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Old 07-31-2011, 05:36 PM
 
Location: Out West
20,597 posts, read 15,424,228 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maureenb View Post
But...as is true with a lot of things...it's not what you see on the outside, but what's on the inside that matters.

White or brown layers can both produce mediocre eggs. A really good egg, whether it's three weeks old or three minutes old, is a result of the hen's diet. Pastured hens are more likely - not always true, though - to produce an egg with a beautiful, yummy orange yolk!

Geesh, with all of the choices available, buying eggs ("free-range organic cage free") has become almost as bad as buying a cup of coffee ("Grande Latte Half-Caff"). What does the nomenclature on the side of the egg carton at Hannaf**d's really mean???
Orange?!?!

I grew up with white eggs and though I see more brown eggs for sale here, I think it's psychological with me...I can't seem to bring myself to try one.

Also, the blood speck thing...many moons ago I did crack open a white egg to find a huge blood speck in the egg. I didn't eat eggs for a very long time after that. But, it happens regardless of color.
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Old 07-31-2011, 06:16 PM
 
Location: Union, ME
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By "orange" yolk, I'm referring to the yolk color that you see in a really good egg - at least in my estimation. So often commercial egg yolks are weakly yellow and don't have the nice, rich flavor of an "orange" yolked egg.

The darker yolked eggs are from my hens, and the lighter yellow yolk is from a local free-range egg I purchased: egg yolk comp (http://www.flickr.com/photos/mo_in_maine/5172575983/ - broken link)

If I don't have enough of my own hens' eggs to meet ends in the kitchen, I buy local eggs from the co-op. But they're never as good as those my clover grazing girls lay!

We are fortunate in Maine to have so many small scale local producers of hen fruit - white or brown; green, blue, pink, or chocolate speckled shelled!
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Old 07-31-2011, 06:37 PM
 
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here is some good info on brown and white eggs

Brown Eggs vs White Eggs - Difference and Comparison | Diffen
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Old 07-31-2011, 07:13 PM
 
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As MaureenB indicated, there are *other* colors of eggs as well. Perhaps the best known "weird" colored chicken egg are the blue to green eggs laid by araucanas: Murray McMurray Hatchery - Araucanas/Americanas

But also as Maureen says, what the hens eat is a huge determinate of egg quality, along with how long ago it was laid, etc.
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Old 07-31-2011, 07:30 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
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We have chickens, turkeys, and ducks [also known as swimming chickens].

We produce white eggs, brown eggs, blue-green [turquoise] eggs, and opaque eggs.

Organic eggs tend to have darker orange yolks that 'stand-up'. When you try to beat the yolk with a fork you will generally have to put some effort into the process to finally get their yolk to break.

I have been told that duck eggs are better for baking. Though I do not know this from any personal experience.

Otherwise there is very little difference between the color on the outside and what is inside.

Nationwide white eggs are dominate, so when you buy white eggs in a grocery store, they may have been shipped from across the nation or overseas to that chain.

I do think that brown eggs are more likely to be from local sources.
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Old 07-31-2011, 08:14 PM
 
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I have never noticed much of a difference other than the general observation that white egg shells seem to be a bit thinner than the brown eggs. When I go camping I bring brown eggs as I have had white eggs break more often. An egg is an egg.
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Old 07-31-2011, 08:57 PM
 
Location: Memphis, TN
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Personally, I think brown eggs just have a hardier taste and richer taste. Duck eggs are wonderful for baking-particular for their size (it's perfect).
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Old 08-01-2011, 04:53 AM
 
Location: Maine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GiJohnsGirl View Post
Personally, I think brown eggs just have a hardier taste and richer taste. Duck eggs are wonderful for baking-particular for their size (it's perfect).
It's because the white has more albumin (a protein) that makes baked goods loftier.
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Old 07-13-2015, 08:24 PM
 
Location: Approximately 50 miles from Missoula MT/38 yrs full time after 4 yrs part time
2,257 posts, read 3,169,580 times
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Default Turkey eggs???

What about Wild Turkey Eggs?

Every spring I find one of two Wild Turkey nests with 11 or 12 eggs in them. They are usually on the ground in heavy brush or bushes right up against the wall of the garage.

I have often wondered........how are they for human consumption?? Because of my bird dog having 'free run of my place' , I pick them up and give them to a local rancher who raises some turkeys and peacocks.
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Old 07-14-2015, 01:06 AM
 
Location: Maine
5,969 posts, read 11,132,103 times
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Heritage breed turkey eggs are mild so wild probably are too. Disturbing a nest in Maine is illegal.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Montana Griz View Post
What about Wild Turkey Eggs?

Every spring I find one of two Wild Turkey nests with 11 or 12 eggs in them. They are usually on the ground in heavy brush or bushes right up against the wall of the garage.

I have often wondered........how are they for human consumption?? Because of my bird dog having 'free run of my place' , I pick them up and give them to a local rancher who raises some turkeys and peacocks.
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