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Old 09-05-2012, 01:16 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in deep in Maine
3,476 posts, read 2,532,722 times
Reputation: 4197

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My comments about this got buried below in a discussion on buying cars in Maine. But as winter gets closer I want to share a bunch of videos that talk about the use of winter tires when the outside temps drop below 44F or 7 C degrees. They opened my eyes. All season tires are really 3 season tires.

These tires are softer than the 3 season tires, but below 40 degrees F they are about the same hardness of 3(or all) season tires above 50 degrees. And remember they are not just for snow anymore, they are for temperature too.

Look at these videos:


Tire Rack - Winter Testing at the Arctic Circle: Studless Ice & Snow Tires - YouTube


What You Need to Know About Winter Tires - YouTube


Winter Tyres v Summer Tyres: the Truth! - Auto Express - YouTube


Winter Tire vs. All-Season - YouTube
(Multi-cell winter rubber compound versus non-multi-cell all-season rubber compound. Test strips and ice cubes cooled to -11 degrees C 12 degrees F)


All Season vs Winter tires AWD 4WD Truck - YouTube
(for those of you who think that you can keep all season tires when you have 4WD or AWD will help you, you need to see this)


Hope this changes some minds. It sure did mine. Of course on ice or snow covered ice, you probably need chains:

Neighborhood watch

I'm putting Nitto NT- NS2 winter tires on my Subaru, but I'm putting chains on my Ford Explorer Eddie Bauer AWD for those conditions which are simply over the top. I don't drive that one except for over the top winter, or pulling my boat.

FYI: I don't own a car dealership, or a tire dealership, nor do I have ownership or stock interest in any of the above companies or stuff.
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Old 09-05-2012, 02:34 PM
 
Location: Northern Maine
9,481 posts, read 14,283,094 times
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We use Firestone Winterforce tires. They are more open than all season tires and they hydroplane less on slush. Slush is the absolute worst surface to drive on.

Maine has decided to stop using sand on most roads. They use calcium chloride. It melts snow at lower temperatures than plain old sodium chloride. There are at least three down sides to this idea. Slush remains on the road for longer periods of time. Calcium ruins your vehicle body, brakes, brake lines and electronic sensors. Calcium keeps run-off in a liquid form longer which lets water run into cracks in the pavement. That water hydraulically breaks up pavement and ruins roads.

Sand improves traction on all winter surfaces.
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Old 09-05-2012, 07:20 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in deep in Maine
3,476 posts, read 2,532,722 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern Maine Land Man View Post
Maine has decided to stop using sand on most roads. They use calcium chloride.
I presume that you are talking about state roads? I don't travel much state roads. Our local town pre-treats the roads with some solution which I suspect is just sea water pumped in from the ocean.
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Old 09-05-2012, 08:09 PM
 
Location: Northern Maine
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That may be true, but if they pretreat it is likely calcium chloride so the packed down snow won't freeze to the road before they get around to plowing it.
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Old 09-05-2012, 08:47 PM
 
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If you're not traveling state roads, what roads are you traveling? just the city streets in Ellsworth?
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Old 09-06-2012, 08:04 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in deep in Maine
3,476 posts, read 2,532,722 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern Maine Land Man View Post
That may be true, but if they pretreat it is likely calcium chloride so the packed down snow won't freeze to the road before they get around to plowing it.
I was under the impression that Calcium Chloride was a solid, whereas the stuff they put down as a pre-treat is a liquid.
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Old 09-06-2012, 09:04 PM
 
Location: West Michigan
12,084 posts, read 33,129,150 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slyfox2 View Post
I was under the impression that Calcium Chloride was a solid, whereas the stuff they put down as a pre-treat is a liquid.
It can be applied both ways. It is commonly used as a liquid pretreatment if there is a suspected bad storm coming. As a double whammy, in some areas the liquid form is also used as dust control in the summer months on dirt roads.
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Old 09-06-2012, 10:26 PM
 
Location: Sacramento, CA/Dover-Foxcroft, ME
1,808 posts, read 2,891,405 times
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calcium chloride, slush, sodium chloride, sand.....Winterforce tires....check
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Old 09-07-2012, 06:36 AM
 
Location: Kronenwetter, Wis
444 posts, read 972,476 times
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A few years ago I was driving on a slushy city street and a few cars ahead of me, this elderly woman's front tires got caught in the slush and it pulled her car head-on into the side of a corner building. We all stopped and went to her aid. She was dazed and incoherent. Saw in the paper the next day that she had died of chest injuries. (this was before the seat belt law) Every time I drive in slush my mind goes back to that incident. As NMLM said, slush is the absolute worst surface to drive on. Glare ice comes in a close second, but slush conditions are mostly more common.

In my area (WI) they'll put calcuim chloride (liquid brine) on bridges and overpasses on cold non-snowy days as well as snow days to prevent icing on these surfaces (black ice).

BTW, I"ve always been a snow tire advocate. On all 4 wheels, including 2 wheel drive vehicles. They help in stopping and steering.
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Old 09-07-2012, 08:39 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in deep in Maine
3,476 posts, read 2,532,722 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SportFury59 View Post

BTW, I"ve always been a snow tire advocate. On all 4 wheels, including 2 wheel drive vehicles. They help in stopping and steering.
Winter tires on only the front wheels of a FrontWD car produce unpredictable handling most characterized by the rear swinging out and putting the car into a 180 or 360 on turns.
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