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Old 09-07-2009, 08:46 PM
 
Location: Dixie's Sunny Shore
1,366 posts, read 2,842,821 times
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The scenery in KY isn't bad at all. I know it doesn't compete with the PNW, but KY is a beautiful state. I've researched both areas and would pick Louisville hands down. It seems like a more fun city and close to Indy and Cincy. And for sports, I'd take the Louisville Cardinals over the Portland Trailblazers any day. Oh, and, hey cobolt.
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Old 09-07-2009, 09:31 PM
 
Location: Blankity-blank!
11,449 posts, read 13,915,518 times
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I moved to Louisville from Chicago almost 8 years ago.
Like previous posters mentioned, Louisville "liberal" is not like "liberal" in other places. How true! The city has some interesting pockets, but overall I think it's conservative, especially in the blue collar areas. You'll see many (macho) guys with shaved heads or buzz cuts, Harley t-shirts, wearing baseball caps backward, and plenty of country music everywhere. The redneck stereotype exists here. You'll hear the "n" word quite often. Also, be prepared to encounter many adults who have problems with 5th grade level english.
Kentucky is a staunchly red state.
Religion reigns. The leader of the Southern Baptists is in Louisville. Not long ago a church in Louisville requested the people to bring their guns for the service.
The local media has plenty of religion, plus right wing talk has saturated radio. The University of Louisville, unlike most universities across the nation, has no radio station. Therefore, the FM radio dial is dominated by corporate rock (hard rock, southern macho boogie, metal, country).
Well known rock bands make detours around Louisville. Out of the ordinary films (foreign, independent) are shown, but rarely.
Someone already mentioned the St James Court Art Fair. It's a fair for well made ornaments and decorations, but little art.
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Old 09-08-2009, 12:43 PM
 
844 posts, read 1,769,657 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Visvaldis View Post
You'll hear the "n" word quite often. Also, be prepared to encounter many adults who have problems with 5th grade level english.
Sounds like Chicago, Detroit, NY, L.A.
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Old 09-08-2009, 02:17 PM
 
Location: Dayton, OH
1,225 posts, read 3,878,500 times
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Quote:
The local media has plenty of religion, plus right wing talk has saturated radio. The University of Louisville, unlike most universities across the nation, has no radio station. Therefore, the FM radio dial is dominated by corporate rock (hard rock, southern macho boogie, metal, country).
This is a misleading half-truth.

UofL used to hold the liscensce to WUOL. WUOL is still on the air as part of the Public Radio Partnership. The other two stations that are part of this are WPFL and WFPK, liscensed to the library.

The partnership is sort of a joint venture, where the three stations coordinate fundraising and programming. So UofL might not be directly involved but there are three public radio stations in the city.

This would be akin to Cincinnati, which also has three public stations, WNKU, WVXU, and WGUC. WGUC and WVXU are similar to the public radio partnership in that they coordinate programming. Cincy does have two community radio stations, WOBO (which does a wide variety of programming) and the part-time WAIF (which has sort of an activist bent, simialar to the Pacifica stations in California). Louisville doesn't have this kind of community radio.

However, to imply the only thing thats on the air is generic commercial radio and Christian stuff is just bull****...

Last edited by JefferyT; 09-08-2009 at 02:36 PM..
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Old 09-08-2009, 04:09 PM
 
6,296 posts, read 13,179,782 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JefferyT View Post
This is a misleading half-truth.

UofL used to hold the liscensce to WUOL. WUOL is still on the air as part of the Public Radio Partnership. The other two stations that are part of this are WPFL and WFPK, liscensed to the library.

The partnership is sort of a joint venture, where the three stations coordinate fundraising and programming. So UofL might not be directly involved but there are three public radio stations in the city.

This would be akin to Cincinnati, which also has three public stations, WNKU, WVXU, and WGUC. WGUC and WVXU are similar to the public radio partnership in that they coordinate programming. Cincy does have two community radio stations, WOBO (which does a wide variety of programming) and the part-time WAIF (which has sort of an activist bent, simialar to the Pacifica stations in California). Louisville doesn't have this kind of community radio.

However, to imply the only thing thats on the air is generic commercial radio and Christian stuff is just bull****...
Which is what Visvaldis is here for. I am also a native Chicagoan. Visvaldis must be stuck in Fairdale and takes day trips to Bullit County. His post is such an exaggeration that it barely describes the hinterlands of Louisville metro.

