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Old 08-01-2006, 07:55 AM
 
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I posted on another thread that we are considering moving to Lexington next year. This past week-end I got a book on Kentucky and Louisville sounds interesting too!! We are planning a trip to Kentucky later this month and now I am thinking we should check out both cities! I have also read other very informative threads here about the statistics on each city which were most helpful. BUT - I need some help in figuring out NEIGHBORHOODS (ZIP CODES!!) to check in Louisville! We would like a NEWER subdivision - under 20 years old - colonial-type houses with average yards, low crime, close to shopping, not too far from downtown, etc.!! HELP!!! Thanks!!
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Old 08-01-2006, 09:27 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn New York
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I had some old family friends who moved to Louisville years ago. We used to visit quite often. Sorry but I can't think of the neighborhood they lived in. They all ended up doing the Arizona thing.
Of course, Southern Indiana is right across the river too. The last of their family to leave, lived there for quite a while.

Where are you guys moving from??
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Old 08-01-2006, 01:04 PM
 
Location: Old Louisville
108 posts, read 566,200 times
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Hello Lillie and thanks for considering Louisville. I think you'll find that both it and Lexington are too nice, but quite different cities. Anyway, on to your questions:


Quote:
...need some help in figuring out NEIGHBORHOODS (ZIP CODES!!) to check in Louisville! We would like a NEWER subdivision - under 20 years old - colonial-type houses with average yards, low crime, close to shopping, not too far from downtown, etc.!!...
Okay, well to start off with, I'll give you a brief run-down of how Jefferson County is set-up. Back in 2003, Louisville and Jefferson County approved a ballot measure to merge into a consolidated city-county government named Louisville-Jefferson County Metro Government (official long form) and Louisville Metro (official short form). Officially, Jefferson County and Louisville became the same thing. However, some of the smaller cities bordering Louisville retained some remnants of their local government and, while considered to be part of the Louisville Metro, are not officially counted in Louisville's population (confusing I know). Anyway, just wanted to clear that up so you don't get confused when I later refer to a "city" and "neighborhood" in Louisville. Okay, with that out of the way, let's move on to your question.

First thing, West end is out (anything west of I-65 and north of I-264). That is the rough side of Louisville and I'd advise you to steer clear of it. Your best areas are going to be South/East sides of the city or maybe even over in Indiana. Also, you may want to consider some of the smaller cities that surround Louisville. They still have a rural feel to them and provide a lot of benefits without a lot of the problems of larger cities.

Outside Louisville-Jefferson County:

Shepherdsville - This city is about 20-25 due south of downtown and is located in Bullit County (using interstates). While you are not in Louisville-Jefferson County, you are still close to the city and in (what I am told) is a very nice/smaller sized town (larger lots, less crime, good schoolsd, but still very close to Louisville). While I personally enjoy living in the city, I will admit that I do like Bullit county. Zip Code is 40165.


Mount Washington - Also in Bullit county. About 25-30 minutes out from downtown (using interstates). However, it is a gorgeous area and has a lot of benefits of a small town (small crime, less pollution, etc). Might want to check it out as well. Zip Code is 40047.

Clarksville/Jeffersonville, IN - directly across from Louisville in Indiana. Depending on where you live, you can be 5-20 minutes from downtown. Has some nicer neighborhoods and property is usually cheaper on this side of the river. Also, there are some newer subdivisions under construction you may wish to visit. Zip Codes are 47129, 47130, 47131, 47132, 47133, 47134, 47144, and 47199 for Jeffersonville and 47129 and 47131 for Clarksville respectively.

New Albany, IN - Directly across from the Northwestern tip of Louisville. downtown is 10-20 minutes away. Population for the city is somewhere around 37,000 I think. Some nicer homes in the area and, in my opinion, feels more like an independent city rather than like a suburb of Louisville. Zip Codes are 47150 and 47151.

In Jefferson County, but incorporated cities (they are essentially a suburb/neighborhood of Louisville):

Middletown (in specifically, Lake Forest Area) - 20-25 minutes from the heart of downtown. Some VERY nice communities (lake Forest) with very large sized homes. Has some nicer end private schools and is located on the east end of Louisville. Only downside is you are kind of far away from the downtown action (although, compared with some cities, a 20 minute commute is not bad). Zip codes are 40243 and 40253

Anchorage - 20-25 minutes from downtown. Very nice area of Louisville with upper class housing (median income for a family was over 120K). Farther out but a nice area if you can afford it. Again, same problem as middletown...kind of far out. Zip Codes is 40223.

