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Old 09-12-2012, 01:08 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
29,722 posts, read 47,483,706 times
Reputation: 17569

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Quote:
Originally Posted by michael_atw View Post
... It's not very easy to regulate the temperature ...
When a log needs to be tossed onto the fire every 30 to 45 minutes. Regulation may be 'easy'. Going to sleep for 8 hours does not allow for feeding the fire.

The same thing happens when you leave the house for 8 to 10 hours.

Woodstoves work best when someone is there to tend them.

Otherwise you may need a thermal bank.
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Old 09-12-2012, 06:18 PM
 
Location: Lubec, ME
908 posts, read 869,373 times
Reputation: 447
Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
When a log needs to be tossed onto the fire every 30 to 45 minutes. Regulation may be 'easy'. Going to sleep for 8 hours does not allow for feeding the fire.

The same thing happens when you leave the house for 8 to 10 hours.

Woodstoves work best when someone is there to tend them.

Otherwise you may need a thermal bank.
I doubt many can man a wood stove around the clock.
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Old 09-12-2012, 07:15 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
29,722 posts, read 47,483,706 times
Reputation: 17569
Quote:
Originally Posted by michael_atw View Post
I doubt many can man a wood stove around the clock.
Of course, which is why mornings are cold without any form of thermal-bank in the system.

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Old 09-12-2012, 08:50 PM
 
Location: Sacramento, CA/Dover-Foxcroft, ME
1,808 posts, read 2,891,840 times
Reputation: 2826
I'm going to start building a small two story cabin on my family property in a couple years. I plan on using natural gas because I may rent it out on occasion. Wood, pellets or oil won't work for me. Eighty percent of Maine homes are still using heating oil and a switch to pellets would actually help Maine's economy. If I were to live there full time, I'd add a pellet stove and have two sources available like my brother does in his log cabin. Pellets because he's always complaining that he can't get his lazy kids to get up in the middle of the night to fill the wood stove. They will usually just let the wood stove run out and get up and crank the gas up.

As far as being old in Maine and living to a long age by working to the end, I met a guy at Eastern Maine Medical Center back in Sept. '03 in a waiting room at the hospital where my mom later died. He saw all my family sitting there kind of forlorn and worried and he started talking to my family about his family. He was the youngest of a dozen kids and had seen them all pass away. He was a farmer in Winterport and was there that day to visit yet another dying friend. He was 92 and looked great. He said that there's nothing more natural than seeing people pass away. He asked about our mom and was genuinely interested. With all his cognititve abilities and working around the farm strength in his shoulders and arms, he looked like he could still kick my behind. He was sent there by someone or something, I'm sure. We all still talk about him and his cool life that he had in Maine.

I had many relatives work like crazy in their 60's-70's and even 80's. My grandfather in Madison ran his family vegetable farm until he was in his early eighties. He only had one eye too. A decade earlier he wanted to learn to fly and got all the way to flying solo several times all knowing that he would never be able to get his official license. He just wanted to experience flying. My other grandfather started a business in Skowhegan when he was 56 and continued to work it for many years after that.
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Old 09-12-2012, 10:02 PM
 
Location: Caribou, Me.
4,861 posts, read 3,517,391 times
Reputation: 3405
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zymer View Post
Your oil furnace isn't going to work without electricity either, so that doesn't negatively figure into the equation of deciding whether to switch to a pellet stove as the primary heat source. In fact, installing a heavy-duty battery back-up unit for the pellet stove will keep it running for a while, giving you time to get your woodstove fired up before you get too cold. That isn't really an option with a regular oil furnace- once the power goes it's done too.

That's exactly what we did: get a heavy-duty marine battery for backup.
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Old 09-12-2012, 10:46 PM
 
468 posts, read 611,322 times
Reputation: 561
Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
When a log needs to be tossed onto the fire every 30 to 45 minutes. Regulation may be 'easy'. Going to sleep for 8 hours does not allow for feeding the fire.

The same thing happens when you leave the house for 8 to 10 hours.

Woodstoves work best when someone is there to tend them.

Otherwise you may need a thermal bank.
Bingo on the thermal bank..... such stoves are called masonry heaters and they work pretty well. For those who don't know, a masonry heater is a very large, masonry stove in which one burns one or two fairly quick (~1 hr, maybe 1.5 hrs) once or twice a day, then the damper is closed and the heavy, masonry mass re-radiates the heat stored in it back to the house. We've had one for 7 years now and, watching the furnace thermostat temperature readout in the living room, the temperature swing is at most 4 or so degrees between firings. (The furnace stays on, but is set way back to 60 or so and almost never comes on. We have a thermostat that keeps track of furnace running hours for the purposes of air filter replacement, and we seldom use the furnace for more than 20 to 25 hours an entire heating season. Our electronic thermostat works mostly as an electronic thermometer for gauging just how long and hard to fire the masonry heater.)

Masonry heaters are expensive, however. Ours was a precast, pre-cut masonry heater from a company called Tulikivi in Finland. (They have lots of dealers in the US) It was $15,500 installed. A complete custom heater can be several thousand dollars more.

