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Old 12-22-2010, 08:19 AM
 
Location: Maine
145 posts, read 136,121 times
Reputation: 161

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We have a bunch of young farmers who have bought or re-started farms around here. They sell at the Skowhegan Farmer's Market on Saturdays and are doing well. One has veggies, there's an orchard and another butchers and sells rabbits, ducks and chickens. It's a great thing for the town, but I think the best thing is that the farmer's market could turn into the market fo the town if Hannaford's can't feed the area in a few years.

It provides a model and something that can be expanded if needed.

I think we are going to be in real trouble starting in 2013, and maybe before if oil producers get wind of it. The price of a barrel of oil could go back up over $150, and that could lead to higher food prices.

I just heard this morning that higher meat prices are inevitable due to the quarter of the corn that's going to ethanol production.

Anyway I think that farmer's markets are a way to get ready for peak oil. Right now they are small, but they could scale up into something that can help us when peak oil really hits.
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Old 12-22-2010, 08:23 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
21,896 posts, read 28,750,580 times
Reputation: 8935
Quote:
Originally Posted by Revi View Post
We have a bunch of young farmers who have bought or re-started farms around here. They sell at the Skowhegan Farmer's Market on Saturdays and are doing well. One has veggies, there's an orchard and another butchers and sells rabbits, ducks and chickens. It's a great thing for the town, but I think the best thing is that the farmer's market could turn into the market fo the town if Hannaford's can't feed the area in a few years.

It provides a model and something that can be expanded if needed.

I think we are going to be in real trouble starting in 2013, and maybe before if oil producers get wind of it. The price of a barrel of oil could go back up over $150, and that could lead to higher food prices.

I just heard this morning that higher meat prices are inevitable due to the quarter of the corn that's going to ethanol production.

Anyway I think that farmer's markets are a way to get ready for peak oil. Right now they are small, but they could scale up into something that can help us when peak oil really hits.
I agree.

This is happening all over Maine.

Sustainable organic farming is the future .

Last edited by Cornerguy1; 12-22-2010 at 09:56 PM..
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Old 12-22-2010, 11:25 AM
 
1,570 posts, read 2,266,331 times
Reputation: 1032
More info about oil prices. $100 oil translates to about $3.25 a gallon gasoline, more or less. I think the article is optimistic in not seeing $100 until the second half of 2011.

Oil to Reach $100 on OPEC Capacity Drop, Goldman Says - BusinessWeek

Oil to Reach $100 on OPEC Capacity Drop, Goldman Says
December 22, 2010, 6:28 AM EST

By Yee Kai Pin
Dec. 14 (Bloomberg) -- A drop in OPEC spare production capacity will signal a “second stage” in the oil market’s recovery, lifting crude higher than $100 a barrel by the second half of 2011, according to Goldman Sachs Group Inc.
The Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries will supply more oil, reducing its spare capacity, as global inventory levels “normalize” from an overhang cause by the recession, the bank said in its 2011 commodities outlook dated yesterday. The 12-member group, which pumps about 40 percent of the world’s crude, said at a Dec. 11 meeting it will maintain production targets at levels agreed in December 2008
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Old 12-22-2010, 11:36 AM
 
Location: On a Slow-Sinking Granite Rock Up North
3,518 posts, read 3,513,066 times
Reputation: 2354
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexis4Jersey View Post
Tidal Power looks very promising , the force of the tides recently ripped off the blades on a test site in the Bay of Fundy. Imagine what Maine can do with the bays and coves it has , you could power the whole state and New England. Nuclear Power i don't think will be built in Maine , too many NIMBY's same in other states. Hydro power in small formats and Wind Power in large formats can turn Maine into a Power Hub. But the Development of Tidal power is key to that.
My father spent a vast amount of his marine construction business years putting in turbines among other jobs. Some were in the ocean, and others were in rivers.

As I recall from him when he was alive, A LOT of problems lie in foolhardy regulation (not reasonable btw, I don't mean to say that ALL regulation is bad) but some of it was downright ridiculous starting in the late 1970s. I wish at this point I could recall some of it.
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Old 12-22-2010, 12:14 PM
 
1,570 posts, read 2,266,331 times
Reputation: 1032
Quote:
Originally Posted by Revi View Post
We have a bunch of young farmers who have bought or re-started farms around here. They sell at the Skowhegan Farmer's Market on Saturdays and are doing well. One has veggies, there's an orchard and another butchers and sells rabbits, ducks and chickens. It's a great thing for the town, but I think the best thing is that the farmer's market could turn into the market fo the town if Hannaford's can't feed the area in a few years.

It provides a model and something that can be expanded if needed.
Agreed. We need operations like that to expand in the future. Do you know where the farmers came from? Local? From away? MOFGA involvement?
Quote:
I think we are going to be in real trouble starting in 2013, and maybe before if oil producers get wind of it. The price of a barrel of oil could go back up over $150, and that could lead to higher food prices.

