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Old 05-08-2022, 02:01 AM
 
Location: Sparta, TN
860 posts, read 1,624,595 times
Reputation: 995

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I've been given an opportunity to work remotely for a California employer. I know that TX doesn't really like Californians because they tend to bring their liberal ideas with them and corrupt the areas that they go to like a virus. I'm politically very conservative (even for TX) so don't think that I fall in the same category.

I want to leave California because I disagree with just about everything that they do but have been trapped by my employment for the past 6+ years. I can now go anywhere that I want so am starting the search by looking at areas that don't have a state income tax and that are compatible with my political beliefs. I've lived in Las Cruces, NM before and like the weather there but El Paso county is very liberal. It's also too large and right across from one of the most violent cities in Mexico (Juarez). Las Cruces was nice in that it was a smaller town but still had El Paso within driving distance if you needed something not available locally. I also lived in Los Alamos but found that a bit too small at 12K population and the next large town was Santa Fe @ 84K population and 45 minutes away.

I'm thinking maybe Lubbock or Amarillo since they're close to the same elevation as El Paso but much more conservative. Schools are a non-factor for me -- no kids. I'm in my 50's so could see whatever place I move being where I retire. I feel that these cities would have enough amenities without being too large. Both are about 2x the size of the city of Santa Maria which is where I am currently. As long as I can get a decent internet connection for work, I think I'd be covered. Biggest concern with either would be the crime rate and homeless population. I guess another concern would be the smell of manure -- can you get away from that in Lubbock? I like cattle but preferably as a nice steak -- I'd rather not smell their waste in my home.
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Old 05-08-2022, 06:57 PM
Status: "America First!" (set 4 days ago)
 
Location: Suburban Dallas
51,684 posts, read 45,233,556 times
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Default The Case For Lubbock On A Move

Even though I don't live in Lubbock, the times that I've visited there did not include a manure smell. I think it's pretty safe to say you don't have to worry about it in nearly all locations of the city. The hottest areas where houses have sold the most are in the south and southwest parts of Lubbock, many near what is now F.M. Road 1585 (future State Loop 88), in the Wolfforth area (suburb just southwest of Lubbock), and on the west side of town. Lots of new businesses continue to pop up in town, and depending on what kind of job you have, there should be no problem if you decide to transition. It is a conservative area who just elected a dynamic new mayor yesterday (at this writing), and the city also gets 300 days of sunshine each year. Everywhere you turn in this city, there is dirt being turned, as construction is very active here. They do have an occasional dust storm every now and then, but that shouldn't be cause for alarm.

I would recommend you look up the following website and save it to your favorites.

https://lubbockintheloop.com/
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Old 05-09-2022, 01:28 AM
 
Location: Sparta, TN
860 posts, read 1,624,595 times
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I wasn't trying to be offensive to the good people of Lubbock. I just read on a forum by somebody who obviously hated Lubbock that a manure smell was one of the complaints. Another complaint was the wind which I do believe is accurate. To me, the wind is what you complain about when there are no other weather complaints though. Thanks for the URL.
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Old 05-09-2022, 01:43 AM
 
Location: Oklahoma
15,397 posts, read 11,205,334 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sparrow_temp View Post
I wasn't trying to be offensive to the good people of Lubbock. I just read on a forum by somebody who obviously hated Lubbock that a manure smell was one of the complaints. Another complaint was the wind which I do believe is accurate. To me, the wind is what you complain about when there are no other weather complaints though. Thanks for the URL.
The "manure smell" is more apt to occur on the north sides of Lubbock. You won't really get that outside of that part of town. That is where most of the Ag and industrial areas are but not where any decent residential are is located.

And yes it is really windy. But the biggest problem in that area is the dust. There are frequent dust storms there and they occasionally rise to 1930s style black blizzards. In the spring there is dust in the air most of the time at some level. Mostly it's just haze but it sometimes reaches a fog type level. By summer the cotton anchors the soil and it is a lot better. Then after they harvest the cotton you can get an occasional dust storm in fall or winter. But late winter and spring are pretty rough on your nose and eyes.

Amarillo is colder but less dusty. Midland Odessa doesn't quite get as much dust either but anywhere they grow a lot of cotton in west Texas is prone to dust.
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Old 05-09-2022, 01:45 PM
 
Location: Kaufman County, Texas
11,309 posts, read 24,789,215 times
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if you don't like the smell, take Amarillo off your list. There are many HUGE cattle feedlots and packing plants in the area.
The wind really is an issue up in the panhandle plains. It blows ALL THE TIME, and yes, there are huge haboob-style dust storms several times a year. That, along with the completely FLAT land rules it out for me.