Jeffersontown - a city in Jefferson County, Kentucky. Population is around 26K. When the government of Jefferson County merged with the city of Louisville, Kentucky in 2003, its citizens became part of Louisville Metro, however, for Census purposes, it is not counted towards the population of Louisville. I personally think this is kind of stupid because if you look at a map, it is basically a nub sticking off of Louisville. Anyway, has some nicer homes...about 20 minutes to downtown. Zip Codes are 40269 and 40299 respectively.

Last edited by rppipa01; 08-01-2006 at 02:01 PM..
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Old 08-01-2006, 01:37 PM
 
Location: Old Louisville
108 posts, read 566,200 times
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In Jefferson County, but incorporated cities (they are essentially a suburb/neighborhood of Louisville):

Middletown (in specifically, Lake Forest Area) - 20-25 minutes from the heart of downtown. Some VERY nice communities (lake Forest) with very large sized homes. Has some nicer end private schools and is located on the east end of Louisville. Only downside is you are kind of far away from the downtown action (although, compared with some cities, a 20 minute commute is not bad). Zip codes are 40243 and 40253

Anchorage - 20-25 minutes from downtown. Very nice area of Louisville with upper class housing (median income for a family was over 120K). Farther out but a nice area if you can afford it. Zip Codes is 40223.

Jeffersontown - Population is around 26K. When the government of Jefferson County merged with the city of Louisville, Kentucky in 2003, its citizens became part of Louisville Metro, however, for Census purposes, it is not counted towards the population of Louisville. I personally think this is kind of stupid because if you look at a map, it is basically a nub sticking off of Louisville. Anyway, has some nicer homes...about 20 minutes to downtown. Zip Codes are 40269 and 40299 respectively.

Saint Matthews - As of 2004, the population recorded by the U.S. Census Bureau is 17,374. Some nicer homes and close to two very good private schools. Also close to several parks and St. Matthews/Oxmoore mall (Sadly, Louisville lacks any large scale malls).

Mockingbird Valley - VERY EXPENSIVE. Average family income is over 200K a year. Located directly to the east of Louisville along the Ohio River, Mockingbird Valley is frequently referred to as a "country enclave" and is noted for its rural feel. It is located on river bluffs and rolling hills, with large homes set back from the road, heavy tree density, bridges and walls using traditional local materials, as well as undisturbed rock outcroppings. One third of the roads are privately owned, and the entire city is zoned residential except for a small parking lot, which is zoned commercial. The population was 190 at the 2000 census. It has the highest per capita income of any location in Kentucky, and the tenth highest of any location in America.

Glenview/Riverwood/Indian Hills - Northeast of downtown. Similiar to mockingbird valley with a little less in cost.

True Neighborhoods of Louisville:

Highlands - one of my favorite sections of the city. Very close to downtown at 10-15 minutes. Lot of older style homes but they are amazing (Eastern Parkways is an incredible drive). Also has Bardstown Road (lot of unique/weird shops/bars/Wick's pizza). Several large parks (Cherokee and Seneca) are very close. I would highly recommend this area. Don't know the zip code.

Highview - Nice section of the city. Mainly middle class style housing. Zip Code is 40228. Probably 20 minutes to downtown.

Fern Creek - I consider it to be a nice section of Louisville (some may disagree). After the merger, it became a neighborhood of Louisville. May want to look more at this area since it is in the city. About 10-15 minutes to downtown. Homes I have seen here are on tree-lined subdivision and suggest comfort rather than wealth. Zip Code is 40291.

Downtwon - Might want to look into downtown living as several new lofts/Condos are opening in the downtown area).

Last edited by rppipa01; 08-01-2006 at 02:02 PM..
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Old 08-01-2006, 01:59 PM
 
Location: Old Louisville
108 posts, read 566,200 times
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Things I'd recommend to do when you visit Louisville (no particular order):

The Speed Art Museum - Opened in 1927, the speed art museum is the oldest and largest art museum in the state of Kentucky. Located adjacent to the University of Louisville, the museum features over 1,200 pieces of art in its permanent collection.

The Frazier International History Museum - Opened in 2004, the Frazier features a collection of arms, armor, and related historical artifacts spanning 1,000 years, concentrating on U.S. and UK arms. The building features three stories of exhibits, two reenactment arenas, a 120-seat auditorium, and a 48-seat movie theater.

