U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Maine
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-21-2011, 07:53 PM
 
Location: Land Of Moose, Blueberries and Chickadees
9,666 posts, read 4,546,789 times
Reputation: 12259
What about generators? Do people use generators in Maine? I have one for when the power goes out in a hurricane and it's strong enough to keep the a/c and fridge running for 9 hours a tank, (gas).

Can't you just use those instead of a car battery?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-21-2011, 08:38 PM
 
8,748 posts, read 10,948,733 times
Reputation: 3398
There are plenty of posts on here about the generators we all use. I was addressing ODN's scenario on possibly using a car battery and an inverter to run a whole house furnace. I don't believe that is remotely possible given the amount of power needed. That said I have a 6600 watt generator that powers enough circuits in my home that I can run my 220 volt water pump, my oil burner and my circulation pump, a number of lighting circuits, my freezers, my refrigerator, and the ignition on my gas stove and oven. That's all I need to survive for as long as the power is out assuming I have about 5 gallons of gasoline a day. I can run it on much less if done intermittently. People who do not have this kind of backup power are foolish in my estimation.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-21-2011, 08:57 PM
 
Location: Sacramento, CA/Dover-Foxcroft, ME
1,782 posts, read 1,798,162 times
Reputation: 2707
FWIW, I know at least two dozen family members and friends that DON'T have generators in Maine. They don't have a lot of things that are perceived to be necessary in Maine. That's probably how they afford to live in Maine. And yet somehow, they exist.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-22-2011, 04:27 AM
Status: "HSUS only cares about your money not animals" (set 1 day ago)
 
Location: On a Slow-Sinking Granite Rock Up North
3,489 posts, read 3,197,567 times
Reputation: 2319
If I could have a generator, I probably would; however, I can't afford to buy a big enough one and also have it installed properly (there are no electricians in my friends/family unfortunately). That's another way that people 'afford' to live in Maine. Having talented (and/or professional) friends.

That said, I wouldn't live here without a secondary heat source such as my woodstove. I grew up that way. We always had a woodstove.

We survived quite nicely during the ice storm of 1998 with a woodstove, coleman lanterns, candles, and a grill.

Anything that needed refrigeration went out into the garage, and any frozen foodstuffs went into a cooler out back in a snowbank.

When we owned a hunting camp, we did have a small one to run the lights. That was nice to have. We heated it with a monitor gas heater that we acquired from someone who replaced the one in their camp.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-22-2011, 11:32 AM
 
8,748 posts, read 10,948,733 times
Reputation: 3398
Quote:
Originally Posted by reloop View Post
If I could have a generator, I probably would; however, I can't afford to buy a big enough one and also have it installed properly (there are no electricians in my friends/family unfortunately). That's another way that people 'afford' to live in Maine. Having talented (and/or professional) friends.

That said, I wouldn't live here without a secondary heat source such as my woodstove. I grew up that way. We always had a woodstove.

We survived quite nicely during the ice storm of 1998 with a woodstove, coleman lanterns, candles, and a grill.

Anything that needed refrigeration went out into the garage, and any frozen foodstuffs went into a cooler out back in a snowbank.

When we owned a hunting camp, we did have a small one to run the lights. That was nice to have. We heated it with a monitor gas heater that we acquired from someone who replaced the one in their camp.
The ice storm of '98 prompted us to finally get a generator. We lost two freezers full of frozen food and the food in the refrigerator as well. That food lost was about the same value as the generator so I fugured it was well worth the investment. I wired in the generator switch and circuits myself. It isn't hard to do.
I can understand people not making the investment in a generator especially if you have a back up source for heat. For us I find it really convenient now to just take the generator out to the pad, plug it in, fire it up and run my furnace, water pump, (hot showers) refrigerator and freezer, several lights, TV and computer. I keep three or four days worth of gasoline on hand and replace it with new gas every couple of months. I just burn it in the truck and refill the containers. Yes we survived the 8 days of no power in '98. We rigged up a shower and heated water for it on the stove. We slept in front of the fireplace and blocked off the rest of the house with blankets over the doors. We had a gas stove for cooking and coleman lanterns and flashlights for light. We have an old well out front and used the water from that for bathing and flushing the toilet and melted snow and boiled it for drinking water. I like the generator scenario now much better.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-22-2011, 11:46 AM
Status: "HSUS only cares about your money not animals" (set 1 day ago)
 