They also work best in a well-insulated house as most heaters cannot put out more than about 25,000 BTU on a constant, hourly basis, but that's more than it sounds like since most furnaces, though they may be 100K BTU or more in output, seldom work a full 60 minutes out of every hour, that is, most furnaces actually put out far less than their nameplate rating, unless it's many, many degrees below zero outside, placing one's home, near the theoretical "design" temperature for the specific climate.

Still, I love our heater. The heat is very even and one or two fires a day is just enough playing with the fire to not get overbearing and monotonous. As well, since the fires burn very hot, the combustion is very complete, resulting in almost no smoke outside after just the first few minutes while the kindling is lighting up and of course, since the fire is out during most of the hours of the day, there's no smoke then either. As well, there is no fire danger when going to bed at night, since the fire is out and the damper closed (that slight but present danger always bothered me when we had a wood stove.) Since the fire burns so hot, the chimney gets no creosote build up either but rather, just a bit of fluffy, grey, fly ash that sweeps out effortlessly.

In the late fall, early spring, and on more moderate winter days, we often just build one fire a day, in the evening after dinner, which carries the house through the night. If the sun is out the next day, that is enough boost to get to the following evening. In cold weather, especially on cloudy, winter days, I do have to build a fire in the morning before work, but if not, then the furnace is still available too.

The Masonry Heater Association (MHA) WebsiteMasonry Heater Association | A Better Way to Heat Your Home

Fireplaces, bakeovens, sauna, natural stone, dishware | Tulikivi

Lastly, whatever you do, FORGET oil. Heating oil, thanks to Chindia's growing thirst for crude oil, and given the fact that world oil production has plateaued, if not outright peaked, will probably be $5 or more in a couple of more years. If one is already on oil, do whatever you can to get off it. Unless one is wildly wealthy, oil just won't be workable for most folk much longer, if it isn't unworkable already.

Last edited by beltrams; 09-12-2012 at 10:54 PM..
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Old 09-12-2012, 10:59 PM
 
1,961 posts, read 4,163,781 times
Reputation: 1800
Quote:
Originally Posted by RMoore007 View Post
As far as being old in Maine and living to a long age by working to the end, I met a guy at Eastern Maine Medical Center back in Sept. '03 in a waiting room at the hospital where my mom later died. He saw all my family sitting there kind of forlorn and worried and he started talking to my family about his family. He was the youngest of a dozen kids and had seen them all pass away. He was a farmer in Winterport and was there that day to visit yet another dying friend. He was 92 and looked great. He said that there's nothing more natural than seeing people pass away. He asked about our mom and was genuinely interested. With all his cognititve abilities and working around the farm strength in his shoulders and arms, he looked like he could still kick my behind. He was sent there by someone or something, I'm sure. We all still talk about him and his cool life that he had in Maine.

I had many relatives work like crazy in their 60's-70's and even 80's. My grandfather in Madison ran his family vegetable farm until he was in his early eighties. He only had one eye too. A decade earlier he wanted to learn to fly and got all the way to flying solo several times all knowing that he would never be able to get his official license. He just wanted to experience flying. My other grandfather started a business in Skowhegan when he was 56 and continued to work it for many years after that.
Inspiring stories! Thnk you so much for sharing!
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Old 09-12-2012, 11:28 PM
 
Location: Washington County, ME
1,549 posts, read 2,240,061 times
Reputation: 1858
One of the houses i'm going to be looking at is heated by woodstove and a KEROSENE heater. Ugh, grose to me... all i can remember is my kerosene space-heater of the early 80's and how the stink of it nauseated me. Any idea what kind of heater this would be?

I know electric is expensive, but my two houses i've owned have had electric baseboard heat and i love it. Room by room control, no fuel bill, no heater to go bad and get serviced every year, and it's safe. Yes i know i need a backup - but i dont want it to be kerosene.. thankfully the place has a woodstove but i'm anxious to see the place and see if i like the rest of it. My electric bill has never been what i would call 'outrageous,' and everything is electric in my house.

I wear warm clothes, have a dog and warm blankets for sleeping, and conserve where needed. I do understand that it costs more in Maine, and it's colder there.
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Old 09-13-2012, 03:39 AM
 
Location: Maine's garden spot
3,093 posts, read 5,422,768 times
Reputation: 3136
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jellybean50 View Post
One of the houses i'm going to be looking at is heated by woodstove and a KEROSENE heater. Ugh, grose to me... all i can remember is my kerosene space-heater of the early 80's and how the stink of it nauseated me. Any idea what kind of heater this would be?

I know electric is expensive, but my two houses i've owned have had electric baseboard heat and i love it. Room by room control, no fuel bill, no heater to go bad and get serviced every year, and it's safe. Yes i know i need a backup - but i dont want it to be kerosene.. thankfully the place has a woodstove but i'm anxious to see the place and see if i like the rest of it. My electric bill has never been what i would call 'outrageous,' and everything is electric in my house.

I wear warm clothes, have a dog and warm blankets for sleeping, and conserve where needed. I do understand that it costs more in Maine, and it's colder there.
The kerosene heater may be like a monitor type heater. Those generally use kerosene, and direct vent out of the structure.
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Old 09-13-2012, 01:14 PM
 
Location: Washington County, ME
1,549 posts, read 2,240,061 times
Reputation: 1858
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinB View Post
The kerosene heater may be like a monitor type heater. Those generally use kerosene, and direct vent out of the structure.
Thank You.. I'm going to Google
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