The Muhammad Ali Center - Opened November 19, 2005 in the downtown area, the center features Muhammad Ali's boxing memorabilia, as well as information on the core themes that he has taken to heart: peace, social responsibility, respect and personal growth.

21C - a Modern Art museum and hotel. Very unique and easy to spot (look for red penguins).

The Belle of Louisville, the oldest Mississippi-style steamboat in operation in the United States.

Fort Knox, in nearby Hardin County, is home to the Fort Knox Bullion Depository and the Patton Museum of Cavalry and Armor.

The Historic Locust Grove farm, former home of Louisville Founder George Rogers Clark, portrays life in the early days of the city.

Waterfront/Cherokee Parks and Jefferson Memorial Forest - two large parks. The Louisville Waterfront Park is prominently located on the banks of the Ohio River near downtown, and features large open areas, which often feature free concerts and other festivals. Cherokee Park is also one of the larger parks in the city, covering 409 acres (1.7 km˛), and features many bicycle and nature trails, basketball courts, baseball fields and picnic pavilions. Going a bit further out from the downtown area is the Jefferson Memorial Forest which, at 5,500 acres (22 km˛), is the largest urban forest in the United States. The forest is designated as a National Audubon Society wildlife refuge, and offers over 30 miles (50 km) of various hiking trails. Camping and fishing are both permitted. Iroquois Park was planned by Frederick Law Olmsted as a "scenic reservation" of forested hillsides and breathtaking vistas. The park features the WPA-era Iroquois Amphitheater, an open-air theater that was recently remodeled to accomodate 2,407 people. Very nice for an Urban lanscape.

Churchill Downs is home to the Kentucky Derby, the largest sports event in the state, and also home to the Kentucky Derby Museum which focuses on the history of the Kentucky Derby and Churchill Downs. The museum also contains a number of exhibits exploring the training and racing of thoroughbred horses. It includes a 360-degree cinema that shows the short film "The Greatest Race," a documentary about the Kentucky Derby. The museum is open year-round.

If you are here August 17-27, you may want to go to The Kentucky State at the Kentucky Exposition Center. It features an array of culture from all areas of Kentucky.

Falls of the Ohio State Park is right across the river and provides a glimpse into what the Ohio river was like before the locks and dams.

A little outside of Louisville (25 miles from downtown) is Kentucky's Official Arboretum, the Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest. Bernheim's 240-acre arboretum contains over 1,900 labeled varieties of trees, shrubs and other plants. Designated Kentucky's Official Arboretum, this living museum features a number of impressive collections, including over 185 varieties of American hollies. Other collections of interest include maples, crab apples,
conifers (including dwarf conifers), oaks, buckeyes, ginkgos, ornamental pears and dogwoods.

Louisville Sluggers - Triple A affliate of the Cincinnati Reds. Very nice outdoor stadium that is designed like an old railroad terminal.

Take a drive through Old Louisville, a historic preservation district and neighborhood right next to downtown. It is the third largest such district in the United States, and the single largest neighborhood featuring purely Victorian architecture. Make sure to check out St. James Court (hosts the St. James Court Art show).

Oh yeah, and if you'd like really good pizza, try Wick's Chicken/Bacon/Ranch Pizza. It's amazing. Hope all this helps!
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Old 08-01-2006, 03:04 PM
 
36 posts, read 153,751 times
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To rppipa01 - THANK YOU SO MUCH!!! You are so nice to have taken the time to post all of that info!! What a treasure-trove of knowledge you are!! Thanks again!
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Old 08-01-2006, 04:50 PM
 
Location: Old Louisville
108 posts, read 566,200 times
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One other thing to note, Louisville, like other larger sized cities, does have its share of problems. As I mentioned earlier, the west end does have a very bad crime problem (which sometimes spills over into Old Louisville and surrounding neighborhoods). Also, when Louisville was built, the engineers designed the sewer and road drainage as a common system. As a result, on very rainy days, you get backflows of smells that are not very....nice. This particular problem is confined mainly to downtown and the older parts of the city and they are trying to solve the problem (300 million or so so it'll probably take awhile). The suburbs generally have less in terms of crime/stinky sewer problem, however, you do face longer commutes. My girlfriend lives in Middletown and I live in Old Louisville. It is a 30 minute commute out to her house (using interstates and bypasses). So it is a trade off. Having said that, traffic is *usually* not that bad. Local people tend to complain a lot about traffic congestion, but if you've every lived in a place like New York/Chicago/Major metro area, you'll probably laugh (I have actually been in only 1 bit of traffic that was standstill in 3 years).