I just heard this morning that higher meat prices are inevitable due to the quarter of the corn that's going to ethanol production.
Take a look at wheat, corn, oats, and other commodity prices in recent months. The impact of speculators as the markets get more volatile will magnify the swings in prices, I think.

I'm already seeing meat prices so high in my local Shaw's that it has affected my buying habits dramatically. Bacon at $4+ a pound!
Quote:
Anyway I think that farmer's markets are a way to get ready for peak oil. Right now they are small, but they could scale up into something that can help us when peak oil really hits.
One of Maine's advantages is the sheer number of farmers' markets we have. I think we'll have the time to see them scale up in both amount of gods offered and number of farmers.
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Old 12-22-2010, 03:42 PM
 
Location: Maine
145 posts, read 136,121 times
Reputation: 161
We have been concerned about Peak Oil for about 10 years. We have done a lot of things to get ready for it, and I was even on CNN to talk about it. Here's the spot. They wanted to turn me into a "survivalist", but I think it gets the message about peak oil across:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s2Vb0Iu-4co
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Old 12-22-2010, 09:11 PM
 
424 posts, read 336,255 times
Reputation: 456
Quote:
Originally Posted by Revi View Post
We have been concerned about Peak Oil for about 10 years. We have done a lot of things to get ready for it, and I was even on CNN to talk about it. Here's the spot. They wanted to turn me into a "survivalist", but I think it gets the message about peak oil across:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s2Vb0Iu-4co
I'm not surprised at how CNN tried to define you as a survivalist. The previously mentioned Sharon Astyk and a few other peak oil preparation advocates that have been profiled regarding how to better cope with a lower energy future have also been pegged in various media stories (one in the New York Times) as "survivalists." I suppose a story that better fits into some preconceived notion of what the editors are looking for or what the editors think their readers/viewers are looking for seems like a better story bet. They think PO advocates are some kind of Loony Tune story when in reality the advocates' message is usually one of practical frugality, efficiency, with an emphasis on family and local community. The first message is sensationalist and is probably thought to sell more papers or TV advertising spots while the second message is thought to be too plain and boring.

The whole term "survivalist" implies a certain me-first attitude along with supposedly extreme political views - at least to these media editors. I much prefer a "preparedness" label, whether it means being prepared for a lower energy future, an economic collapse, bad weather, or whatever.

'Tis a pity the media has to put such a cheap spin on things and people.
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Old 12-29-2010, 06:42 PM
 
Location: Maine
145 posts, read 136,121 times
Reputation: 161
I don't really know why they wanted to put the survivalist spin on things, but I was glad to get the message out there on peak oil. I figure 50 million people saw it on CNN that day.

Meanwhile gas is at around $3.20 around here and rising and we just got 100 gallons of heating oil at around $2.80 a gallon.

We have this winter under control, but it's going to be a tough one for a lot of people.

There was a former exec. on CNN yesterday saying that there will be $5 gas by 2012. I think they are getting us ready for what's coming.
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Old 12-29-2010, 07:27 PM
 
Location: Eastport, Maine
1,131 posts, read 1,498,908 times
Reputation: 1034
Well, it's global. The Chinese have finally decided to slow down their growth by increasing the interest rate. They are worried about inflation, and they also realize their growth could cripple the American economy in which they are so heavily invested. One must realize that most governments, except the US, to take a much larger and longer look at events that shape the future. The Chinese know it is best to slow down their growth, after all who will they sell all their goods to if the American economy totally tanks? Asian companies think in terms of hundreds of years, while ours think only of the next quarterly report. Slowing Chinese growth will have a moderating effect on oil prices. It will just be temporary though. The US needs to jump into nuclear power with both feet. We don't need to generate a single kilowatt hour using a petroleum product.

The world is still on shaky economic grounds. American companies are hiring, but they are doing it overseas. When the transportation costs (oil) get prohibitive, this production will move back toward our shores.

Oil has been a finite resource ever since it was first used in oil lamps. I think everyone, or most everyone knew that the peak production of oil has passed. It will become harder and more expensive to get. I just gave $3.23 for gas this afternoon. I suspect a lot of the oil pricing is just a few companies getting greedy over a less than dismal economic forecast. It's time to stick it to everyone again.
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Old 01-03-2011, 08:21 AM
 
Location: Maine
145 posts, read 136,121 times
Reputation: 161
They will get whatever the market will bear. I think over $3 is the new normal. I paid $3.20 over the weekend, but that was at a place that pumps it for you. $3.15.9 is the price most everywhere now in Central Maine now.

I think people will start to change their driving habits, and I've heard that people are buying less oil now to heat their houses. We're back to the amount Maine used in the 1980's again. There are a lot of people using natural gas in the southern part of the state, but people are burning more wood too. We're still the most dependent state on heating oil in the nation.
Everybody's so spread out that it made sense to use heating oil. Maybe not so much any more.
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