U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Maine
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-14-2011, 06:53 PM
 
Location: Connecticut
573 posts, read 333,271 times
Reputation: 485
Default Is Northern and Western Maine the most remote part of the US, east of the Mississippi?

Is there anywhere in the US, E of the Mississippi River as remote as the North Maine woods? I can't seem to think of anywhere that would come close.

What do you think?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-14-2011, 06:58 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
21,517 posts, read 27,120,938 times
Reputation: 8599
Any of the Unorganized Townships [UTs] that have no proper name, just a letter and number, are fairly remote. Not just the North Woods region.

UTs make up 52% of Maine.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-14-2011, 07:41 PM
 
653 posts, read 1,080,415 times
Reputation: 665
I used to do quite a bit of flying and I'd vote for Northern Maine as you head West. Route 1 is a hot topped highway on the eastern side of the state. Thirty miles west you will see Route 11 running through Ashland to Fort Kent. Next hot topped road you see will be in Quebec. It used to be from Route 11 to Quebec you didn't see much but woodlands. Now it's a checkerboard of gravel logging roads. It wasn't too many years ago that there would be folks lost during hunting season who perished before being found. Now, you never hear of that. Several miles in any direction and you will come out on a road of some sort...just no people living there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-14-2011, 09:11 PM
 
1,337 posts, read 361,992 times
Reputation: 656
Quote:
Originally Posted by papafox View Post
Is there anywhere in the US, E of the Mississippi River as remote as the North Maine woods? I can't seem to think of anywhere that would come close.

What do you think?
Maine probably wins the contest for having the largest area of low population in the northwest, though on smaller scale I might also point to Pittsburg, NH as a very worthy runner-up contender behind Maine (also see last paragraph). http://www.noerf.com/irk/nhmaps/New_Hampshire_population_map.png (broken link)

Pittsburg is the largest town (by land mass) in NH (it borders Canada) and though it has a population listed as 869 people, those people are spread out over 290 square miles (the size of the town), making for a population density of 2.98 people per square mile. That's a really low population density (and the population is most likely concentrated in the vicinity of the town-proper and below where the farm houses are. There's like nothing north of the town-proper other than tourist cabins on the various Connecticut Lakes, which are largely seasonal. It's all just dirt logging roads and mountains up there. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pittsburg,_New_Hampshire

In addition, by way of observation.... my opinion is that the figure listed for residents overestimates the number of people that actually "live" there. That may be the number of people that claim Pittsburg as their residency.... but come winter time... that place is a ghost town. I suspect a large number of so-called "residents" only live there during the warmer months.


The population density for Maine according to the 2000 US Census can be found at this map:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...lation_map.png

It lists < 1 resident per square mile for certain northwest counties which makes it even sparser than Pittsburg, NH.... but either way... I suspect both of them are probably the winners of the contest.

Also of possible interest (map provides a broader overview of the whole country by locality):

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...lation_map.png

http://www.learnnc.org/lp/media/uplo...on-density.gif

http://media-2.web.britannica.com/eb...0-459169A6.gif

Down by the Everglades in Florida, the state has a really low population density which is quite large in area..... might even rival (or exceed) Maine. Though I don't know if you really want to count that, given how much of that area is probably inhospitable for human habitation.

Last edited by FreedomThroughAnarchism; 07-14-2011 at 09:29 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-14-2011, 10:34 PM
 
Location: Caribou, Me.
1,260 posts, read 1,139,671 times
Reputation: 1003
As far as just pure remoteness, I don't think there are any areas in the entire lower 48 that are more remote than northern Maine. All the previous contenders have seen quite a bit of change over the last 50 years. Or they are located on the way to "somewhere else". But we're still our own little world lol
I like it........it keeps the crazies and wimps out lol
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-14-2011, 10:39 PM
 
Location: Land Of Moose, Blueberries, and Chickadees
9,782 posts, read 4,949,318 times
Reputation: 12485
Quote:
Originally Posted by FreedomThroughAnarchism View Post
Maine probably wins the contest for having the largest area of low population in the northwest, though on smaller scale I might also point to Pittsburg, NH as a very worthy runner-up contender behind Maine (also see last paragraph). http://www.noerf.com/irk/nhmaps/New_Hampshire_population_map.png (broken link)

Pittsburg is the largest town (by land mass) in NH (it borders Canada) and though it has a population listed as 869 people, those people are spread out over 290 square miles (the size of the town), making for a population density of 2.98 people per square mile. That's a really low population density (and the population is most likely concentrated in the vicinity of the town-proper and below where the farm houses are. There's like nothing north of the town-proper other than tourist cabins on the various Connecticut Lakes, which are largely seasonal. It's all just dirt logging roads and mountains up there. Pittsburg, New Hampshire - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

In addition, by way of observation.... my opinion is that the figure listed for residents overestimates the number of people that actually "live" there. That may be the number of people that claim Pittsburg as their residency.... but come winter time... that place is a ghost town. I suspect a large number of so-called "residents" only live there during the warmer months.


The population density for Maine according to the 2000 US Census can be found at this map:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...lation_map.png

It lists < 1 resident per square mile for certain northwest counties which makes it even sparser than Pittsburg, NH.... but either way... I suspect both of them are probably the winners of the contest.

Also of possible interest (map provides a broader overview of the whole country by locality):

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...lation_map.png

http://www.learnnc.org/lp/media/uplo...on-density.gif

http://media-2.web.britannica.com/eb...0-459169A6.gif

Down by the Everglades in Florida, the state has a really low population density which is quite large in area..... might even rival (or exceed) Maine. Though I don't know if you really want to count that, given how much of that area is probably inhospitable for human habitation.
Not that it's inhospitable so much as a lot of it is National Park and people are not allowed to live in much of it. I did live in the Glades and you are right, there really are not a lot of people there...although where I lived, it felt like too many people.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-15-2011, 04:33 AM
 
Location: Maine
5,644 posts, read 7,457,462 times
Reputation: 4603
Kudos to you for recognizing that there is a western part of Maine. A lot of people. including some who live here, know of only southern and northern Maine. A Discovery television show recently had an episode of a survival show in the oceanic shipping lane of northern Maine.

Are you looking for a remote place to live? Vacation?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-15-2011, 06:40 AM
 
1,552 posts, read 2,144,059 times
Reputation: 1017
There's a now-famous photograph of North America at night that shows the entire eastern United States as a mass of lights from towns, cities, streets, etc. The only black spot is northern and western Maine. By that measure, yes, it's the most remote spot east of the Mississippi. If you want more remote, you have to head north into Canada.

Here's one photo. Scroll down for a pic of North America:

Night Satellite Photos | Earth, U.S., Europe, World | Geology.com
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-15-2011, 08:18 AM
 
Location: Houlton
26 posts, read 25,685 times
Reputation: 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maine Writer View Post
A Discovery television show recently had an episode of a survival show in the oceanic shipping lane of northern Maine.
I saw that show. Dual Survival with Cody Lundin and Dave Canterbury. They showed how to survive in the wilds of Northern Maine. Then walked three miles and found the coast. LOL.....
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-15-2011, 10:09 AM
 
Location: Maine
5,644 posts, read 7,457,462 times
Reputation: 4603
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robel View Post
I saw that show. Dual Survival with Cody Lundin and Dave Canterbury. They showed how to survive in the wilds of Northern Maine. Then walked three miles and found the coast. LOL.....
If you find an ocean in northern Maine 1) you are more lost than you realize and 2) should stay there until your ship comes to rescue you.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2011 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram


Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Maine

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top