Have you looked at west central Texas? There is a lot more scenery/terrain, and it's just as conservative as the panhandle. look at Abilene and San Angelo. Both are college/military towns, so they have a lot of entertainment and shopping, along with good internet.
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Old 05-09-2022, 02:52 PM
 
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In general, there are two primary economic aspects of American agriculture, e.g. farming and ranching. Since both involve mostly rural aspects, both tend to be politically conservative. Amarillo (on the Texas Panhandle) is primarily ranching and Lubbock (on the Texas South Plains) is primarily farming and, for the most part, even the urbanites are in full realization of where their money originates.

Unless you choose to live NE of any concentrated feeding operation (feedyards, dairies, etc.), the smell of manure in the air is uncommon in Lubbock since our winds tend to normally blow from the SW. I can't speak for Amarillo since I have never lived there.

BTW, I learned many years ago that no one out here just lives out here in NW Texas. If you find yourself here, no matter the reason or whether in town or in a rural setting, you will either love or you either despise it. Experience has taught me that it has to do with toughness of the spirit which many folks seem to lack these days.

Also, I will say my tiny farm is directly NE of Lubbock and in the 12 years I've been out here, I've never smelled manure. Lots of tumbleweeds, dust devils, a small amount of light pollution and a few tornadoes but no manure smell.

Last edited by High_Plains_Retired; 05-09-2022 at 03:13 PM..
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Old 05-10-2022, 01:21 AM
 
Location: Sparta, TN
860 posts, read 1,624,595 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChristieP View Post
...
Have you looked at west central Texas? There is a lot more scenery/terrain, and it's just as conservative as the panhandle. look at Abilene and San Angelo. Both are college/military towns, so they have a lot of entertainment and shopping, along with good internet.
I have not. I was looking further west because I didn't want hot and humid with horrendous heat indexes. I've lived in Las Cruces, NM for several years and was kind of comparing things with that climate which I didn't find bad -- hot days with low humidity so the temps came down enough at night to make things comfortable. I'm not familiar enough with this area to judge what the climate might be. It seems to be on the border of where things become more desert like. Climate data just shows things in general a few degrees higher on both high and lows. I'm not sure at what point a totally different location like Cookeville, TN might become more attractive.

I appreciate you bringing the Abilene/San Angelo area to my attention though. What subforum here would be most appropriate for that location? Just the general TX forum?
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Old 05-10-2022, 06:55 AM
 
Location: Kaufman County, Texas
11,309 posts, read 24,789,215 times
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Yes, just the general “Texas” forum would be best for Abilene and San Angelo.

I’m not a climatologist, but most of Texas west of the Hill Country will be low humidity. The only exceptions would be around lakes or close to rivers. My husband and I loved living in San Angelo (we are both ASU alumni) for the 6-7 years we each spent there.
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Old 05-10-2022, 11:14 AM
 
Location: Sparta, TN
860 posts, read 1,624,595 times
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Thank you. Good to know.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChristieP View Post
Yes, just the general “Texas” forum would be best for Abilene and San Angelo.

I’m not a climatologist, but most of Texas west of the Hill Country will be low humidity. The only exceptions would be around lakes or close to rivers. My husband and I loved living in San Angelo (we are both ASU alumni) for the 6-7 years we each spent there.
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Old 05-10-2022, 07:54 PM
 
Location: Texas
747 posts, read 1,383,656 times
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I have spent the last almost 40 years living in and around both Lubbock and Amarillo.

I *LIKE* both places, so my opinion is a little jaded.

Lubbock has more dirt in the wind.
Amarillo has a bit more wind.


Lubbock will occasionally smell like manure, if the wind blows just right. Even in West Lubbock.
Amarillo will smell like manure more often than Lubbock.

Lubbock has some nice areas to live in, mostly West-SouthWest, and South. Wolfforth is a nice little town that is melting into Lubbock. Other towns around Lubbock are slightly further out, but commutable. I do not know the status of internet in those small towns though.
Amarillo has some nice areas to live in, mostly on the South side, but some real nice places North/NorthWest too. Bushland is growing fast and is easily commutable. Canyon is south of Amarillo and is growing so fast it makes folks' heads spin. It is a really nice little town (I live there), and has newly installed Vexxus fiber and AT&T fiber in many of the neighborhoods. I am dumping cable internet next month and going fiber myself.

Lubbock is fairly conservative, however with the University in town there are plenty of liberals in town. Mostly no issue between the two.
Amarillo is fairly conservative, with pockets of liberal as well. Canyon has liberals too, in fact there are a number that I am neighbors with and we all get along just fine regardless of our differing views. Those neighbors are just plain nice folks.


As for Abilene, I have a number of friends there, although I don't visit often. Smaller city than either Lubbock or Amarillo, but certainly closer to the major population centers of Texas.
San Angelo is a pretty small city. I have family and friends there, but don't visit often there either. It is a nice little place though, if you don't mind being in a small city. I would not talk anyone out of a serious look at San Angelo.

I didn't offer much in the way of certainty, but maybe you can strain something useful out of this. Even coming from California, if you are nice and friendly to everyone, most will reciprocate. Those that do are worth knowing, so make some friends!
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