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Old 08-07-2011, 02:53 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
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We take our vehicles in every fall for fluid and filter changes [plus new windshield wiper blades] and about the same time we rotate tires and put studs on front. In the spring we do the fluids and filter changes again and take the studs off.

Fall is also the best time to stock-up on livestock feed. Farmers are harvesting, silos are full, and none of it has been trucked out-of-state yet. So get it when the getting is good.

The first 2 or 3 snows will not stick. They are simply reminders of what is coming. So the first time we get an inch is no big deal, it will go away in a day, and be followed by another week [or more] of sunshine, we all have lots of time to get things done.

Dormant-oil spray goes onto all fruit trees, to help them to prep for winter and to control boring pests and fungi on them.

For us that is hawg-killin time [hanging, butchering, sausage-making and lard-rendering season], followed closely by poultry culling season. Many tough decisions need to be made each year, to figure out which roosters and which hens to keep to over-winter. And winter-mulching our gardens.
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Old 08-07-2011, 03:01 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Three Wolves In Snow View Post

I just did a lot of that in May before I moved up here...with exception of anti freeze, I don't suppose I would have to all of that again in October, would I?

[ Have em change your oil and filter same time check everything over. If you don't have M/S tires yet have em put on BEFORE the first snow flies [you'd be surprised how so many wait till it happens then jam all the garages for the tires]]

Bam! Totally forgot about that stuff for the car. You are so right!! Thanks for the reminder!

[ Not a problem]

Where do you get those around here, in Maine? Home Depot? Wally World? True Value? NAPA Auto Parts? ?????


[Try any auto part store or Wally's in the automotive area [you may need to ask em at the desk]]
A lot of folks laugh BUT remember to keep a hat and gloves AND mittens with you don't let your body heat escape thru your head [THAT is where a lot of it gets out heat rises ya know] Gloves are good for gripping BUT fingers get cold fast with em. Mittens will keep fingers warmer as the finners are all together. ALSO [in case you didn't know this keep sunglasses with you a day or two AFTER a good snow the snow will be bright in the sun and can cause snow blindness [I went thru it and it hurts]
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Old 08-07-2011, 03:07 PM
 
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some melting "salt" is not a bad idea for ice on outside steps and walkways- many places sell 5 lb bags

a bucket of sand is also a good idea, to have handy, in case your driveway is like a sheet of ice, and your tires have no traction

most towns have the town "works" department, where most folks can help themselves to a free bucket of sand/dirt- ask around
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Old 08-07-2011, 03:30 PM
 
Location: MidCoast Maine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mainebrokerman View Post

any plastic around the foundation, (well to do mainers use hay bales, the frugal ones used bag leaves)
and windows do help-
Great ideas, everyone, thanks!
What are the hay bales for around the foundation? I remember seeing that when we were there visiting last time, mainly around homes outside of the towns as I recall.
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Old 08-07-2011, 03:49 PM
 
Location: Out West
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BoxCar Willie View Post
A lot of folks laugh BUT remember to keep a hat and gloves AND mittens with you don't let your body heat escape thru your head [THAT is where a lot of it gets out heat rises ya know] Gloves are good for gripping BUT fingers get cold fast with em. Mittens will keep fingers warmer as the finners are all together. ALSO [in case you didn't know this keep sunglasses with you a day or two AFTER a good snow the snow will be bright in the sun and can cause snow blindness [I went thru it and it hurts]
Yep, used to ski and snowboard so know very well about the glare. Plus, for lighter skinned folks, such as myself, I have to use sunscreen in the winter as the sun light bounces off the snow and can burn if I'm not protected.

Same with mittens, I was one of the few who wore mittens and everyone laughed at me. Don't care, my hands were warm.
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Old 08-07-2011, 03:52 PM
 
Location: Out West
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Have another question in regards to winter prep but this time for the garden:

I have many plants..flowering and bushes and some tomato plants. If I remember right, the perennials are the ones that come up year after year, right? Those are the type I have, (although I don't think tomato plants are perennials...are they?), and would like to know what do I do to help them through the winter?

Do they just die and come back, do I blanket them, do I keep snow off of them, (and how, that seems impossible), what do I do so that they come back next year, if anything.

Thanks.
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Old 08-07-2011, 04:21 PM
 
17,161 posts, read 22,182,489 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 221B View Post
Great ideas, everyone, thanks!
What are the hay bales for around the foundation? I remember seeing that when we were there visiting last time, mainly around homes outside of the towns as I recall.
weather stripping around doors and windows and door sweeps are a good idea too

here's a link that explains the hay bales and has some other good info



Winterizing Your Older Home; Stay Warm While Saving Energy and Money | DoItYourself.com
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Old 08-07-2011, 05:45 PM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
15,568 posts, read 9,592,084 times
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threewolves-yes, perennials come up every year, mostly. Tomatoes are annuals-either plow them back into the garden or put them in the mulch pile. Putting mulch around almost any plant helps prevent the roots from freezing. And if you have a bush that might break under the weight of a decent amt of snow, you can either sort of wrap it with baler twine (gives it more strength) or there's sort of tent things you get to put over it.
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Old 08-08-2011, 09:59 AM
 
Location: MidCoast Maine
471 posts, read 601,534 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mainebrokerman View Post
weather stripping around doors and windows and door sweeps are a good idea too

here's a link that explains the hay bales and has some other good info



Winterizing Your Older Home; Stay Warm While Saving Energy and Money | DoItYourself.com

Ok, after reading the link, I understand what the hay bales around the foundation of the home are for; thanks for the link to the informative article.
If an older home is in question with a 'drafty' stone foundation, is it possible to fill in the cracks with mortar (or other insulation material) in order to seal out the cold air, thus precluding the need for the hay bales or plastic sheeting set up around the outside perimeter of the house?
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Old 08-08-2011, 10:30 AM
 
Location: Maine's garden spot
3,095 posts, read 5,426,489 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 221B View Post
Ok, after reading the link, I understand what the hay bales around the foundation of the home are for; thanks for the link to the informative article.
If an older home is in question with a 'drafty' stone foundation, is it possible to fill in the cracks with mortar (or other insulation material) in order to seal out the cold air, thus precluding the need for the hay bales or plastic sheeting set up around the outside perimeter of the house?
Rock is a very good thermal conductor. hay bales give a small amount of protection, plus they give a nice spot for mice to live.
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