete Fl., Ny city, Ft. Lauderdale Fl., Evansville, IN, also spent 5 months in London, England. I've traveled the U.S. extensively. Louisville is a fine place and has terrific restaurants and layers of culture from 'club rat' to 'river rat'.

I'm sorry you didn't appreciate it here and I think it's wonderful you moved on. Louisville is a fine city but not everyone's shangri la.

Besides Chicago, other decisively liberal cities, and where you might feel more at home, are: Detroit, Gary In., NYC, Oakland Ca., Cleveland, OH, San Fransisco., Philadelphia, Birmingham Al.,

Keep us posted.

BTW, you never said where you lived in the bluegrass state. I'm curious too.

And I take issue with you're "realistic" thinking. It's not realistic as it isn't planted in facts or statistics. It's your 'subjective' thinking. I understand you didn't like it here but your portrayal isn't factual. You should make that more clear when you are writing. It's an obligation of educated and 'enlighted' person like yourself to clarify fact from opinion. Opine all you want but don't try to pass it off as fact.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-24-2010, 02:33 PM
 
Location: Mt. Washington, KY
171 posts, read 323,541 times
Reputation: 43
Quote:
3) The Ohio river rises a LOT, don't get tempted to buy real estate
near the river.
Actually, you can have a nice river lot that doesn't flood for around $400,000. Let me know if anyone is interested.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-25-2010, 11:01 AM
 
2 posts, read 3,130 times
Reputation: 11
My wife and I moved here from Chicago about three years ago. We moved to the southwest end (Shively south of 264) and while we love our house, the area is loud with traffic. If we had to do it again, I think we would've scoped out our neighborhood around rush hour, or on a night when Texas Roadhouse was having bike (motorcycle) night. We would've gotten a better idea of our surroundings.

That said, I like Louisville a lot. Nice places to eat, not hard to get out of town like Chicago (takes an hour just to escape the city up there). I love music and there is plenty of that happening here. I've met some wonderful, caring, intelligent people since I've moved here. Beautiful parks. I do miss the lake. Here there is a waterfront park, but the riverfront is largely industrial. Also, outside of the east end area, it's all pretty stip-mall/chain restaurant infested. Fourth Street Live is downtown, but that's not my bag at all. Touristy convention center land.

It takes some work making friends, at least it has for us - that's probably the way it is in many places. We have made a few friends through our jobs, but I think it's just more of a trick to make close friends as you get older (we're in our late-thirties/early-forties). We still feel somewhat alienated here, though. We both had dozens of great friends in Chicago and after three years here, it's been hard connecting with folks in this town.

Coming from Chicago, we kind of thought it would be a lot more mellow in Louisville and it is a bit. You can get across town in 20 minutes or so. But there are definitely traffic jams and unlike Chicago, which is a grid (road-wise), Louisville has very winding roads. It takes a little while to figure them out. Sidenote: I've found that merging on the highway here takes some getting used to. I can't explain it really, but when I try to let someone in my lane, it seems like they just slow down along next to me and don't understand I'm trying to let them in. On the other hand, when trying to switch lanes, it seems harder to catch a break and get in your desired lane. Maybe I'm nuts, I don't know, but I sure don't see people using turn signals that much around here, so that can complicate driving a bit. Public transportation is not nearly as extensive as Chicago's. You can spend hours just trying to go a few miles by bus. We had to get 2 cars because our jobs are in different locations. The cost of living down here is a little cheaper (gas/housing), but that savings sort of got voided out by our car payments.

I thought since I had experienced extreme weather in Chicago, that Louisville would be a bit easier to deal with. You do get a beautiful spring and fall here, the winter is shorter, but the summers are really hot. We wait for the sun to start going down before mowing the lawn sometimes (or get up super early). Since we've moved here there has been: 1) a windstorm from hurricane Ike that knocked out our power for 10 days, 2) a major ice storm that knocked out our power again for 4 days. Both were a huge mess to clean up, tree branches all over, smashed gutters, cracked windshield on our car. So while the weather may not get as bone chillingly cold as it does in Chicago, there are some serious storms that blow through this town. There was also a big flash flood last August, water levels almost made it up to our house, but we lucked out and didn't get flooded. Many other people lost a lot, though. Crazy weather. Find out about flooding in your area if you're checking out a possible home to buy.

If you want a more liberal part of town, I'd say Crescent Hill/Highlands/St. Matthews all might be nice. Where we live, I don't think the Obama sign in our front yard went over too well. Most of our neighbors just ignore us/give us the fish eye. Our next door neighbor is great, but of course she's putting her house up for sale. I think our part of town is just more conservative.

Last edited by chicago-->shively; 06-25-2010 at 11:38 AM.. Reason: grammar
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-01-2010, 01:47 PM
 
Location: Mt. Washington, KY
171 posts, read 323,541 times
Reputation: 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by PrincessJoyce View Post
Ignorance is bliss in Kentucy. Come out of the dark ages. The entire state is backwards. Young people become educated and leave. Kentucky loses residents everyday. Take a real look around you. Your state could use alot of improvement. Just like the icon you people need to use your brain and not your mouths so much.
You stand corrected.

According to a study done by U-Haul International Inc. in 2009, among states that have more than 20,000 families moving, Kentucky has the highest percentage of growth with 5.76% more families moving into the state than out of the state. Florida, Georgia, Oklahoma, Illinois, Alabama, Washington DC, Louisiana, South Carolina, and Arizona round off the top 10 (in that order). You'd be right to guess that they aren't coming here to be unemployed. Kentucky lags during booms but we usually don't crash like a "boom town" either. Slow and steady.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-01-2010, 05:21 PM
 
6,297 posts, read 13,182,702 times
Reputation: 2789
Quote:
Originally Posted by bbkennedy View Post
You stand corrected.

According to a study done by U-Haul International Inc. in 2009, among states that have more than 20,000 families moving, Kentucky has the highest percentage of growth with 5.76% more families moving into the state than out of the state. Florida, Georgia, Oklahoma, Illinois, Alabama, Washington DC, Louisiana, South Carolina, and Arizona round off the top 10 (in that order). You'd be right to guess that they aren't coming here to be unemployed. Kentucky lags during booms but we usually don't crash like a "boom town" either. Slow and steady.
It is pretty funny to prove misinformed blanket statements wrong with cold, hard data. Nice post.

To Shively/Chicago, also a nice post. I disagree with a few things. Louisville is more of an indie, local city as oppossed to small strip mall haven, but you happen to live in a part of town that is very much a strip mall haven, so your perspective is likely skewed. That said, you made a very nice post, and hopefully you will contribute more here. People need to see more constructive criticism of the city such as you have made. We see too many people here who either all out love the city or all out hate it. What happens is those that hate it tend to come in and make all out blanket statements like it sucks, its dead, theres terrible schools, yet they have zero data to back up their claims. When you provide them with hard data, numbers, facts, and publications, they tend to become quiet.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Kentucky > Louisville area
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top