One point that a lot of people out in the state are critical of is that Louisville usually doesn't seem to have its act together politically (sometimes you feel like you should just clean house with the politicians). In my opinion, I think a lot of it is still residual from the merger (everyone still focusing on their piece of the pie instead of what is best for the city overall) and the fact that Louisville usually gets *****ed out by the State (approximately 25% of the state budget is funded by Jefferson County, but they only get about 12-17% of the budget back). However, I do think that our leaders are starting to make some, if slow, progress at moving the ball forward. Also, Louisville is probably more diverse (socio-economically, politically, religiously, and ethnically) than most of the rest of the state. While I like diversity, it can sometimes cause problems (i.e. the above situation).

Louisville also, in my opinion, suffers from monetary drain and backlash. Louisville, and to a much lesser extent, Northern Kentucky and Lexington, basically pay for the state to function. Not that that is a bad thing, but it can also hinder the advancements and progress of the city. In addition, there sometimes seem to be an attitude of “if we don’t take as much as we can then those people in Louisville will get it” or that Louisville is a “dirty city” because it is now surrounded by farmland. If you have ever been to Gary Indiana (south side of Chicago), then you know what a dirty city is. The West End is as rough as it gets, and even then, it is not as frightening as ghettos in LA, Chicago, or even Cincy. The “let’s stand against Louisville” attitude pervades from locals to the general assembly. I, myself, have never really fully understood this attitude (whether it is borne out of economic greed, the HUGE culture differences between Louisville and the more rural parts of the state, or if it is possibly a residual effect that U of L is UK’s rival…hence making Louisville the state’s rival). In that regard, Louisville has been slow to make up lost ground and this fact will most likely continue to be a problem through the future. I do sometimes wish that KY could be more like IN, WA, OR, OH, or CO and take pride in their larger cities.

In terms of weather, Louisville has beautiful springs and early summers. Late summer/fall tend to be hot with August the worst month by far (90s and humid…welcome to the south). Normally, the city does not get very much snow and winters are fairly mild compared to other places I’ve been (WI for example). However, in any season, temperatures can vary widely day by day, because of Louisville's location where many fronts often converge. Severe thunderstorms are not uncommon; the area can have an occasional tornado (these are FAR more prominent in Indiana however).,
Much like Los Angeles, Louisville's valley location traps air pollution. Because of this, the city is ranked as one of Environmental Defense's fifty worst cities for air. Louisville also often exemplifies the heat island effect. Temperatures in commercial areas and in the industrialized areas along interstates are often higher than in the suburbs, particularly the shaded areas, like Anchorage, where temperatures are often five degrees cooler. Personally though, I don’t feel like the air pollution here is as bad as everyone makes it out to be. It is a city and cities have poluttion…that is just a fact of living in one.
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Old 08-01-2006, 04:53 PM
 
Location: Old Louisville
108 posts, read 566,200 times
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Hopefully, I didn't scare you too much with that last post. Just keep in mind that most anywhere you go, you'll find good points and bad points. Louisville has many brightsides to it, but like every larger city, it also has downsides. If you have any sort of questions, feel free to ask.

I have been to Lexington several times and I think what ymbk said in another thread is pretty much dead-on. When you compare Lexington and Louisville (or Raleigh), you have to keep in mind that they are very different cities and they will appeal to different types of people. For example, here are just some of my opinions:

Lexington's Good Points:

Fairly low crime rate
Beautiful countryside surround the city
Good school system
Less pollution
Smaller "hometown" feel
People who live here usually love it
Most people in the stae like lexington (probably due to UK basketball).

Lexington's Bad points

TRAFFIC is horrible for a city so small
Shakier economy
Less diversity/more of a cliquish sort of feel
Even though pop. is just under 300K, it feels like a >100K city.
Revolves around UK culturally/economically (along with horse farms)
Attitude
Hot/Humid
Big Blue Crazies


Louisville Good Points:

For a large sized city, very clean and well kept.
Lot of diversity, culturally and economically independent of its colleges
Traffic is fairly good for metro area with a short avg. commute time (>17 mins).
Great Park system
More stable econimcally (though it does have its problems)
Lot of very good private schools
Feels like it's population size (mid-sized).
More to do.

