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Old 09-23-2011, 04:47 PM
 
Location: 3.5 sq mile island ant nest next to Canada
3,015 posts, read 4,872,001 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OutDoorNut View Post
I'd be more worried about storm surge, which can raise the level many feet in a matter of hours not centuries.

See if you can find any storm surge maps online.

Also see if insurance companies are happy to insure a house in a given location by the ocean.

Climate change may pose a greater danger to your dream than sea level rise: cold water from the melting nothern ice could divert the gulf stream futher offshore, thereby making the coastal area of maine much colder in the winter.
They keep rebuilding them on the Jersey shore. Every year or so the storm surge wipes them out and they keep rebuilding in the same spot.
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Old 09-23-2011, 06:31 PM
 
17,159 posts, read 22,175,230 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zarathu View Post
Try to remember that the maps for climate change are built on computer models that don't have all the data about how the climate changes.... by more than 10%. The climate models predicting the weather are only accurate for several days. We can predict the movement of hirricanes pretty well, but we still don't have a clue why they get stronger or weaker with any real accuracy. That, combined with the fact that the models were built on what has been confirmed as inaccurate and corrupted data from measuring stations, including stations that were just not included, and data from the past climate changes that were simply omitted, that you have to take these models with a whole package of salt.

Many people are apparently unaware that global climate in the period from 900 to 1300AD was much much warmer than it is today. The hockey stick curve ignored that.
Ive seen this many times on the history channel, the earth/climate has been much warmer, even before the industrial revolution...before all the flatulent cattle, before the cars, even before al-gore


If i wanted to move to the coast of maine, this wouldnt even be a consideration (climate change)
however, just in case mother nature has a hot flash, look at it this way- more people may want to move to a cooler state, and you will be sitting on prime property-along the coast
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Old 09-23-2011, 06:50 PM
 
Location: 3.5 sq mile island ant nest next to Canada
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WHen was the last time (or any time) you heard of a storm surge taking out a house on hte Maine coast? Just wondering.
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Old 09-23-2011, 07:46 PM
 
Location: Winterport
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Thanks so much for all of your feedback everyone. Just heard a great talk by Paul Kando on climate change at the CG Fair today. Paul, a chemical engineer who's very well-versed on solar power and energy efficiency, helped found the Midcoast Green Collaborative. I asked him if he had the property choice of living on a peninsula or heading for the hills, he had a good chuckle then replied there's no escaping the effects of change in our climate these days, but that moving to the peninsula shouldn't be a major concern.

My next question is....would any of the peninsula be suitable for large animals such as horses and sheep? Has anyone had the experience of farming animals in that area?
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Old 09-23-2011, 08:49 PM
 
1,061 posts, read 1,695,106 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by retiredtinbender View Post
WHen was the last time (or any time) you heard of a storm surge taking out a house on hte Maine coast? Just wondering.
They were sayining the same thing about Galveston, until the hurricane of 1900:


Great Disasters: Galveston Hurricane 1900: Isaac's Storm Part 1 of 8 - YouTube


Given that the industrial revolution is still relatively new, and that its impact on the enviroment is still unknown--we cannot be so sure the weather and climate of the past will continue without change.

Climate change IS something I will take into consideration when buying real estate on or near the ocean (or any body of water).

Which means, among other things, I will want an added margin of safety--extra height--above the high water mark.

.
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Old 09-24-2011, 05:07 AM
 
Location: 3.5 sq mile island ant nest next to Canada
3,015 posts, read 4,872,001 times
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[quote=palval1;21009577]Thanks so much for all of your feedback everyone. Just heard a great talk by Paul Kando on climate change at the CG Fair today. Paul, a chemical engineer who's very well-versed on solar power and energy efficiency, helped found the Midcoast Green Collaborative. I asked him if he had the property choice of living on a peninsula or heading for the hills, he had a good chuckle then replied there's no escaping the effects of change in our climate these days, but that moving to the peninsula shouldn't be a major concern.

My next question is....would any of the peninsula be suitable for large animals such as horses and sheep? Has anyone had the experience of farming animals in that area?[/quote]

There aere DEP rules on animals too near the water, I believe. Animal waste is considered pollution. You may want to look into that. Actually...now I'm curious.
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Old 09-24-2011, 05:18 AM
 
Location: 3.5 sq mile island ant nest next to Canada
3,015 posts, read 4,872,001 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OutDoorNut View Post
They were sayining the same thing about Galveston, until the hurricane of 1900:


Great Disasters: Galveston Hurricane 1900: Isaac's Storm Part 1 of 8 - YouTube


Given that the industrial revolution is still relatively new, and that its impact on the enviroment is still unknown--we cannot be so sure the weather and climate of the past will continue without change.

Climate change IS something I will take into consideration when buying real estate on or near the ocean (or any body of water).

Which means, among other things, I will want an added margin of safety--extra height--above the high water mark.

.
Places like Galveston sit lower in the water (depending where you are it may be as high as 10 feet above to a heckuva lot lower) and get different natural disasters than Maine. Not a good comparison. No more than saying "what if we got a monsoon like the Philippines?" Seems a typical ploy by the climate change groups.

I don't doubt there is climate change. Considering this is an ever changing world and that every so often Mother Nature shrugs to thin out the human herd. I just doubt that it is coming as catastrophically and quickly as some so-called experts say. Both side exaggerate the scale just like in selling/buying a car for example. One wants $5,000 for it so asks $6000. The other only wants to par $4000.... Get the drift?

Last edited by retiredtinbender; 09-24-2011 at 05:20 AM.. Reason: Yeah; now I spell check. DOH
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Old 09-24-2011, 06:44 AM
 
17,159 posts, read 22,175,230 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OutDoorNut View Post
They were sayining the same thing about Galveston, until the hurricane of 1900:


Great Disasters: Galveston Hurricane 1900: Isaac's Storm Part 1 of 8 - YouTube


Given that the industrial revolution is still relatively new, and that its impact on the enviroment is still unknown--we cannot be so sure the weather and climate of the past will continue without change.

Climate change IS something I will take into consideration when buying real estate on or near the ocean (or any body of water).

Which means, among other things, I will want an added margin of safety--extra height--above the high water mark.

.
We have someone who has never lived in maine-yet is all knowing, referencing a hurricane, from texas, thousands of miles away, to warn about what COULD happen in Maine??????????

Maybe Galveston, should start buying snowblowers and snowmobiles, and plows, because it snows in maine
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Old 09-24-2011, 02:17 PM
 
1,061 posts, read 1,695,106 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mainebrokerman View Post
We have someone who has never lived in maine-yet is all knowing, referencing a hurricane, from texas, thousands of miles away, to warn about what COULD happen in Maine??????????

Maybe Galveston, should start buying snowblowers and snowmobiles, and plows, because it snows in maine
I may not have lived in Maine.

But I have lived through hurricanes and through flooding.

And I will not live by any water, fresh or salt, without a great safety margin.
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Old 09-24-2011, 02:32 PM
 
1,061 posts, read 1,695,106 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by retiredtinbender View Post
Places like Galveston sit lower in the water (depending where you are it may be as high as 10 feet above to a heckuva lot lower) and get different natural disasters than Maine. Not a good comparison.
You missed the point entirely.

The point is NOT that Galveston sits low above sea level.

Until the 1900 hurricane, people--including the National Weather Bureau--once believed that a hurricane striking Galveston was nothing to worry about because hurricanes hadn't hit Galveston in recorded history.

So the point is that past performance is not an indicator of future performance.

This is especially true now, since there is no precedent for the amount of industrial activity taking place across the globe and no experience of that activity's potential for altering climate across the globe.
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