Location: On a Slow-Sinking Granite Rock Up North
3,489 posts, read 3,197,567 times
Reputation: 2319
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maineah View Post
The ice storm of '98 prompted us to finally get a generator. We lost two freezers full of frozen food and the food in the refrigerator as well. That food lost was about the same value as the generator so I fugured it was well worth the investment. I wired in the generator switch and circuits myself. It isn't hard to do.
I can understand people not making the investment in a generator especially if you have a back up source for heat. For us I find it really convenient now to just take the generator out to the pad, plug it in, fire it up and run my furnace, water pump, (hot showers) refrigerator and freezer, several lights, TV and computer. I keep three or four days worth of gasoline on hand and replace it with new gas every couple of months. I just burn it in the truck and refill the containers. Yes we survived the 8 days of no power in '98. We rigged up a shower and heated water for it on the stove. We slept in front of the fireplace and blocked off the rest of the house with blankets over the doors. We had a gas stove for cooking and coleman lanterns and flashlights for light. We have an old well out front and used the water from that for bathing and flushing the toilet and melted snow and boiled it for drinking water. I like the generator scenario now much better.
I can see why.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2011, 05:40 PM
 
Location: Maine
7,704 posts, read 7,417,351 times
Reputation: 8209
A bit of info for those that believe people move here for the generous welfare benefits.

http://www.mejp.org/PDF/tanf_facts.pdf (broken link)
Myth: Maine’s TANF benefits are too generous and encourage people to move to Maine
from other states.
Fact: Maine’s maximum monthly TANF benefit is the very lowest in New England. Maine’s
maximum benefit for a family of three is $485/month, which is only 34% of the poverty level
($1431/month). Even when food stamps are added, TANF families reach only 65% of the
poverty level.
Data from the state’s Department of Health and Human Services clearly illustrates that
people are not moving to Maine for our benefits. DHHS compiled data about the relocation
patterns of people receiving assistance from TANF, Food Stamps and MaineCare. It found:
• Less than 1 percent of all 2006 recipients came to Maine from another state.
• From October 2002 – October 2006, nearly six times as many aid recipients left Maine
each month as the number who moved here.
• Of those who had come from elsewhere, nearly one-third had Social Security numbers
issued in Maine. This suggests that a large number of these individuals were originally
from Maine and were simply coming home.
• Finally, there was no significant difference in migration patterns between aid recipientsand the rest of the population. People receiving assistance generally came to Maine from
the very same states in the same percentages as the rest of the population. If people really
were looking for more generous benefits we'd expect a different pattern - a greater
proportion would be coming from states with lower benefit amounts.
Myth: There’s a lot of fraud in the welfare system—people are getting benefits even when
they don’t qualify.
Fact: Actual fraud is found in only about 2/10th of 1% of all TANF cases—that means that
99.8% of families do not commit fraud. There are strict eligibility requirements that families
must meet in order to qualify for TANF benefits. Eligibility is reviewed every six months andfamilies must report any change in circumstances within 10 days. The Department verifies
information about income and assets by computer checks with other government agencies such
as the Department of Labor, bank accounts and access to other public benefits like Social
Security.
Myth: Once on welfare, always on welfare. Lots of families go on welfare and stay on for
years and years.
Fact: Less than 1/10th of 1% of all families who received TANF at the beginning of the program
in 1996 continue to receive it today. The average length of time that Maine families stay on
TANF is 21 months.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2011, 06:39 PM
 
Location: Maine
2,192 posts, read 3,107,241 times
Reputation: 2275
Don't try to confuse them with facts, lol!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2011, 09:30 PM
 
Location: Caribou, Me.
1,221 posts, read 1,070,362 times
Reputation: 945
You're right, Msina: our welfare benefits often ARE quite low, compared to meeting the needs of many families. This goes directly back to a fatal flaw in the way we have structured welfare in Maine: we have decided to be "all things to everyone", and as a result, don't do much for ANYONE. Our welfare benefits are not targeted or smart. Almost any one can get some form of welfare. But it's often not enough. We haven't done the hard work of figuring out what actually would work the best.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2011, 09:47 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles, but looking for my niche in ME
321 posts, read 207,213 times
Reputation: 290
My main concern in ME is living alone at an old age and being snowed in. Without immediate family and a lot of friends. But from what I gather, human life do exist in ME. So, I think living in ME is possible. Sure, I'm talking from a point of view of a future retiree, with "God and the politicians willing", a good stash of savings for life (from VERY hard working. Always, since I was 14yo). I do not comprehend all this perception of people living off the welfare, or even moving just for it, but I may be wrong. I tell you how people can afford to live i ME, by honest hard work, diligent saving, respect to your neighbors, doing your best. That's how you live in ME or in any other state of our country.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:



Over $79,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Maine

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top