As noted, one could also exaggerate and say Chicago or NYC is full of people who read on the fifth grade level and tote guns and act macho, although they may not be caucasion and wear "Harley shirts." (also a gross exaggeration).

Given a city its size, Louisville's radio stations are decent, but crappy radio is a national plague. Fact is, Clear Channel controls almost 70% of all radio stations nationwide. I got news for Visvaldis...outside the top 10 major cities, almost every city has the exact same radio stations, and this has really become more so in the last 5-10 years. Louisville, unlike many cities its size, had an excellent listener supported station in WFPK, which does great things for the music community locally.

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I am no radio expert, but Louisville most certainly has at least one community radio station in addition to the three public stations mentioned by JeffreyT. WNAS out of New Albany, Indiana is the station of New Albany High School and does an excellent job with community programming. It is a high school station as good as some college stations I have heard, and just to reiterate, I have been to over 70% of the nation's largest metros and several dozen more of its smaller ones, so I think I am able to form a validated opinion .
http://www.wnas.org/
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Old 09-08-2009, 09:09 PM
 
Location: Dayton, OH
1,225 posts, read 3,878,500 times
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WFPK is a lot like WYSO here in Dayton and maybe WNKU (http://www.wnku.org/page_wnku.asp - broken link) in Cincy, except they have more music and less news/talk. I think NPR stuff like All Things Considered s on WPFL. Incidentally WYSO was one of the co-sponsors of this past Forecastle Festival.

WUOL, the old UofL station, resembles WDPR here in Dayton in that it has a 24-7 classical format.

There is a school board owned station in Dayton, WDPS, that does part-time programming (daytime, weekdays) mostly in jazz and blues. It's DJed, mostly, by high school kids.
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Old 09-26-2009, 02:13 PM
 
Location: IN
98 posts, read 522,350 times
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You don't say where you were from to begin with. Where are you living now?
How far do you have to move to make the change for either one? What is your income now?
Yes it sometimes does get very hot and sticky. If you live in a air conditioned place, go to your air conditioned job, in your air conditioned car, then you may never be bothered by it much. If you don't have a nice air conditioned abode and a flaky air conditioner in your car and no air where you work, well, you will be very hot and sticky. <smile>
Do you get the news where you are about the amount of people who die every year on this side of the U.S. from the heat/humidity? Are you prepared if you have never been or lived here for your corn flakes to get soft from the humidity? This will happen to all your food if you don't have good insulation/air conditioning. Well, I've even had sort of humidity effected sugar packets in restaurants here.
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Old 09-26-2009, 02:18 PM
 
Location: IN
98 posts, read 522,350 times
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An after thought:
Portland and Louisville are very far apart in miles. Very far apart in life style.
Maybe you should evaluate your own life style, personalities, education, and income earning abilities. I've lived in both places and they are very, very different in all ways. If you are from Ca. then keep in mind that you will face some discrimination for that in Oregon. Is Mama's still there? Wonderful huge donuts. yum

Last edited by asassyvic; 09-26-2009 at 02:20 PM.. Reason: I saw a typo but not seeing it now. Not sure why
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Old 09-26-2009, 08:11 PM
 
6,296 posts, read 13,179,782 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by asassyvic View Post
An after thought:
Portland and Louisville are very far apart in miles. Very far apart in life style.
Maybe you should evaluate your own life style, personalities, education, and income earning abilities. I've lived in both places and they are very, very different in all ways. If you are from Ca. then keep in mind that you will face some discrimination for that in Oregon. Is Mama's still there? Wonderful huge donuts. yum
In some ways Louisville and Portland are very different, but the inyd vibe in the older parts of town are very similar. Portland has a much worse drug problem and Louisville probably has more crime, with quite a few less suburbs. That said, the old urban areas of the towns seem similar in many ways to me. The vibe to Louisville is similar to Portland, Austin, and similar other towns. On a smaller scale regionally, Bloomington, IN can be grouped in that mix.
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Old 01-04-2010, 10:56 PM
 
Location: Macao
15,695 posts, read 34,693,659 times
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Hmm..this is interesting. I lived in Portland for a year...certainly a nice little city.

It is interesting I haven't heard more of Louisville as a hipster haven...but it certainly makes sense.

Also interesting as I was reading a Nashville thread about where is the Highlands equivalent...and posters were saying that Nashville has a LONG ways to go.

Also interesting the heavy catholic german/irish influence in Louisville...filled with Irish bars.

Than the entire bluegrass culture...and Kentucky seems like it would have the positives of what people like about the music and such...I can see the potential there.

This thread is making me much more curious about Louisville!
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