Louisville Bad Points

Crime is higher, though this is mostly a downtown area problem
Worse pollution
Hot/Humid
State/Local Politics can stagnant city at times
Self image has been hurt from decades of past state neglect
A lot of people in the state don't like Louisville.
When compared to other area cities (Cincy/Indy, etc..), Louisville is like a smaller brother (i.e. no pro-sports, less economically sucessful, less culture, etc...).

I tried to give a neutral few point on both. Like I said before, I think once you visit, you'll start to see the differences that I am talking about.

Last edited by Marka; 08-02-2006 at 12:08 PM.. Reason: merged
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Old 08-01-2006, 06:17 PM
 
36 posts, read 153,751 times
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To rppipa01 - WOW!! THANKS AGAIN!! You are amazing! I'm glad you gave us some of the "bad" points about each city. Good to have a "realistic" picture of the areas! I have been on a real estate site using your Zip Codes to look up housing costs, etc. Very pleased so far! Middlletown, Anchorage, and Jeffersontown look very promising! Are there "non-freeway" type roads going into the city from these areas? I'm not a big fan of interstates, etc., though my husband doesn't mind them! Also, do you know if there are any Community Colleges near these areas? And in which part of town is the U. of Louisville? Our teen will be attending college after we make the move. One more question - where are the shopping malls?! Thanks again - you are wonderful to take all of this time to answer our questions!!(P.S. - enjoyed your last post about statistics on my other thread!)
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Old 08-01-2006, 07:43 PM
 
Location: Old Louisville
108 posts, read 566,200 times
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Quote:
Are there "non-freeway" type roads going into the city from these areas?
Louisville, like other big cities, is easiest to travel around by using free-ways/by-passes. It is easy if you imagine Louisville as a cart-wheel. I-71 from cincinnati, I- 64 from Lexington and St. Louis, and I-65 from Indianapolis to Nasheville act as the spokes with I-264 (Watterson expressway...inner circle) and I-265 (Synder...outer circle) looping around the city. These aren't true by-passes as they don't entirely circle the city. Rather, they act more like heavy inner-city highway systems. The only truly bad part of the interstate system is downtown at the junction. I-64 merges with I-71 and then, 1 mile later, crosses I-65. This is where lmost all of Louisville's conguestion occurs simply because the ramps and design is horrible. This is also one of the most dangerous roads in KY at the moment, but hopefully will be fixed by 2020 (they are redesigning the junction, adding a new downtown bridge for I-65, and completing I-265 into IN to make it a cresent shaped bypass).

Bearing that in mind, there are non free-way based alternatives, though they have stop lights and are usually slower. Before the free-ways, major roads radiating out from Louisville were named for the outlying town that they connected to. U.S. 60/Shelbyville Road is a highway running from Shelbyville, through Middletown/St. Matthews to Downtown (where it becomes Frankfort Ave.). This road also has Oxmoore and Mall of St. Matthews (sadly, Louisville does not have any large scale malls like Cincy...St. Matthews is a small to mid-size mall but is the biggest indoor in the city). 1747 is north of Anchorage and also runs downtown (Anchorage is right between 1747 and Middletown). Hurstbourne is a major road running N/S between Middletown and St. Matthews. It has a lot of food/shopping along it (also has an ice rink on it). All of these can have moderate to heavy traffic during rush hour, especially in St. Matthews (since it is very commercial area and has the mall).

Other major roads include Bardstown Rd (highway 150) which runs through the highlands to Bardstown, KY. It has a lot of bars/food/unique shops, though it can become quite congested during peak hours. River Road along the Ohio feeds downtown from North-eastern suburbs (runs along I-71). Eastern Parkway is a feeder for traffic between barstown and I-65. Outer Loop runs between 264 and 265 and also has Jefferson Mall (my fav) on it.
Jeffersontown is bi-sected by Highway 155 (Taylorsville Road). Popular Level runs basically the same way Bardstown does and connects downtown to just past the Watterson in the SE

Again, I personally would simply use the free-way system (you can get anywhere in the city in 30 minutes or so), but if you are dead set against it and don't mind slower travel time, their are alternatives. One More point, if you look at a map of Louisville, I-264 (inner) is the more heavily used of the two circle free-ways. I-265 is far out from the city and does not have near the development that the Watterson does, though this is starting to change as room in Jefferson county shrinks.

Last edited by rppipa01; 08-01-2006 at 08:12 PM..
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